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  1. We made a balance tack in school, but aside from that time I haven't really used it. A much handier tool is this one which was a standard tool made in watchmaking schools here. The "tack" is a threaded pin which can be placed in one of several holes (usually 2 or 3 sizes of tapers on several pins). Choosing an appropriate pin and hole location, the balance isn't hanging as it sits on the table, so no risk to the hairspring. The overarm presses down on the rim, which is supported from the inside by the little "V" so that work can easily be done on screws (it's a non-screw balance in the pic bu
    14 points
  2. Please forgive the poor quality snapshot, but it all came together. I am over the moon! Here's my first completed fordite-dialed watch: I'll provide a more complete write up, better photos, and another completed watch example ASAP.
    8 points
  3. Ok I didn't make a 3D model or anything, but laid out the most important part, the plate. The back piece is 40mm x40mm, the arm can be anything hinged any way just so that it comes down over the balance rim. The support piece for the inside of the rim can also be anything, on the old tools they were V shaped and pressed into a hole, on my friends it's a simple pin that has a notch filed in it. The notch/V permits whatever bit of screw that is sticking out inside the rim to be unharmed when working on it. The threaded holes for the pins are a 2mm thread, but anything near that would be fine.
    7 points
  4. Hey everyone, here's a fun and affordable 3D photography side project. I really owe Andy Hull for giving me the inspiration and information I needed to pull this off! In addition to horology, I'm an avid photographer. I've been studying and practicing photography seriously for 20 years now, having bought my first real camera in 2000. If anyone is curious, the camera was a Canon Canonet QL17 GIII. Some of my work has been in galleries, and I'm a couple of classes away from completing a photography degree. When I became fascinated by photography, I wanted but couldn't afford a digital
    7 points
  5. I am a father of four. And I am still coming 'round to the fact of my oldest daughter, Sophie, having turned 18. She will be the first of them to graduate high school, with honors at that. She has been offered "free rides" recently by a couple universities based on her grades, and has chosen Ball State for its computer science program. And, being eighteen, she immediately registered to vote so that she could (pardon the political post) vote the orange-haired fascist out. She and her friends and fellow classmates seem determined to undo all the injustice, unrest, and damage that has had su
    6 points
  6. You want a hardenable steel, preferably (strongly) in its annealed state. As close to final thickness as possible, as it's a long boring process to work it down. Stick the old part on your blank metal. In school we used soft solder, but you can use superglue or whatever is handy. If you have the broken bit stick it in place as close as you can to its proper position. If you don't have it, you can approximate it from the Bestfit drawing. Now you can drill through the holes in the original part, and saw and file around the perimeter of the old part. One way we were shown was using a
    5 points
  7. Apologies for being uncouth- I've not put in enough effort in the community lately due to a relocation, health issues, children schooling from home, and just the general "2020 malaise" but I've got another beauty in hand that I'd like to share. This is a Jardur Bezelmeter (model 960), probably from around 1945, which I picked up from eBay this week. It cost a pretty penny too but it's a piece that's been on my wishlist for a long time and this particular one ticked all the boxes. The Bezelmeter has an interesting history- from what I have read it was marketed primarily to avia
    5 points
  8. I try selling it at flea market, if no sale, spray it on fleas.
    5 points
  9. I made some parts for this balance tool i Solidworks and 3D print out the parts in PLA a very strong plastic, even case openersw resist the forces, otherwise it is good to make different movements holders.
    4 points
  10. Intro A while back I successfully made my first attempt refitting and adjusting pallet stones using shellac. It was something I had dreaded doing (it seemed difficult) but in the end it wasn’t that difficult at all. Having gathered experience from a few years of handling tiny watch parts using tweezers and having developed some left-hand dexterity as well (I’m right handed) probably helped. Anyway, I thought I’d share the experience with anyone who would be interested and hopefully there’ll be some other WR-talker, now or in the future, who’ll find it useful. If you’re new to th
    4 points
  11. Hello everyone, isn't it a great skill in its own right to be able to make precision watchmaking tools. This little beauty is a balance poising tool with a sliding base and spring loaded vice to hold balance wheel in different position while you remove material from the balance wheel underside or rim side. The hand held cutter is sharpened by hand. I have used it on pocket watch and vintage wrist watch to make new balance out of scrap parts. But only once combined with hairsping vibrating tool for 18000 bph watches. A lot of fiddly work, but can be done VID_20201129_094512.mp4
    4 points
  12. I don't know of any real name for it. Here it's "the school balance holder thing", or le truc de l'ecole pour tenir le balancier et pont haha. With all the options for placing the pin there's never a risk of stressing the spring except when you get lazy and don't move it. I use it on pocket watches all the way down to Lecoultre 101- no way in a million years I'd touch a 101 balance without this tool! With all the interest I'll take some better pics and try to make a dimensioned sketch for those who want to make one.
