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  1. I don't get to post here very often. But I picked up an interesting specimen at a local flea market: a TruTime talking atomic watch - for a dollar. The vendor didn't know much about, except that he didn't know how to make it work. To be honest, neither did I at that moment, but I intended to give it a shot. I figured if I failed it would still be a cheap lesson. I happened to have a 2032 battery for it, still very fresh. As a precaution I cleaned the contacts and blew it out a bit. Put a touch of quartz oil at the very few pivots it had, and it just sat there at first. So I went online to search for the setup instructions. With their aid, I got it set and running. Now what? I don't need a talking watch. And I don't want to just sell it. My oldest daughter has a friend who is legally blind, and her sight is degenerating. So I'm giving it to her. Best use I could think of for it. I have to find the link to have a braille copy of the instructions sent out.
    7 points
  2. Late to the party, but this is my first proper luxury Swiss timepiece that I've owned. Only picked this up last month. An Omega Speedmaster Moonwatch Professional Co-Axial Master Chronometer Chronograph 42mm (The sapphire sandwich version). I’m over the moon (no pun intended) with it and wear it almost on a daily basis. I love the Co-Axial Master Chronometer Calibre 3861 and the open exhibition style case back to see it in all it's glory. Never, ever, ever going to even take the case back off this watch! Before any of you have thoughts of the horrors a newbie like me could cause this masterpiece of craftsmanship and engineering.
    7 points
  3. I assumed that these correctors have to be pushd out from the inside of the case and 3D-printed an appropriate tool which I used in combination with a pair of parallel plyers. It worked!
    7 points
  4. My collection changes regularly as I do lots of watch trading. I really don't need most of the watches I have and many are project watches that I intend to restore, some of which I will keep and some I will let go. But since I'm new here, I thought I'd share my collection with others so you can know a little more about me. Not included in this shot are some I recently sold, a Seiko 62mas and a Seiko World Time. Some of these are heirlooms or gifts from my wife of 40+ years. You can see I am a bit obsessed with Seiko. Sorry.
    7 points
  5. Without Youtube, or should I say the Internet, I would never have gotten into servicing/repairing. So I guess you're right about that. Nevertheless, it wasn't that I just happened to see one of those watch repair videos that got me started. It was a strong inner urge to be able to service a watch (long story) that drove me to actively research the Internet for information about it. Being well over 50 years old, having young kids, and doing fairly well in my profession, going to a watch school just wasn't an option (something I mourn quite a lot). I remember watching some of the videos on the Watch Repair Channel but having zero knowledge of watch repair, those videos basically just made me feel intimidated and confused. I should say that these days with all the knowledge I have obtained over the years I appreciate the Watch Repair Channel immensely and there's basically only one other repairer that I respect as much as Mark and perhaps even more. That repairer has a member name on this forum being a combination of one transition metal and one precious metal Eventually, I found a Youtube channel named "Ratfaced git". It was hosted by a retired car mechanic named Dan. Naturally, his approach was much that of a car mechanic, rather than that of a skilled and experienced watch repairer. Dan hardly knew the names of parts, didn’t care much and was proud of it. It inspired me endlessly and gave me - at that time a complete mechanical idiot - the courage to try it myself on one of those Vostok movements that could be had on eBay for a few dollars. Honestly, without those videos, I’m not sure my interest would have taken off and that I would be writing this post. I have now taken several online courses and I have some of the books by Fried and DeCarle, and I have learned tons on this forum, but without that retired car mechanic, I'm not sure that would have happened. Have I butchered any watches? Well, butchered is a strong word, but to be honest, some of the watches that I have been working on would likely have been better off in the hands of a pro. For that, I apologise to the watch gods and the pros. Yes, they all make it look so easy, don't they? Complete and perfect service and repair of a Rolex 3135 in under 40 minutes, and for that, "the pros have the audacity to charge $500 or more". Having some personal experience of what it takes to just service a watch without doing any repairs, I'm personally amazed that the pros can even survive at those rates, but I guess they're really good at what they're doing. Nevertheless, I think these Youtube videos are great for promoting watches in general and that means more people will want to have "a real watch" and that is a good thing for the trade on the whole. Sure, some of those affordable vintage watches will be butchered in the process, and however sad that is, there are millions and millions of them out there. And, although there's a lot of ooohing and ahhhing in the comment sections, I rarely see comments where people express that the video gave them the confidence to service/repair the family heirloom themselves.
