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bobm12

Tweezers advice?

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3 minutes ago, StuartBaker104 said:

I’m assuming you are talking about the Vetus ones that cost about £4 a set? Be interested to know what yours were like straight out of the packet? 

Yes, I think so. I did nothing to them, I just try to grab parts as logic and physics dictates. I don't expect the tool to make any miracle and in return for a good service I do not abuse it.

I have bought some more tweezers from a now defunct domestic maker, but haven't even tried them. 

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I have a ladies, very small, (No model number on it) Sekonda wind up watch that needs some work attending to on the hairspring.

This obviously represents quite a challenge and, without really good, fine tweezers, I think there's no hope of (Hopefully) getting this watch back in use.

I use a stereo microscope and when I view the tweezers that I have, they look like a garden shovel; compared to the hairspring!

Can anyone recommend any reasonably priced tweezers and where to buy?

I know there are plenty available, but they are way too cost prohibitive.

 

 

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Vetus make a fine tipped set of tweezers, but buy them from Cousins, otherwise you will probably end up with a fake pair like I did.

Ideally you would get something like Dumont 5.

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I also have a "fake" pair of Vetus tweezers, and after putting them through the "ringer" of completely refining the tips, they work nearly as well as my trusty "ZEE brand medical tweezers that I currently use for EVERYTHING, including installing crown tubes!

Since I don't like to rely on only one of any critical tool, I'm currently mid-search to see if other brands (Such as Stella) are good, or if I should just bite the bullet and get Dumont tweezers. Honestly, it's second (maybe) only to screwdrivers with regards to how often they are used so I guess I'm answering my own question regarding: "Should I just get Dumonts..."

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I tried a lot of of different tweezers as I pinged parts much too often. This was before I fully realized the importance of holding the parts as gently as you can without dropping them. 

After trying steel, titanium and brass I came across bronze tweezers from Boley and I have never looked back. Bronze is so soft and nice with a great feel. Just perfect for me for most anything apart from hairspring adjustment where it's Dumont #5. 

Stian 

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This is an interesting and "Helpful" thread and I thank you as I am shopping for tools. From this thread I have gathered that I should get Dumont #2 and #5 in brass. For S.S. I could go then with #3 and another #5. Advice would be greatly appreciated as well.

I too am amazed at Mark's video's and how steady his hands are, his knowledge and techniques, awestruck best clarify's this.

I have been doing some practice on junk watches, and finding that other than my unsteady hands, I have issues with tweezers and parts "popping" out and sailing away. The tweezers I am using are not the best and have not been shaped yet for watch work.  I also am wondering if I am squeezing too hard on them. I have made a small bench to work with, making it so that I would have good posture from the height and plenty of light. Probably my Irish luck so all suggestions and thoughts on the things that make a good technique will be very much appreciated.

Limited budget so I am keeping this to 4 tweezers to start with.

Have a wonderful day folks and blessings

 

Tim

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I am using vetus tweezers but I haven't interrogated their quality at all...  Probably they're fake because i paid for them only $1 dollar... I don't know if it is necessary to get high quality tweezers....  Buy my budget is very limited... 

By the way i always make propaganda for cheap Chinese products on the forum. I am aware of that but it is not easy to live in a third world country, especially if you have lost your job... Everything is problem in such countries, you know... I need for your understanding...  Sorry for that... 

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Vetus are good....try to find Favorite, Erem or Dumont, which are really the best. Sometimes you can find these brands very inexpensively if they're used....all you have to do is file them up.

 

Joe

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Few more question about Dumont tweezers before placing order.
 
1- While researching I read people preferring Dumont “brass” for certain tasks due to metal’s softness. For none-brass tweezers, should one choose DumonXel RC36 or harder DumoStar RC62 ?
 
2- Also, would one use “matte” rather than “polished” tweezers due to potential light reflexion or is it just a personal preference?
 
Lastly tweezers #3 & #5 have 2 different size specs.
 
Dumont #3 - straight tweezers sizes specs: 0.1/0.17mm vs 0.04/0.08mm
 
Dumont #5 - straight tweezers sizes specs : 0.06/0.1mm vs 0.01/0.05mm
 
3- Which specs for #3 and #5 are more adequate for watch repair ?
 
For information sharing, you will find Dumont straight tweezers specs sheet below:
 
 
Thank you,
AJ
Edited by ajdo

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