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  1. Valjoux / ETA 7751 Triple calendar moon-phase; This gold-plated Berney-Blondeau S.A. with an ETA 7751 belonged to a German gentleman who received it new on his 60th birthday in 1995. Through the years he kept the original box, the warranty card as well as the 1995 price-list and the dealer’s business card. He has worn the watch only on social accessions and the watch spent most of its time stored in a "Panzerschrank". According to the original price-list, the 1995 purchase price was 1450 CHF. As you can see, the watch held up pretty well, only a few small scratches in the front- and rear mineral-glass crystal and on the top of the lugs some of the gold-plating has worn through. The watch ran, all function did work. It had never been serviced nor opened Disclaimer; This walk-through is written in the way I do it. That's not to say it's the most correct way of doing things but as they say: there are many ways to Rome, all leading to the same result. Neither do I, as a hobbyist, have fancy horological equipment such as a cleaning machine or a "sterile" & "dust-free" room and therefor the end result will not be "Rolex"-standards. All I can say is that I'm always give it my best shot and I will mention problems encountered or were I went wrong, so you don't have to Without any further ado, let's dig into this beautiful & complicated watch ...... First make sure that you downloaded the latest ETA 7751 "Technical Communication". Throughout this walk-through I'll use the same parts reference numbers as used in the "Technical Communication". Below the currently latest September 2021 version; 7751 manual.pdf Before having done anything to the watch, I tested all the functions for proper working and took the timegrapher readings to see if there was anything which needed special attention. These readings can later be compared with the readings after the service. Dial-Up; Dial-Down; Crown-Right; Crown-Down; Crown-Left; Crown-Up; From the readings, it's clear to see that the watch needed a proper service. The back-lid, just like the front-crystals found on pocket-watches, required a knife-type case-opener. Checked out the oscillating weight ball-bearing, it had next to no play and therefor good for another round. Removed the oscillating weight (48). Removed the two casing-screws and clamps, pulled the stem and flipped the case over onto a soft pillow. With the watch-case removed, the winding stem re-inserted and the movement was placed in a proper 7750 (or family) movement-holder. To me, working on these movements a proper movement-holder is paramount. During the disassembly of the movement I encountered some problems and without this holder I most likely would have made scratches or worse..... Pulling the 8x hands; they all came off without any problems. All the hands safely nicely stored in a small plastic container. The same counts for the dial, after the removal directly stored in a plastic container with on both sides of the dial a soft lining. Removal of the Day & Month indicator disk (78) and the Moon phase indicator (79) The keen observer may have noticed that there are no screws next to the movement holder, for example the two screws holding the Day & Month indicator respectively. When working on complicated movements or movements which I'm not familiar with, I took on the habit, when possible, to replace the screws in the same hole as they came from. For sure, it's more work, but some movements do have multiple types/sizes screws and it will become a big puzzle if you store them in the same container / basket. Replacing the screws works (most of the time) very well for me, but in some cases the replaced screws shoulder-out deeper than as they would have done when holding the part above. The protruding screw may touch parts below or when replacing bridges, prevent the bridge from not seating fully "level". To me, replacing the screws thoughtfully is far simpler than facing a huge sorting puzzle later. Removal of the combined maintaining plate (76) and the Month star driving wheel (77). The three tiny screws holding the maintaining plate (76) were extremely tight. I couldn't loosen them with my standard (new) screwdriver bits so I had to grind the screwdriver bit to match the exact the same shape as the screw-grooves. Only then, with "force", they came loose and I was glad for having a proper movement-support! One slip of the screwdriver, with the force that was required, could / would have easily made a deep score in the plate or worse ........ Removal of the Day jumper spring (71), Day & Month jumper (70), Day jumper (72) and the Moon phase yoke (73) plus an early warning ! With those parts out of the way, the Moon phase platform (75) had to come off. Assuming that the with the arrow highlighted screw was one of the screws holding the platform down, I turned the screw only to discover that it was the moon-phase corrector eccentric ....... Oops !! The setting of the eccentric has to be checked at the end anyway, but now I know for sure that it's set wrongly. Removal of the Moon phase jumper (69), Corrector maintaining small plate (66) and the Moon phase jumper spring (67). Still in the picture the Date & Month jumper (74) which should have been removed before this picture was taken. The original stem was replaced by a longer stem to adjust the Calendar driving wheel (61) which was holding the Date-star (63) down. Removal of the Date-star (63, shown in the previous picture) together with the Date-corrector (65) and the corrector maintaining small plate (66). Removal of the calendar platform (62). Slowly back to familiar ground; a standard ETA 7750 starts to appear ... Removal