    6 points
  6. I bought my son-in-law a 3D printer for Christmas, never having even seen one myself. He went on vacation and left it with me to play with for a week. I'm an old machine designer so I have no problem with designing things using 3D CAD software. I had seen someone else's idea for this and I didn't like their design, which used way too much plastic in my opinion and was too bulky. It took me a couple of hours to design it and 8 hours to print it. I had to chase the holes with a 1/4" drill bit afterward. It works the same for my Bergeon and Horotec pressers. I already have numerous things I want to do to change the design, but at 8 hours per copy, I don't think I'll make many more than this one. Let me know if you would like the STL so you can print your own.
    6 points
  7. I just tested „Dr.Tillwich Antispread“ by partially treating a hand mirror with it. The picture of two oil drops shows impressively where the Antispread has been applied.
    6 points
  8. I don't know how you could be sure if the epilame has been removed. In the past when I've gotten it on a pivot by accident* I take a piece of pegwood, flat end, and press it down on the pivot while turning it. Again, not sure if it really removed it, but- years ago I did some watches for a small manufacture that had a reputation of the balance pivots eating in to the cap jewels. The watchmakers there told me to do the above with pegwood; it seems there was some invisible abrasive embedded in the pivots of these staffs, and the pegwood trick did work in sparing the cap jewels. It used to be that the manufacturers and Moebius said treat the whole fork. Somewhere along the line they changed that and say just treat the jewels. I know some watchmakers who still treat the whole fork, and they don't seem to have issues. I've also seen examples of forks with wear in the fork horns, apparently from having epilame there. So I err on the side of caution: I grab the fork in one set of tweezers, then dip some closed #5s in the Fixodrop, then dip the stones in the Fixodrop that's been sucked between the tweezer tips by capillarity. A friend of mine uses a tiny artist brush to apply it to the stones.
    6 points
  9. I received this watch in a large assortment of watches and movements about a year or so ago. I assigned very little value to the crushed Lorsa P72 inside, disassembling it just for the practice. The inside of the dial had the outline of the hour wheel and the main plate had the shape of the cannon pinion coind into their respective surfaces. Setting all of the pieces aside for quite some time I finally realized that I already had several replacement main plates for this movement. I settled on this orphaned plate, salvaging the jewels needed from the old plate and reinstalling them into this one. I also found a replacement hour wheel, escape wheel, cannon pinion and crystal from the many piles of used parts that I have been slowly sorting through. Several jewels, even some that I did not have out, needed to be adjusted in and/or out to aquire the requisite end shake, as well as the resulting engagement between one wheel and another within the train. I also needed to recurve the flattened dial to clear the newly installed hand work. As of today, I have been wearing it all week, pre regulation, and it has been consistently running about thirty seconds/day slow with a slight beat error. I will be adjusting the beat error and regulating it this weekend. My first intentions were to replace the dial, center wheel (it lost the second hand arbor when it got crushed) and find a replacement sweep but this ZOMBIE of a watch has been growing on me, as is (shown above). Thanks for looking. Shane
    6 points
  10. The thing with the regulating pins, is the basic logic is if you open them, the rate drops, and drops more as amplitude goes down. You could have them open enough that after 24 hours the spring is barely hitting them, so the rate goes way down. But if the spring isn't centered you can get very interesting results, including an increasing rate as amplitude goes down. Imagining a normal gap on the pins, if the spring favors strongly one side due to poor centering, the spring might pull away more at higher amp, and stay totally or almost totally in contact at lower amplitudes. As you change position, gravity is affecting the spring as well, and so in certain positions it might pull away still (your 12), but stay more in contact in the other ones, including the horizontal positions. This is just one possibility in your case. But the thing any school will hammer and hammer and hammer into students heads is before doing dynamic poising, every thing else must be perfect first. Otherwise, even if you had what looked like a clear poise issue, you can be embarking on a wild goose chase. I'm quite sure you can get your 24h delta lower, and without resorting to some of the techniques in the Hamilton book (which is a truly fantastic book). The pinning points, the way the hairspring leaves the collet, and the terminal curve on an ETA or Sellita has been intensely studied and should need no manipulation, and with the Etachron system you have a very easy way to get the hairspring really behaving top notch between the pins. It could be that in the end your best route is to do some dynamic poise, but do check and recheck and adjust any and everything else first.