    4 points
  13. Very Rare "Mystery Dial" battery powered and never needs winding. Only 3 easy payment of $19.99 but wait there is more! figured it was time to decompress
    4 points
  14. I think I would be inclined to start a bit further around the outer coil, perhaps at about 5 o'clock in your pics, and gently coax the outer coil outwards as you spiral out in a clockwise direction. As it is that outer coil is deviating inwards from about the 5 o'clock position until it is touching the next coil in at about 7 o'clock. It needs to run parallel to the next coil in right up to the dogleg. If you sort that part of the coil out you will probably find that the terminal curve is very much closer to correct than it currently appears.
    4 points
  15. Thank you for clearing that up.
    4 points
  16. Yeah, I've tried a few things: brass scarf, powdered marble, brass plates, etc. If I've learned anything about bluing steel, is that what works well for one person won't necessarily work for another person. I'm able to consistently and cleanly blue hands, but the much larger surface area of the chapter ring is a significantly greater challenge. If anyone wants to learn how to blue hands or screws, the most foolproof and consistent method I'd recommend would be to use an inexpensive (<$100) precision-controlled digital soldering station with some sort of brass heating platform attached.
    4 points
  17. Introducing anything magnetic into the work space when repairing watches is a no no I cannot see where it would be useful to have such a mat in watch repair. The only magnet I have is for those unfortunate times when a part does ping off into the distance I do a sweep of the floor with a magnet finds the part 99% of the time. Now if your a big tea drinker I have a Chocolate teapot for sale somewhere.
    4 points
  18. Quick shot of my 3rd finished fordite-dialed Seiko. I'm making a push to get my first production run of 10 out, and then I'll be focusing on adding the chapter rings and making some ETA 6498-compatible fordite dials.
    4 points
  19. precision timekeeping involves more than poising. The watch has to be running correctly in the first place as poising is not going to fix problems of the watch having a problem. statically poising is the balance wheel itself without the hairspring. It's always good to start here if you think you have a problem. then as pointed out previously you can have the balance wheel in the watch and notice positional error but they show up much better if you have an actual poising tool. dynamic poising is not a substitution for proper static poising. I tend to think of it more for people obsess
    4 points
  20. Hi all, I have been using this Meyers movement holder no58 that I perchased here in Australia for a while now and I must say, they don't make things like they use to. It's easy to set up and it holds all movements regardless of sizes, shapes or form. I have a Seiko 6309 plate in there that I just jeweled the barrel arbor port in there and the other movement plate is an omega 485 ladies movement plate. It has 4 different clamps that slide in and a quick release button where my finger is. It does not rock or come loose. The movements have no sharp corners intruding into the plate because the cla
    4 points
  21. Of the link is permissible, I’ll share it - buywatchparts.com. (I know, couldn’t believe the domain was available) I’m new to the online store thing, but have lots of ideas to improve and grow it in the future. If anyone does visit, any feedback on ways to improve it are always welcome!
    4 points
  22. After the loss of my wonderful girl Cookie around 10 months ago. I have taken the plunge and on Friday 6th I received my two 9 week old black and white kittens. So I welcome you to say hello to Freddie & Buster. Freddie is the one with both black ears and very pink nose. Buster is the one with one white ear and his nose is pink & black. Here are a few photos of the little devils.
    4 points
  23. Quick update: I've cut my first series of fordite veneers, and I'm in the fun-but-difficult stage of assembling my first run of dials. Here's a scan of my first workable batch of fordite sections (ranging in thickness from 0.3mm to 0.5mm). The final patterns of these will change, as I'll be grinding them down to their final height. (This is a good thing, as some of the patterns below are pretty uninspiring. It'll also be heartbreaking, as some of my favorites below will likely shift too.) It's coming together!