of the Hour wheel 24hrs H1 (59), the Calendar driving wheel (61), the Hour-wheel (60), the Day corrector (58) and the Day corrector spring (57). The removal of the Hammer-spring (56), Set hour-hammer operating lever (53 & 54), Hour counter lock (55), Hour counting wheel (52), Minute-wheel (51) and the free Cannon pinion (50). Pulling of the Driving pinion (49) has to be done carefully; either with a pair of hand-levers or two small screw-drivers. The upwards force on either side of the pinion has to the equal or you may break the pinion of the great wheel (16) (a previous experience has taught me so !! ) Flip the movement over and from here on I'm using a Bergeon 4040 movement holder. First the removal of the Hammer-spring (45). When removing this spring I had up till now difficulties avoiding making a small mark in the Automatic device bridge (44). It was our WRT-member "Nickelsilver" who tipped me off using a piece of Scott tape over the edge of the bridge. This worked very well and for the first time I was able to remove the hammer without leaving a mark! Thanks Nickelsilver! The hammer-spring (45) and the Clutch-spring (47) removed. Remove the Auto device bridge (44). Removal of the Reversing wheel; (43), Reduction wheel (41), the Clutch (40), Oscillating pinion (39), the Hammer (42), Chronograph wheel (37), Minute-counting wheel (38), Minute-counting jumper (46), the Lock (33), the Operating-lever (36) and the Minute counting driving wheel (19). Removal of the Chronograph bridge (34), the Friction spring (32) and the Operating lever spring (35). After the removal of the Ratchet wheel driving wheel (33) it's time to release any residual power in the main-spring. This can be done by holding the crown, lift the Click-spring (20) and slowly release the tension by slipping the crown through your fingers. Removal of the Chronograph cam (29), Cam jumper (28), Detent (30), Ratchet wheel (23), Crown wheel core (22) and Crown wheel (21). Removal of the Balance Assembly (26+27), Pallet bridge (25) and Pallet fork (24). Removal of the Barrel bridge (18). Removal of the power-train; the Great wheel (16), Third wheel (15), Second wheel (14), Escape wheel (13), the Movement barrel (12) and the Stop lever (17). Flip the movement over for disassembling the keyless works. Removal of the Setting lever jumper (11) together with the Intermediate setting wheel (10), the Time setting gear (9), Rocking bar (8), Yoke (6), Setting lever (5), Winding stem (4), Winding pinion (2), Sliding pinion (3) and the Yoke spring (7). All the parts safely stored in a compartmentalized box with lid, ready for cleaning & demagnetizing. Regarding the "wear & tear" of all the watch-parts; it was clear to see that the watch hadn't seen a lot of use. The Oscillating weight ball-bearing (48) was good, reversing wheel (43) looked good etc. However, I decided to change out the main-spring. This type of barrel has a lid which cannot be "pushed" open. To open the lid, I place a sharp knife in the groove between the barrel and the lid and while pressing down on the knife roll the barrel, in my case on a "soft" leather underground to avoid doing any damage. This widens the groove into a small gap and with the smallest screwdriver one can pry, going around the barrel, the lid off. When done carefully you won't leave any marks. Barrel & Arbor cleaned, braking-grease applied ready for the new spring. Apart from a few (see "technical communication" !) the parts were soaked for 24hrs in Zippo lighter fluid and pegged; all the sprockets, pivots and jewels. Thereafter all the parts were checked for magnetism. Instead of using the unreliable compass method, I'm using an App called "Lepsi" on my iPhone. This App doesn't tell you how much magnetism there is, it only indicates whether there is any. The distance of the object above the screen, by which magnetism is detected, gives you some indication of the strength of the magnetic field, but nothing more. For me, when magnetism is detected, that's enough to "Zap" the part on my no-nonsense self-build demagnetizer. Of course, in reality the demagnetizer is not placed anywhere near my iPhone or the other watch-parts / metal-objects like here on the photo. Also it may be a good idea to take your watch off during the "zapping” operations! Quite a few parts, particularly in the calendar works, were magnetized. With the main-plate anti-shock Chaton cleaned, pegged, cap-stone oiled and re-installed in the main-plate (1), the assembly of the 7751 can begin. Escape wheel (13), Second-wheel (14), Third-wheel (15), Main-spring barrel (12), Great-wheel (16) and Stop-lever (17). Installation of the barrel-bridge (18) (by a 7750 the wheel-train the and barrel-bridge are combined in one bridge). Make sure that all the wheels turn fine before tightening the screws; check, check and double check. Again, if you using the re-installed screws method, some screws may protrude the bridge. (I took the "warning picture" below a little later, so don't look at any additional installed parts) All the Lubrications as per the ETA 7751 "Technical Communication". These two re-installed screws do protrude the Barrel bridge (18). The one on the left will touch the Great-wheel (16) and the one to the right may just touch the main-spring barrel (12). Back them out far enough so they don't cause any trouble. The installation of the Crown-wheel (21), Crown-wheel core (22) and the Ratchet-wheel (23). With the movement turned over, installation of the keyless works; Sliding-pinion (3), Winding pinion (2), Winding-stem (4), Setting-lever (5), Yoke-spring (7), Rocking-bar (8), Yoke (6) and placing of the Time setting gear (9) before placing the Intermediate setting wheel (10) and Setting lever jumper (11) as a "combination". Keyless work completed. Check for proper working! Installed the pallet-fork (24) and the complete balance assembly (26 & 27). Cleaned, pegged the balance Chaton and oiled the cap-stone. Before going any further with the assembling, I tested the power-train and escapement for any irregularities. On the timegrapher the readings were looking a whole lot better than initially. Instead of picturing each position, here are the readings; DU & DD both 292-294 degrees, 0 ms and 0 s/d. CU: 244, 0.1, -14 s/d CR: 249, 0.2, -16 s/d CD: 252, 0.1, -6s/d CL: 262, 0.0, -5 s/d Even though I adjusted the Etachron as good as I could, that's to say centring the hairspring between the two regulator pins and thereafter reducing the regulator pins gap to the point that the hairspring could still, but just "breath", the positional deviation with max. 16 seconds is slightly higher than I was hoping for. Then again, it's not a chronometer grade and each position produced straight lines, so I think that with some daily-rate adjustments the watch will run just fine. Once satisfied with the running of the power-train and the escapement, the assembly of the chronograph can start. Cam jumper (28), Chronograph cam (29), Detent (30), Minute counter driving wheel 30 minutes (19), Lock (33), Operating lever spring (35) and the Operating lever (36). As said; lubrication as per "Technical Communication" and test the proper function of the start/stop and reset levers. Placement of the Ratchet wheel driving wheel (31) and the Friction spring chronograph wheel (32). Install the chronograph bridge (34); don't forget the lubricate the Reversing wheel jewel on the bottom of the chronograph bridge before placement. Also pay attention to the reset-lever, it has to be pushed in so the bridge can sit level & flush. Check the working of the Ratchet driving wheel (31) and the reset lever before tightening the bridge screws. The placement of a well lubricated Reduction wheel (41), Minute counter jumper (46), Oscillation pinion (39, biggest sprocket down), seconds recording Chronograph wheel (37), Minute counting wheel (38), the Clutch (40), make sure that the oscillation pinion pivot is engaged), Reversing wheel (43) and finally the Hammer (42) before the Automatic device bridge (44). Before installing the Automatic device bridge (44), lubricate the jewel for the seconds recording Chronograph wheel underneath the bridge. The installation of the Automatic device bridge can be very tricky. It's very easy to touch the Clutch (40) and the pivot of the Oscillation pinion comes out. Before inserting or tightening the bridge screws, double-check the placing and working of every component!! Once the bridge is installed and with the relevant lubrication done, before mounting the hammer-spring (45) and the Clutch-spring (47), all the functions of the chronograph can be checked & tested; the engagement of the oscillation pinion, the smooth running of the seconds recording chronograph wheel, the advancing of the minute counting wheel, the start/stop- and reset-levers etc. Next is the installment of the Hammer-spring (45) and Clutch-spring (47). To prevent scratches on the Automatic device bridge (44), as per brilliant idea of WRT member "Nickelsilver", a piece of Scotts tape was taped over the edge of the bridge. With the installment of those two springs, the assembly of the chronograph is completed Movement flipped over and placed in the 775x movement holder. Installment of a well lubricated Driving pinion (49), The Cannon-pinion (50), the Minute wheel (51), Hour counting wheel (52), Set hour operating lever (53+54), Hour counter lock (55) the Hammer spring (56), the Day corrector spring (57) and the Day corrector (58). The build-up, up till the Day corrector spring (57) and the Day corrector (58), was identical as to a standard 7750. The Hour wheel 24hrs (59) drops over the Second wheel (14) pivot. Attention: Sadly, no picture but when installing the Hour wheel (60) over the Cannon pinion, one has to lift the Minute wheel (51) slightly and to make sure that the hour wheel teeth do engage in the small minute wheel sprocket. Once they engage, both wheels can be lowered in place. Finally, before installing the Calendar platform (62) the Calendar driving wheel (61) with the "day finger" pointing as shown. From here on I pulled the winding stem to stop the running of the movement and thereby avoiding the advancement / altering of the positions of the wheels. The installation of the Calendar platform (62) can be a bit tricky. It's all too easy to dislodge the hour lever (53) and the Hammer spring (56). Make sure that the platform sits flush with the Main plate (1) before tightening the 3x screws. Place the Day star (63) as shown in both above pictures. Placing of Date + Month jumper (70), the Day + Month jumper (74) (Both jumpers are identical), Day jumper (72), Moon phase yoke (73), Day jumper spring (71), Date corrector (65), Corrector maintaining small plate (66), Moon phase corrector (68), Moon phase jumper (69) and Moon phase jumper spring (67). Installation of the Moon phase platform (75), the Combined maintaining plate (76) (Be aware that the top of the Combined maintaining plate slides in the gap of the Day Star) and the placing of the Month star driving wheel (77). Placing the Month & Day indicator disk (78) and the Moon phase indicator (79). Adjusting the Phase corrector eccentric (64) wasn't that hard as I feared. By adjusting the eccentric one determines the "depth" of the Date corrector (65), shown by the blue arrows. Set too high and the top-sprocket of the Date corrector (65) won't even touch the Moon phase corrector (68). Set