    6 points
  11. How many years of experience someone has is irrelevant if they have been doing it wrong for all of those years.
    5 points
  12. Completely new to watch repair, shiny new tools in hand and impatiently waiting for a Unitas 6431/6445 to arrive in the post to begin to learn on, I decided to take a stab at disassembling and reassembling an old watch that was passed down to me, nothing sentimental, was just floating around with some unknown jewellery. With a bit of research I've found it's an Australian designed 9ct Hantily case with an AS 676 handwound movement. After researching Hantily, I've discovered that they were producing cases in a factory in Richmond barely a kilometer from where I live. The spelling of the logo (business changed several times) and the Ebauche SA TR shield stamp makes me believe it dates to between 1926–1934. I was too nervous to try and clean it properly, but I successfully managed to fully strip and reassemble the movement, set the time and recase it. The tiny movement size of 8.75''' blew my mind at how delicate things were. Several screws barely turned with my 0.80mm screwdriver, and I also had to drill a hole in my new loupe... While probably a stupid first undertaking at least now the pocket watch is going to seem huge in comparison!
    5 points
  13. For those who see my posts here in the clock section will know I have been working on two vintage ships clocks. One has been returned to the customer and the one remaining had a severely faded dial and the customer said I could do what I wanted with this movement so I thought I would experiment in re- furbing the dial. I did do a test re paint and it was poor to say the least so I originally decided to draw the dial using ‘Indesign” and use water slide decal film. It did take me a few hours to actually draw the dial but after following many YouTube vids I managed to achieve what you see in the pics. However it is not perfect but does give it an authentic look. I cleaned the old dial with mentholated spirits which removed some brown substance but still left it with a patina look.. I used “Safmat” self adhesive printing film as it is thicker than the water slide film which allowed greater control when positioning.. I coated with a clear acrylic coating.
    5 points
  14. I know this doesn't help the OP, but I had to sleeve one of these externally yesterday so I snapped some pics. You can see the post is super worn, and it made setting very hard. I turned the post down in a faceplate, turned up the sleeve in beryllium copper, pressed it on, and bingo!
    5 points
  15. The 4 blade tool works great.... but not the way you think it would work. Initially I had problems with the 4 blade tool. It takes a lot of pressure on the knurled wheel to actually wedge under the beze and advance the bladesl. When having to use so much force, you lose tactile feedback. You can't tell when the blades are not engaged proper or when it has traveled so deep that it is touching the lip of the watch case. In any case, the risk of damaging the bezel, watch case or the tool is very real. The way I discovered to use the 4 blade tool safely is to use a small hammer to tap on the movable jaw of the tool. I first engage the blades of the tool into the gap between the bezel and the case and tighten it lightly. Then I use the small hammer to tap on the movable jaw. The small amount of backlash in the screw threads will allow the jaws to move forward. If there is any "give", you will feel the knurled screw loosen and will be able to tighten it a little more. Continue this tapping and tightening until the bezel pops off or the blades stop advancing anymore. If the blades stop advancing, it probable means that it has reached the lip of the watch case. In that case, you can wedge a thicker blade into the gap under the bezel and pry it off. I hope this helps.
    5 points
  16. Ok so I'm a bit gutted I've just worked out my latest acquisition from ebay. 83 quid for 17 pocket watches. Which calculates to £4.88 each and not the required 404. Gutted I've not made the mark but very pleased with my purchase. Which includes 6 Ingersol not inc. the boxed one this was a seperate purchase at yesterdays carboot hunt. A kienzle, a cimier, a westclox, an excelsa, a french chronometre, 5 unnamed 4 of which are silver inc. 2 ladies, and a brass full hunter. Some of these ive not been able to get in the back as yet. This comes from the man that wasnt particularly interested in pocket watches that now has a total of 20. Hence Neverenoughwatches, which i may now have to change to neverenoughwatchesandpocketwatches.