    4 points
  24. Hi again! I'm Chris and I'm a total noob here. I posted an introduction that will give more back story to what I'm doing here and what I hope to accomplish. So the following are watches that I inherited about 15 years ago and that have been wondering around my garage in a box waiting for me to do something about them. Most aren't very valuable, at least I'm guessing that Timex's aren't collectors items, how ever they might be the perfect brand for a noob to start of with. I dunno, maybe they're not even worth that, that's why I'm going to post everything I got. But I also know that a few
    3 points
  25. That Timex has a cool dial! I put the old 1680 away again and dug out this gem. It has to be one of the nicest dive watches available today, regardless of cost. Polishing that puts the Swiss to shame; stainless case WITH hard coating to avoid scratches; sapphire crystal; silky and precise bezel “action”; retro 62MAS inspired styling; bomb-proof Seiko movement and construction. I highly recommend it. I wear it on an Isofrane dive strap (navy blue) that looks so right on this watch.
    3 points
  26. This is the dashboard clock my father pulled from his 1966 Chevrolet El Camino earlier this year. The clock didn't run at all and he asked me to take a look at it. Knowing nothing about automotive clocks I was intrigued and rushed over to pick it up. It's a simple affair with just two hands and a knob to adjust the time. No winding is necessary. On the back of the clock housing is a single 12 volt connection- the housing itself must ground the clock when installed in the dash. Stamped on the rear housing are the words Borg Instruments, Delavan Wis. The housing is removed
    3 points
  27. My advice: leave it alone unless there is a compelling reason to remove it. Older Rolex (15xx) works this way too, and those parts, though easy to find, command silly prices. So, I suggest ultrasonic cleaning (even though mine is busted), then careful oiling with the finest oiler as required. A "compelling reason" to remove it might be a broken jewel/worn bushing for instance. And re-installing it correctly without a jeweling kit probably wouldn't go perfectly. I understand you can't always ascertain that without full disassembly, but sometimes you have to punt.
    3 points
  28. It's a similar principle I use to distribute the levering pressure when removing something friction fitted, such as a friction fitted minute wheel on the top of a barrel on a Baumgartner 866
    3 points
  29. First of all the inner part of the bearing will be particularly hard steel, so drilling with anything other than carbide will be quite difficult. Then, is this a new bearing? Or new rotor? Did the nut not fit before? Easiest thing would be to modify the nut, but will need a lathe for that. If you really want to drill it, and have tools that will cut it, then fill the race with super glue. Drill. Soak in acetone to remove super glue (do one to remove, and then a clean soak to get any remaining residue).
    3 points
  30. The other day I was thinking about when I was a watchmaker and I was having problems with my posture and my neck. I was diagnosed with very sever spondylitis and was told the wear in the bones in my neck come close to someone in there 70’s I was only in my early 30’s at the time. My neck would lock and I was unable to move my head. The bones would rub each other because in some of my vertebral cartilage was none existent this also caused bad headaches and tightening of the muscles in my neck, it felt like my head was about to fall off. I had a Therapeutic counselor come around and have a look
    3 points
  31. Hairpsring out of one might be incompatable with the balance out of the other. But lets get the hairspring sorted out first.
    3 points
  32. For the past few months, I’ve been working on a custom dial project. I’m still not ready to show my first production examples, but the project has gotten to the point where I’m comfortable sharing my progress. I’ve been documenting this process, and am committed to sharing my process notes. I believe in open source information, and I’ve benefited immensely in watches (and in life generally) from the wisdom and experience of other people who have been willing to share what they know with me. My hope is that by sharing my process notes, I might be able to encourage other folks to take a risk and
    3 points
  33. I use stock hands or aftermarket hands, depending on what I think looks good. I tend to use stock hands (with their awesome lumibrite) more, but sometimes I switch it up. I'd like to say that this is always an intentional choice, but sometimes I fumble the hand installation and break a factory hand. I've gotten way better at installing watch hands, but I'm still not perfect. I am considering purchasing a Horotec Watch Tool Hand Press after a particularly painful and expensive loss of a handset from a watch I really liked. I'll be posting separately on this. No plans for indices, lumed or
    3 points
  34. I keep wearing this:
    3 points
  35. Is it available with an exhibition back?
    3 points
  36. Okay I really need one of you to start a company where I can just call you up and tell you all the watch parts I need and you run around like an idiot and try to find them. Let me know when your new company is up and running please. I have a long list.