too deep the top-sprocket of the Date corrector will jam the Moon phase corrector (68) into the Moon phase indicator. The "depth" has to set such that the sprocket of the Date corrector (65) pushes the Moon phase corrector (68) just far enough so that it will just advance the Moon phase indicator by one click before the top Date corrector (65) sprocket releases the Moon phase corrector (68). There is clear information about the Moon phase corrector "depth" setting in the ETA 7751 "Technical Communication". With all parts installed and tested as far as possible, the dial goes back on. Before re-installing the hands, I re-lumed the minute & hour hand with new high-class LumiNova. Both hands now re-lumed and drying before the installation. Placing the long Date indicator hand required a bigger size hand-pusher which I didn't have. The idea was born to cut a tweezer protector-cap from the top until the required size was obtained. Stuck to protector cap onto the handle of a diamond file for more stability / pushing-power. It worked like a treat Turn the date quick-set until the month indicator disk changes month, that will be the first (1) day of the new month. The rest of the hands (8! in total) to be set at 24:00 midnight when the day indicator disk changes. Detailed instructions about the "shift tolerances" are described in the ETA 7751 "Technical Communication". All the hands installed and correctly set on the month / day / date and moon phase. The 18th of January 2022 had a full moon. The German gentleman received the watch when he turned 60 in 1995, now I'll continue with his watch as from my (65th ) birthday in January 2022 I'm still awaiting new crystals and once the case has been restored, I'll add the final picture of the fully restored/serviced watch. I really enjoyed working on this watch and I do hope that my write-up will be of some use to somebody, at some point in time! Regards: Endeavor, Denmark
    8 points
  2. Random thought I assume you demagnetized it? The nice thing about the graphical display is the meaning hasn't changed since the first machine spit out paper. Although some of the timing machine manuals you wonder about the mental state of the people who Were interpreting the results. The one I'm attaching is pretty straightforward. Then I snipped out an image of what it probably is. Then unless you verified the lift angle your lift angle is probably wrong. But that's not going to change the graphical display output only the amplitude. Timing-Machine-Charts.PDF
    6 points
  3. Holiday present to myself. I ordered an ETA 2824-2 elabore movement, PVD coated stainless case with sapphire crystals, dial and hands from a watch materials supplier in Switzerland. None of this stuff was cheap, but the seller guarantees that all the parts are Swiss made and I don't have any reason to believe the items are not genuine. The strap is made in China, but I don't believe in spending big money on 'designer' leather straps. So what do you folks think?
    6 points
  4. Here it is. Unlikely this will be the ultimate configuration.
    5 points
  5. We are back in India, visiting family, and my wife decided that we needed to modify a quilt for my nephew with some means of hanging it up. For that of course you need a sewing machine. There are actually three sewing machines in the house here, but they are all somewhat ancient. I thought I'd tackle the two hand cranked ones first. Not a problem I thought, how difficult can it be to get an old hand cranked sewing machine working. Well as it happens, quite difficult, since they have both been lying for many years having been put away with various ailments. I have them both purring away now like... well like a well oiled sewing machine obviously. The list of faults included gunked up lower bobbin case, rusted lower tensioner path, rusted upper tensioner, gunked up crank gears, sticky bobbin winder, stuck stitch length adjuster and of course the usual dried up oil we are all so familiar with. The two machines are both the archetypal "Merritt" model that you see in tailor's shops everywhere in India, and are remarkably similar to their Scottish built Singer counterparts. They are also equally bomb proof. There is a third machine with a treadle which I may take a crack at later, but I managed to make the hanging tube with one of the ones have fixed, so the third machine will need to wait till I am sufficiently bored by the latest current covid restrictions to be in need of some more ancient mechanical device restoration therapy.
    5 points
  6. Fröliche Weinachten und ein Glückliche Neues Jahr! May the wheels of fortune smile on you all, may the spring in your step never be broken, may your life never hang in the balance, and may you always wind up with enough time on your hands for everything you face in the coming year!
    5 points
  7. Sure, I'll go and chop down one of'em and try to burn it on top of my kitchen-range. All part of the "Great Reset" that will make us all happy. I.e. the super rich elite governing the world through politicians.
    4 points
  8. I would put a pair of timing washers on, opposing screws, this is exactly what they are made for.
    4 points
  9. Back in 90s when quartz movements were popular , there were jobbers in Iran who rewound watch coils all day in a funny looking home made rig that consist of an electric motor attached to some hand made adaptors on which they mounted these to rewind. I never watched how it was done, they did solder terminals as well, you could get a rewound coil for a dollar plus exchange. @AliMoloodian a WRT member used to rewind them for his own use. He doesn't understand much English so I'll ask him to show pix of the gear.