    5 points
  17. Epoxy five works but how you apply it and your approch greatly affectes the outcome. To keep the coil perfectly level and unstressed, do as following. 1-Install the balance complete on the mainplate and the cock as normal ( no other part on the mainplate) 2- Fill the stud slot with glue, you can put a bit of glue on tip of a screwdriver and apply it to the slot. 3- Turn the balance to bring the end of the spring near the stud slot and slide its end into the slot. 4- Place the whole assembly cock down on bench. ( cock down because the glue then wont get on the spring in case any of it drips down before it hardens) Let the glue dry . you will have a perfectly level and unstressed coil. The reason you want the balance complete and cock installed as the glue hardens , is because glue hardens around the spring when the spring is level so no need to try leveling the coil after glue hardens. I have done this at least a hundered times, I gurantee you be surprised to see a perfectly level coil Once dried you can scrape off any glue that might have run out of the stud slot. A clean in mineral spirit and quick dip in ISP or one dip. Done. Good luck pal
    5 points
  18. So here it is. I couldnt wait to post this as I'm over the moon with it. I've wanted one since i started collecting. Would you believe i asked the universe for it ( the right way ) two weeks ago. So a couple of weeks ago i was at n.cave e.yorks carboot talking to a guy about watches . He had a couple of non descript clocks that i wasn't interested in but i asked if he had any watches. He said no not with him but at home he had a w.w.w. ( very large clue as to what is coming )wristwatch that he had had fixed but had broke again. I asked if he wanted to sell it and if so bring it in two weeks time when i come back up this way to see my sister. He said ok. He told me it had a blackface and he thought it was an Ingersoll. I wasn't aware Ingersoll made www watches and had never seen one so i thought maybe he's mistaken. So anyway keen to go back yesterday morning, i mooched around the carboot for an hour taming my anxiety and excitement ( i dont like to rush a universal gift, its not respectful and can get taken away as quickly as its given ). In doing that i also picked up a lovely 404ish clock. Eventually i made my way over to the guy's inside stall. Now then matey how's you i said , gud he replied, I've brought you something. He searched through a carrier and i was thinking it cant be much of a watch to chuck it in a carrier bag. A minute of searching and i thought hes forgot it never mind. Ahha he says pulls it out and hands it to me ( the watch ) . I look at it and look at him. Then I look at it, and I look at it , and then I look at it some more. Oh crap its a w10 military watch. He tells me the mainspring has gone, i said no it hasn't, its just fully wound. Have a look inside he said if you want. I had taken a screwback remover a loupe and a piece of rodico with me. I undid the back and peered inside. Its a Record i said, oh at least i know what it is now he said. I had a little prod with the rodico, unfortunately one of the staff pivots had broken, the top one. I said what do you want for it, he gave me his price I'm not saying how much but it was cheap. I said no i cant give you that, so he came down a tenner. I said no i cant give you that either. He said I'm not taking any less that that for it, i said i know your not, your going the wrong way. He looked at me confused, i said take your first price and double it. He looked at me even more confused. Mate its worth more than double what you want , I've got to fix it but I'm happy with that if you are. He wouldn’t take double and we settled in the middle. I gave him his money, we chatted for 15 mins and then shook hands, before i left he said i think i have a couple of pocket watches at home, ill bring them next week, if you come again you can have them. Wow Universe what have i done to deserve your praise. So here it is. As far as i can tell up to now. Its a redialled record dirty dozen (possibly). The movement is the same as the Record DD, the dial serial number relates to the Record. I have yet to date it yet but the movement 022K according to ranfft started being manufactured in the 1920s. Anyone that has some serious knowledge on military watches, i would be so grateful for any help working out what i have here. Here it is i absolutely love ❤ it .
    4 points
  19. Today I'm sporting a blue dialled four hander Accurist quartz alarm. The bezel is only for show and does not rotate, but over all its a very nice little watch. The picture doesn't do justice to the very eye catching deep blue sunburst dial. The alarm is set with the main crown. Turned anticlockwise it sets the alarm hand, and clockwise sets the date. The alarm is enabled and silenced with the button at the 2 O'Clock position.
    4 points
  20. An interesting tour of the Vostok factory. The watches are assembled without gloves! When you get a brand new Vostok, you better do a thorough clean.
    4 points
  21. Featured on the cover of the May/June NAWCC bulletin, this horological engineering marvel includes 71 complications and is just a joy to look at! Details here: https://www.buchananclocks.com/no-6-astronomical-extraordinaire/ (if this has been previously discussed during its 16 year gestation period, I apologize)
    4 points
  22. Today I pulled my 37mm (years 80's design) Seiko 5 off the shelf. It houses the discontinued automatic 21,600bph 7S26C movement, the 3rd generation in the 7S26 movement family (A,B & C). Next to other features, what also is of interest to me is that it has an "Etachron" regulator. Pretty sure the Japanese wouldn't call it an "Etachron". The 7S26A was introduced in 1996 and had a normal regulator. The 7S26B version replaced the 7S26A in 2006 and had an "Etachron" regulator. One can not help but to see the identicality between the Swiss and the Japanese design. Did both producers came with the same idea at the same time or did one "borrowed" the idea of the other?? My father used to wear a Seiko 5 in the 1980's and therefor there are some sentimental reasons too why I bought this "tiny" but nice running, light weight and IMHO good looking watch
    4 points
  23. because the case back does not unscrew. so using that method using the ball would all be a waste of time because all you going to do is break the case back if you try to unscrew it. Then the conventional case wrenches is a mistake especially if you type net tight as you'll just damage the case back. You can use a conventional ranch if you grasp what you're doing but you're probably still do a scratch things up you really need a special case opening tool. By the way this back is actually quite common for Bulova it's the standard back found in most of their tuning fork watches and it comes in two separate sizes. I'll see if I have a picture lurking in the meantime I found a picture of the wrench found in the servicing manual for the tuning fork watch and a picture of the ring found in the parts list for that watch. You have to get the ring off if you want the back off. if not going to find this inside your case but the picture of on the left the wrong type of wrench to use the proper type on the right and why anything trying to remove the back is a waste of time because the back is a little notch and even if you could screw the back itself you still have to get that ring off. then everything am showing as for the normal size ring there is a different looking wrench for the smaller ring found in the ladies version of this watch. But this will give you an idea. Then in case you think this is unique ever buyout a watchmaker you might find old boxer drawer filled with peculiar wrenches like this because there are lots of peculiar case back set come off in peculiar ways. Then not just the case back casing can just get really interesting as there are so many variations.