    3 points
  37. Cock screw is the one that holds the cock down on mainplate, in cases you suspect end stones might be pushing on pivot end( no or very little end shake) you can releive such possible pressure on end stones by loosening the said screw, if the are no end stones, the jewel itself can be pushing on shoulder seat of the pivot. Shelac is the stuff that acts like glue but wont hurt the base metal over time, it is used on fork pallets jewels to keep them from moving in fork slot, nearly all petrolium base cleaning solutions dissolve shelac rendering pallet jewels loose to move in the fork slot, w
    3 points
  38. My mentor taught me a trick which he learnt from his Swiss master. Wrap a tiny blob of Rodico on a pegwood, like a Q-tip. You'll save a whole lot more of the stuff. And change it more often. He also told me that the stuff from stationery stores, like Faber Castell's, work perfectly well, and at a fraction of the price of Rodico.
    3 points
  39. Hi Mike I used the same stuff (typeclean) when servicing typewriters may years ago for cleaning the type heads once it was used up and dirty it went in the bin. The old stuff from using on watches can be reused for holding parts on the bench when measuring or other like tasks but the bin is where it usually ends up. Premium Rodico is likly to be an altered formula designed to remove money from your pocket it will be a bit more tacky so it collects more dollars/pounds .
    3 points
  40. Hi Yasser right, Have a look via the search function . top right on the home screen. use the phrase ""BFG 866 walk through"" then scroll down the results and look for Jon "Baumgartner BFG 866 Walk through" Jon did quite a comprehensive walk through the diss assembly and re assembly of the BFG 866. A study of his posts will give you the information In graphic detail. It is very Good
    3 points
  41. Some pictures of the Beta LCD watch that I posted in the 404 club thread. LCD modules are actually pretty easy to work with if you can use small screwdrivers, magnification and perhaps occasionally solder or conductive paint. Generally there is not much you can do with faulty LCD modules other than clean everything. They rely on a 'black blob" to do all the clever stuff, and a quartz crystal to keep the time. The blob cannot be replaced, but sometimes the crystal can. In this particular case, I did do a little light surgery to the board, which had a corner cracked off it. The t
    3 points
  42. @MechanicMike: Right now, I'm using a propane camp stove with a 6" x 6" x 1" block of aluminum to help with heat evenness. Another shot: I'm working on improving my watch photography too!
    3 points
  43. I spent the best part of 3 or so hrs trying to fit the balance wheel, it appeared stiff not wanting to oscillate, at first I assumed that I hadn't seated the pivots in the bearings and I removed and refitted it many times, on the odd occasion it appeared a bit freer and more likely to oscillate but still not right, the balance cock alignment pins are tight I thought maybe the balance cock was not going down square, maybe I had broken one or both of the pivots, not sure how firmly I need to press down the balance cock onto the alignment pins, I removed the balance cock and let it hang from the
    3 points
  44. Well I've started on my knocked up poise tool that seems to be going quite well. I think I have identified at least two heavy spots. I think the blades might be slightly magnetised as the balance can get pulled towards the blades, so I will address that later before I start taking any weight of the balance. VID_20201110_085935368.mp4
    3 points
  45. Here are my two completed fordite-dialed watches. I didn't install their second hands 'cause I wanted to show more of the dials. I've got lots more in the pipeline.
    3 points
  46. Hi! Haven't had much time for watchmaking practice, for way to long time!! But finally!!! Well almost done with the st 96 project. First started. And first finished. And, im very pleased! I have to say, it was very frustrating at times. Many small issues. Most done by my own "fine" work.. I did source a replacement balance. Or, I got offered by a gentleman. So, I did install it. But the watch did not run very clean at all. With low aptitude. Was a bit concerned, to say at least. But I managed to get it to work reasonable on the timegrapgher. So I decided to b
    3 points
  47. Solved by the wisdom of my wife. She said to use a hair blower on the socket and then push it it. It worked amazingly. The manufacturer should recommend this as punching it, jumping in and and taking a sludge hammer to it did not work. Simple wife trick...that’s why we have to listen to our significant other from time to time...and I’m the Engineer:)
    3 points
  48. All I’m suggesting is that we control what we can, with the greatest accuracy possible, to better understand the things we cannot control.
    3 points
  49. Move house? Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    3 points
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