    4 points
  10. Update. It was magnetized. Put my small compass on the balance and ta da movement. I demagnetized it and here is the result (somehow I forgot to do this???)
    4 points
  11. There's not too much to fret over if you've done a regular 7750 before. There are two wire click springs on the calendar plate that can jump, and 4 jumpers. Two use springs mounted on the plate, and two the wire springs shared with the moonphase advance lever and corrector. The jumpers for the date and year look identical, and they are, in spite of the manual showing different part numbers, so don't worry about mixing them up. If you've done a 7750 then you are already familiar with the spring for the hour counter hammer and zero lever, that one is always fun to put in place. There is a flat wire spring for the day corrector here, which is easy to overlook or think that it's secured in the plate, but it comes right out. The manual makes it clear how to orient it when reinstalling. The date advance wheel doesn't need to be oriented like the pair of wheels in a regular 7750 day-date, it advances everything in order without any fuss. Pay attention to the minute wheel- it has a little cap on the pinion which needs to go over the hour wheel teeth. This is easy to miss and will lock things up if not installed correctly. Normal 7750 doesn't have this. Otherwise just follow the (very good) manual for lubrication and assembly. They say not to service the barrel but of course you can and should if not replacing it. On a watch this old it might be a good idea to replace it along with the cannon pinion and reverser for the automatic and possibly the rotor bearing. Do the adjustments for the moonphase corrector (again well explained in the manual), the difference between locking up and not working at all is a very small adjustment.
    4 points
  12. I like the guide rails for the honing guide. Well done! Here's mine: Slightly different approach. Sapele (body and lid), leather (gasket), hide glue, and garnet shellac, with flush inlaid DMT diamond stones, and a honing strop made of wenge (iirc), steel plate, hide glue, and leather. Lid on is the first pic, coming off is second, and in the third it's attached to the bottom using the same leather gasket that keeps it tight to the top. Guides and such live in the pocket. If I need to use a stone from the side, I can pull it out with the magnet (tool pocket, top left), and the pocket to the right keeps it in place while retaining access to the shoulder. Definite overkill for screwdrivers, but that's not what I made it for. I also do a lot of hand tool woodworking, and keeping blades scary-sharp is a necessity.
    4 points
  13. More updates on my Pultra 17/70 restoration, almost ready to go now, been making long small T nuts and a plate to fit Multifix QCTP a friend has made an extension for the tool rest because being 70mm centre my tool rest was way short.
    4 points
  14. I'm late, but Merry Christmas to everyone. (For yesterday)
    4 points
  15. I bought myself a little Christmas present.. Well?! What? Don't judge me... its got a blue dial. I couldn't resist.
    4 points
  16. Been working on another Vulcain Cricket. This is a rebuild from a rusty start and a donor watch (also a rusty watch). The hand was floppy on the cannon pinion. Not sure how that happened--was not my fault--the watch came to me in pieces (the last guy gave up I guess). In one of my watchmaking books, there was a mention of using a jeweling tool to close the hand tube, so that is what I did. Of course...as delicate as I was, I overshot and ended up having to use a staking tool to open it back up slightly. Got it now. I have two of these Seitz tools. One has a base hole of 3mm and the other 4mm. I only had one solid stump and it was a 3mm one. I prefer the 4mm tool, so I just let the stump "float" for this exercise.
    3 points
  17. I have just serviced this Swiss made golf scorer. The main interest to a watchman is that the reset of the scores is done by turning the crown a full circle and each score is reset by the 'hammer' labelled A in exactly the same way as the second and minute hand flyback resets of a chronograph.
    3 points
  18. If you want to download a newer version of the technical document you can do it at the link below. https://shopb2b.eta.ch/mecaline/7751-7751-11.html
    3 points
  19. Hi, My father who spent many years collecting pocket watches and repairing them has recently moved into a Care Home suffering from Alzheimer's Dementia and I have got the unenviable task of clearing out his workroom. My husband and I both have engineering backgrounds, having worked at Rolls-Royce Aerospace, and are familiar with or can work out what some tools do but are less familiar with some of the more specialised watchmaking/repairing tools that my father has. We have already used watchrepair talk.com/forum to gain knowledge on some tools, thank you, and would very much appreciate using the knowledge of the members to identify some of the more obscure tools and their manufacturers, if possible. Hopefully, this is within the remit of the website. Julie
    3 points
  20. Hi All, Im relatively new at this and have been playing about with random junker watches over lock down and enjoying the hobby. I wanted a vintage divers watch to add to my growing collection and found this item on Ebay. It was a bit of a mess on the outside but but inside was a nice ETA 25 jewel 2452 with a bit of service history etched on the backplate. The stem was broken, the crystal was shot and the rotating bezel was cemented with what I can only guess was wrist-cheese. It also looked as if a metal, expanding bracelet had been fitted in the past and had worn grooves on the inside lug faces. The surface of the case was brushed but covered in scratches. I know ppl frown upon case polishing but this watch was going to be mine and I like shiny watches so removed the stem tube and polished it up. The dial was almost immaculate - I wanted to relume the markers but the numbers were printed on top of the lume so I left them alone. The lume on the hands was starting to disintegrate so I figured I would have a go at reluming those (my first attempt at reluming - not totally happy with the result). Ultimately I want to replace the bezel but Im finding it harder than I thought to find one the right size that isnt going to cost more than the watch itself! After movement cleaning I got a nice line with an amplitude of about 280 but a beat error of 1.0 which needs looking in to... Anyway I hope you like the pics!