    4 points
  24. phluxx.. put a bit on a mirror and let it dry off. If there is any oily residue then iys not really suitable. Anilv
    4 points
  25. I've been proudly wearing my recently serviced (and first chrono) Poljot 3133 "Blue Angels" Navitimer. I think it looks great. Although it resembles () another "Navitimer", there is one crucial difference. On this one the bezel does not rotate, so all the scales on the bezel and dial don't do anything - they're just for show. On the Breitling version they work as a circular slide rule for calculating speeds, distances, fuel burn etc. Still, it cost me about 1/15 of the price of an "real" one, so I'm happy. Now, what next? I need to check out those Strela's @Endeavor
    4 points
  26. A billion edits later.... The information here is great. The people here are great. I'm having serious misgivings. This is a poor way to handle people. Or any of it. This forum doesn't work without mods any more than it works without members. We're not paid to generate content either. There must be mutual respect, decency, and courtesy from the top down. I'm fairly certain THAT has no business being considered "policy", but maybe it should. That's about as nice as I can make it.
    4 points
  27. out of curiosity I clicked on one of my emails and looks like we lack permission. Normally in the past when my emails didn't go through it's because the discussion had been relocated to some other section of the message board. Which was always of frustrations try to figure out where the heck it had gone to. Mark only likes happy discussions. In a prior discussion that he closed down I don't remember the exact wording but the quote above is basically right if you're having a problem reach out to the moderators do not discuss it on the message board is basically what was implied. so we can bicker about the type of lubrication were using but don't bicker about the message board as that does not make for a happy message board discussion was my interpretation. Then compared to a lot of other message boards out there with a watch repair as an afterthought in other words there collecting and they just maybe talk about watch repair this one really isn't that bad.
    4 points
  28. The 404 club "probably Le Coultre" pocket watch got a little attention yesterday. It arrived stone dead, fully wound, with a half gallon of wd40 on the surface, so I cleaned as much of that off as possible, let down the mainspring and gave it a few clicks of wind and off it went. It will need a full strip down, clean and service, which I will do when I have time to relax and tackle it with no interruptions. Since parts for this are probably completely unobtainable, I want to take a little extra care with it. This is obviously a quality movement and hopefully once I have it apart, there will be a serial number or some way of identifying its manufacturer with certainty. The case appears to be silver, but so far I haven't found any hallmarks or stamps to prove this.
    4 points
  29. Idea's on the forum policies should be sent to Mark's inbox, not posted on open forum. Some members have mistaken WRT for wattsapp chat, they eventually end up on my " members to ignore" list. Please talk watch repair on WRT forum. Regds
    4 points
  30. OK, this one is done. For the upper jewel, I was UBER careful not to unhinge the spring. Note...in the picture, the hairspring upper left is not part of this watch. I was happily surprised to see my Dad's mark on this watch. He worked on it four times between 1966 and 1978.