    3 points
  21. Welcome here. Since you have already hands on experience you should be able to do a lot before more training is needed, then when it comes to that I recommend the high quality one by our Host Mark Lovick at watchfix.com
    3 points
  22. I just recently, and for the first time, used the same trick to get the case back off an Enicar Ocean Pearl having the same type of case back. It just wouldn't budge using my Jaxa tool and my sturdy case holder. Why anyone would screw on a case back that hard is beyond me, but perhaps it is necessary to preserve the water resistance!? I usually just use my suction grip ball to tighten the case back and then a final touch with my Jaxa tool to make sure. Anyway, I used Epoxy glue, and it probably was an overkill as it took many hours to dissolve it in acetone. Superglue is likely a better option. The case back just wouldn't budge using my Jaxa tool despite having a good grip. Using Epoxy glue was a probably an overkill. Using a wrench the case back still wouldn't budge but instead the jaws on my sturdy watch case holder started to give. Luckily the lugs fitted more or less precisely in my vise. It took many hours dissolve the Epoxy in acetone. Superglue is probably a better option.
    3 points
  23. Magnetism in a watch is interesting because normally you would never see it? At least in modern times because the demagnetizer is right next to the timing machine normally. At least it was at school and that's what I was taught. Although I know watchmaker's today that will demagnetized before cleaning after clearing before timing after timing they get really obsessed so magnetize watches on the timing machine not likely to happen or be seen. A long time ago I was asked to evaluate a small collection of watches with the owners newfangled Chinese 1000 timing machine that I had recommended. He was confused with the reading he was getting. I timed his watches exactly as they were found no attempt to demagnetized clean etc. Then I was really excited about the opportunity to compare the Chinese 1000 with my witschi watch expert 2 machine. When evaluating timing machines to avoid complications it works out better if the various timing machines can look at the exact same watch at the exact same time. To understand what I mean there is a sample watch one of the other watches and you notice both microphones holding the watch in a way that you normally would not. Then the results may not always be exactly the same because you can't start both machines at the exact same time. They won't be of evaluating or averaging over the exact same part of the waveform they're always be some variations but this is the closest I can get to both machines at the same time. As you can see that interesting sine wave effect. It also shows a problem of liquid crystal screen timing machines versus the old paper tape or in this particular case software that simulates paper tape. Although I don't know why on the paper tape simulation there should be two lines and it looks like the watch visually is perfect in beat unless you look at the numbers? But in any case all three are showing the same thing an interesting sine wave which I had never seen before. As we see above once the magnetic field is gone the watch still desperately needs to be serviced but the beautiful sine wave is gone.
    3 points
  24. If you use a watch case cushion with the outer removable ring it can be made non-slip by adding one of the 60mm silicone dial protectors sold by Cousins and others.I suppose that cling-film or thin polythene sheet would also serve but the silicone has the best non-slip property.
    3 points
  25. I strongly agree with the above statements about working on cheaper watches first. Pocket watches are bigger and easier to start on. I serviced about 15 before moving on to wristwatches - I felt quite confident, but suddenly the parts seemed so small ! Buy some cheap Swiss movements, - I recommend doing at least 5 before having a go at your precious Omega. Or do the same one 5 times, practicing handling the balance/hairspring, oiling the balance jewels. I know from experience there is a high probability of trashing the first movements
    3 points
  26. Guys firstly I must say that I am impressed on all the fantastic vintage watches you all collect Recently I purchased these 2 from ebay First is a Precisa automatic of unknown year but looks maybe 1960 ish Second is a Tissot manual wind of unknown years as well Maybe some of you may know brand and how old? Both these are very nice shape Precisa is gold and Tissot is rose gold
    3 points
  27. I think it's a bent pivot on the escape wheel.
    3 points
  28. Bulova 11 BLAC from 1970 (N0 case code). Before and after shots. Bought with receipt and user manual from 1973. Was missing the crown and setting wheel. Low profile Acrylic crystal fitted (Sternkreuz XAC311.624).