    4 points
  31. I'm not highly experienced and I didn't photograph this service enough to give a walkthrough and it was a straightforward thing, going smoothly for the most part. I just wanted to share the only glitch that I got on this one. I used a K&D mainspring winder and I made the mistake of rotating it the wrong way for just a couple of rotations. I then rotated the right way and went all the way through the process and loaded it into a barrel. Once I pulled it away, I saw that the loop end of the MS was completely kinked, folded over on itself. I imagine that rotating the wrong way caused the loop end to fold in under itself and then winding it up in the winder smashed it home. Of course, trying to bend it back caused it to break. I am guessing this could happen with any winder and nothing against the K&D. This picture is before that happened, after cleaning everything: In this photo is the MS that I broke. I had another laying around and used it instead. I couldn't remember where it came from, but I think it was an older one that I had re-loaded into a washer. I just grabbed it and threw it in, but in hindsight, I should have unloaded it and checked it for shape and hygiene before reloading it. You can see from the time graph that the amplitude is on the low side. It drops down to 175º in some positions. But otherwise, it is running well. I think it would be best to replace the mainspring. It will be interesting to see the difference in this amplitude with only that difference. If I do and see a noticeable difference, I'll come back here and update the post. Here's the completed watch, which also needed considerable case work, done a few days ago. What looks like an anomaly on the pic is actually refraction caused by the faceted crystal. From 1975, the Seiko 6106-7729:
    4 points
  32. Remove the balance with the mainspring fully wound. Does the pallet fork flick back and forth enthusistically If you unlock it? If it does, your problem is in the balance assembly, if not, it's in the train. Let the power down again. Take out the pallet fork. Does the escape wheel spin as soon as you try to wind the mainspring? If not, take out the train wheels one by one working back to the barrel to find the blockage.
    4 points
  33. At least you have a microscope to see your third hand. Hehe.
    4 points
  34. I don't have a trinocular scope so I got a cellphone to eyepiece adapter. It works pretty well, other than I can only use one eye while I have it in place. So I have to take it on and off for pictures vs working. Picture from the phone and what the setup is like.
    4 points
  35. Custom made boxes for my watch crystals. Not 100% perfect, but it was my first try and apart from the base plywood it is made out of pallet wood again.
    4 points
  36. One of the best and most easy methods is a strong, at the tip sharpened tweezers and soft wood. It also works with tweezers without that step, just grip the blade strong enough. You will have more control on the result with slight hammer taps instead of just pushing. Frank (A typical drawing of great Jendritzki) ...and in an earlier copy of the same book I found a picture that directly adresses the issue of the bent blade:
    4 points
  37. Hello All, I’m relatively new to watch restoration and repair. I live in Australia. FWIW, over the past months I’ve been experimenting with approaches to ultrasonic cleaning. I wanted to avoid Naphtha and other volatile organic solvents as much as possible, especially in combination with ultrasound. I found a product manufactured by an Australian chemical company - it’s a sodium metasilicate based powder marketed specifically for water-based ultrasound cleaning of small machinery parts, electronic PCBs and jewellery. It’s economical, odorless and rinses without residue, leaving a nice shine. It removes dried, old lubricant very well without pre-soaking. Here’s my cleaning flow: US with the sodium metasilicate based ultrasound solution Rinse in warm water US Rinse in 99% IPA Hand dry with blower while I inspect the parts. The balance and palate fork I clean by hand in Naptha, with special attention to the pivots. I’ve found pushing and twisting the pivots in to a “magic block” white foam cleaning block/eraser to be effective and gentle on the pivots. This is simple, cost-effective and works well for my hobbyist needs. Watch industry standard cleaning products are expensive to source down here. Just though I’d share. Cheers, John in Tasmania.
    4 points
  38. If you look at the documentation that eta has they show it as being pure visual. The only thing they don't quite explain is You open up so you can center the hairspring between the pins but in the document I was looking at they don't explain when you close it just how close you want to go to the hairspring? Then down below I have a link to a book explains how to adjust your watch. You will note they're not using a timing machine they hadn't been invented yet So it's going to take a little bit longer to regulate your watch. Then a PDF extracted from a magazine you might find that of more interest. Then in case the name of the author is not familiar with or to you. He worked his way through the Elgin company becoming the head of research. The watch adjuster's manual [microform] : being a practical guide for the watch and chronometer adjuster in making, springing, timing and adjusting for isochronism, positions and temperatures by Fritts, Charles Edgar https://archive.org/details/cihm_03260 1946-08-HIA-OCR pages 9 to 13 poise Challacombe.pdf
    4 points
  39. This is purely visual. I'm a pretty good regleur, but I work with a guy who is amazing, and the absolute number one "trick" he has is to true and center everything up just like in school. Check the centering with no power. The spring should be centered and not touching either pin. Give it a wiggle and see that it bounces back and forth. Tweak at stud to center, twist pin block to open and close.
    4 points
  40. Check out here for a full video on screw head polishing and blueing including the use of the tool that you have.
    4 points
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