    3 points
  29. Well, this was quite a project!! Must have been many years since it was serviced. I noticed when taking it apart, several wheels were stuck--3rd wheel in particular. After cleaning the usual way (L&R ammonia base fine watch cleaner), I noticed that the jewels had a lot of crud on them. I had to clean them under a microscope using peg wood. It was terrible. Then I noticed some junk on the third wheel bottom pivot. Frankly I wanted to just move on (the owner will were this once in a while at parties--does not have to be a time keeper). But my Dad was whispering in my ear and everyone on this forum was screaming at me!! DO IT RIGHT! So, at great risk (due to my inexperience), I chucked the wheel up in the lathe and burnished the pivot with a pivot polisher (that came with my Jacot set). I cleaned it up and nothing bad happened. Repeated on another wheel with success. No shortcuts on the balance either. I removed the hairspring, cap jewel and regulator. Cleaned and oiled and back together. Assembly was tricky with this tiny watch. The pallet fork plate fought hard. I had earlier noticed little nick marks all over the pallet plate. Now I know why! Got the dial on, set the hands and DAMN!! Cannon pinion was loose. Yet another opportunity to fail. I had bought the cannon pinion punch and stake for my Seitz jeweling tool so now was the time to use it. Two tries before it was tight. Lastly, I regulated the watch and noticed that the hairspring was never leaving the regulator pin, so I had to give it a slight nudge. That seemed to improve the beat considerably--have not tried to think that trough as to whether it makes sense. The watch is together and I am heading for the liquor cabinet!!!
    3 points
  30. I have received this piece of sorry. It is bad green gunk on the movement and on the outside of the dial looks like it had seawater or something in it at some point in it's life. However the good part is I shook it and it ran for half an hour or so.
    3 points
  31. Hi I read a lot of people asking about microscope to work or inspect parts. To help people decide and make their own decision I'll provide here some pictures from it. This is the model I brought. My personal opinion is that it's really very helpful because you have really a great working distance almost 20 cm with good resolution of course if you bring closer the optics you can have higher Magnification. I've chosen to go for X100 because it's more than enough for watchmaking (I'm not a biologist So if you've any question you're welcomed
    3 points
  32. They accepted a surprisingly low offer, soooo..
    3 points
  33. Not just Rolex watches is a lot of watches that people with relatively little experience should not work on. Either the parts are going to be impossible to get or going to be extremely expensive. Always something to consider when working on a watch that accidents can and do happen and they tend to happen more with less experience.
    3 points
  34. This is probably the only platform where I can show what I found and the people will actually care......
    3 points
  35. Alida was a trademark of Havila Watch Co., Switzerland. The following might be of interest : https://www.watchuseek.com/threads/niello-pocket-watch-any-ideas-or-info.5288787/
    3 points
  36. I bought some more Bergeon screwdrivers because Esslinger was having a special. Anyway, I hate those standing screwdriver holders...I have two. So I made this 3D printed stand/holder. I like my drivers to sit in order of size in a nice neat fashion. They get scrambled up during a service, by I always put them back neatly. Now I have this to assist.
    3 points
  37. It looks very, very nice. However, you can buy a torch for around £20. It’s a good idea to go for one with a square base so you can place it on your desk with the flame pointing upwards without the risk of it falling its side. Butane gas £2/3 for 300ml can. Brass shavings, 250g will be way more than what is in this kit and will cost you around £5 from eBay, go for the fine shavings if you get the option. Brass tray, I bought a very small brass ashtray from eBay for £3 and a small hand held vice for £3 to clamp the ashtray. Pair of gloves would be good to hold the vice if it doesn’t have a wooden handle but a towel would do the job just fine, that’s what I used. Soldering board to rest the bluing tray on £6. The rest, tweezers, rodico, glass, you probably already have. So, the total is £40, let’s call it $55. That leaves you with $110 in your pocket.
    3 points
  38. A Timex Marlin non runner, probably from the mid sixties (1964?), heading for the 404 club. EDIT: The seller messaged me to say they have posted this, and added "... I have also found another watch which may be of some use, for spares, this watch does not work as the crown is missing, but it does have a decent strap on it, if it is no good to you to pop it in the bin..." So it looks like I may have a freebie genuine "mystery" watch for the club too.
    3 points
  39. That is the price set by Cousins. If one wants to save and can wait a bit for delivery, sapphire crystals can now be had starting at about 5 Euro. For example: https://www.aliexpress.com/item/1005003097980569.html
    2 points
  40. I should check all the wheels individially for mashin problems due to worn pivot holes and pinions as somthing is slipping under power. Dismantle the watch again and check every wheel with its neighbour as the depthing is out between wheel and pinion.
    2 points
  41. I show "Texas" and Texas is a country!!
    2 points
  42. It would be nice if we just knew the home country of where people were as answers can change depending upon your country. Like when you're looking for material the resources available in different countries very. The only problem with the time schedule is it assumes that the person is maintaining something resembling a normal time schedule and not hopelessly out of sync with the world like some of us are. So for instance at 3 AM I'm unfortunately typically awake. Then I was really happy I slept in past 12 Today as it was nice and quiet out there.
    2 points
  43. Fixed stud holders generally came in two types, One;, stud friction fitted into the hole of the stud holder, Two; stud is secured in the hole by a screw. Other designs were manufactured too. I unscrew the stud with cock still on the mainplate, so there is no need to hold the cock down with brass or wooden stick, the movement& movement holder hold the cock secure. this is safer and easier. Usually faults in hairspring show when the oscilator is running, little faults however might go unnoticed specially if at or near the collet. You really don't have a good view of the coil unless the oscilator is out so it can be inspected under good magnification. I don't believe a audmars piguet get reassembled with a little fault in the coil. Regs
    2 points
  44. https://r.search.yahoo.com/_ylt=AwrIQZKtisNh6d0AZQN3Bwx.;_ylu=Y29sbwMEcG9zAzIEdnRpZAMEc2VjA3Ny/RV=2/RE=1640233773/RO=10/RU=https%3a%2f%2fdownuup765.weebly.com%2furgos-clock-service-manual.html/RK=2/RS=9NeT8HO7051TfvTrUgw5Zyujtiw- this site has urgos information which may be of interest to you. By The Way it would be nice if you could use the introduction heading so we have a little more background and some pictures of the said clock as our Crystal Ball is out of action cheers
    2 points
  45. There were even more simple probes, all you need imo. Just an U-shaped wire, pointed tip on one end, 2 mm plug on the other: Usually a quartz is tested contactless, without opening the watch. A piezo receives its 32 kHz vibrations, processed by a narrow band (quartz filter) amplifier. Frank
    2 points
  46. I have fixed several watches for my neighbors and advertised to other friends that I would fix their watches--for free. So...it has been fun. Those who get their watch back in perfect working order love me and have promised to attend my funeral (as far as I know I am not about to die--but only God knows). Well, this developed beyond my expectation. My neighbor contacted all of her friends, law enforcement, customers, other neighbors, friends (neighbor is a Lt. in the local Sheriff department). So in order to feed my insatiable desire to fix things of horology (although one friend asked if I could fix an ancient typewriter), she gathered a pile of timing pieces to be fixed. I received them this evening as a Christmas gift. Each piece with an attached email address so that I can communicate with the owner. They have been informed that when their item is fixed, they must come to my little watch shop to pick it up. LOL...I love it. I have not counted, but I would guess about twenty watches and maybe eight clocks. I love this journey I am on, and I love to see the joy I bring when someone gets their time piece running. There are no watchmakers in the area, so people just give up on their time piece. So, I am now buried in work. And...I know already...I will not be able to accomplish this work without the wisdom of my friends on this forum, so I thank you in advance!!!
    2 points
  47. While cleaning doesn't fix everything neither does the handiwork of others applying excessive oil. I had a pocket watch the other week that was like that was literally drenched in oil and for that cleaning is the proper repair. The unfortunate problem with learning watch repair is that everybody breaks stuff. All of us remember the stuff we've broken. If you not breaking watches you're not working on them. But with time The things that you break diminishes considerably hopefully.
    2 points
  48. Someone had tried on a large Sector watch at the jeweler shop. Only later the owner found that the person managed (how?!?) to snap the stem in the little time he handled it, but didn't say anything. The crown is signed and of a peculiar look, of course Sector service center said that it's not available anymore. Then, somehow I botched on the correct way of removing a stem broken flush on the crown, that is to cut around the top of the female threaded section about 1mm to grab it. The sliding portion left for good and the fixed one was ruined. Time to think something different, all in all it took about two years until yesterday. All work was done an a non-watchmakers baby lathe with standard tools. An extremely useful one is the carburetor jets gauges below. These are now discontinued or sell for a stupid price but I had secured the pair from a German metrology seller. As the usual I apologize for the rough pictures. I started by drilling a blind hole in the original crown "core" to be the largest possible without touching the threads. Then cut off the button from a spare screwdown crown. That revealed the mistery of how the pipe, which holds the sliding portion and its spring, is attached to a screwdown crown. It's screwed in as well! But, once turned to press fit size into the hole of the original crown (3mm) there was not enough material to hold a firm friction fit. That I remedied turning and pressing in a brass sleeve. I left the contact surface a little rough to improve friction on the 0.05mm interference. I don't know why but most of my mechanical repairs involve sleeving and shimming. Then I turned a tube to push the above into the crown. It's sized so to be also used as a stump on the staking set. It went in without issue. Compressing air in there is not ideal, but once I realized it was too late to pull it out back and cut an escape groove. The finished item works fine on the case, all is left to do is to cut a new stem to size and return it to the happy jeweler.
    2 points
  49. To get into the watchmaking mood I put some Finish heavy bluegrass ticking away, shore makes the lathe turn!
    2 points
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