Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 01/28/2021 in all areas

  1. Thought I'd share another triumph, for me anyway. I'm still new to this game and don't have a dedicated work space and only functional tools. Picked up this 1970's "30" jewelled automatic wonder just before Christmas. It wasn't without issues. In it's past someone had poured a load of oil into it (smelt a bit on opening) and it took a while to clean it all by hand, soaking this and pegging that. I was lucky enough to find parts which proved invaluable and educational. I even plucked up courage and practised removal and lubricating shock jewels which was a first for me, still have a healt
    7 points
  2. This is just a beautify watch and I have to share a pic. Comes from watchmakers personal collection. I scan see why he held on to it.
    7 points
  3. Battery and crystal change for 100% bio local produce. I'm happy, what do you think?
    6 points
  4. Here is my setup with copious magnification! I am now at the point of being dangerous. Quality tools in the hands of an amateur. When I was a kid, I would often play with this lathe, but never developed any skill...just had fun turning brass rods.
    5 points
  5. There is an old thread here that shows a YouTube vid of how to remove the EtaChron stud from the stud support, which I think is a bad idea, as there is too much downwards pressure on the stud support when using tweezers. It can be done that way, but isn't ideal, especially when working on a clone movement where the stud support isn't as strong as an ETA movement. I put a lesson together for my class at https://efhc.org.uk/wordpress/index.php/centre-facilities/ to show how to do it without risking damage to the stud support and how to save over £60 making your own tools to perform this tas
    5 points
  6. My career has spanned several startups and nearly as many industries and areas of expertise. Previous business ventures have had varying degrees of success and failure, and more often than not failure boils down to one or more partners dropping a ball in a big way. Similarly, I've had to answer to investors and big money types, and while it's nice to have the funds, I'd prefer to not have to answer to them either if I can avoid it (also, I get to keep all the money I make, so that's better too). For the past two and a half years, I've been working on a new technology that is lightyears ah
    5 points
  7. Hello watch guys, I finally finished my pilot build with my handmade dial. Now I don’t have to buy an IWC. What do you think?
    5 points
  8. I think these yellow things are great. https://www.cousinsuk.com/product/compartment-tray-revolving They stack on top of each other and you only need to uncover the compartment you're working with.
    5 points
  9. Longines Super Thin 1970, caliber 428, 17J
    5 points
  10. It has been a bit of saga but worth it. Finally cut a screw for the 8 days French alarm clock. One of the four to fasten the pillars to the base, three were missing. I am almost sure that all its sizes are in French lignes, to begin with the pitch of 4 threads per ligne (0.564mm). The head is 2 x 1 exactly. The pitch is easy to get if your lathe has a bunch of gears. But the profile is another story, antique threads have rounded crests and valleys. I can only hypotize on how that could be reproduced in an home shop - not easily. Anyway, just like my Swiss-exiled counselor has confir
    4 points
  11. I figured I'd post the watch that started me on this journey. It really is quite gorgeous. I saved the photos from the original ebay listing. The listing said, "ART DECO 1930s BULOVA ENGRAVED CASE WATCH NEAR MINT" I've since learned that the watch is not from the 1930's but is a 1928 Surrey. Also, not mentioned in the listing is that it was recased in an Illinois Watch Co. case. I actually like this case much more than the original Surrey case so I can't really complain about that. The only real issue is that the movement just kind floats in the case since the movement isn't actually atta
    4 points
  12. With a set blued steel mainspring that's in desperate need of being replaced you can still verify that a watch is functional and you would have more than 160° of amplitude. At least for a little while it's not going to have the running time of a mainspring that's in proper condition. You repeating pattern could be magnetism or something in the gear train. I'm attaching an image it will differ depending upon the gear ratios of the particular watch but ill give you an idea. Then the picture came out of a manual for timing machine. Even though it's an older machine 90% of the manual is st
    4 points
  13. You can't get into dissecting anything on the graph until the amplitude is up, you'll want at least 250 degrees, better 270-280. What could be causing the low amplitude is a laundry list of things. -was the train free, did it move freely with just 1 or 2 clicks of wind and did the escape wheel reverse when it came to a stop? -endshakes all good? -mainspring and barrel in good condition? -pallet fork snaps cleanly to its bankings with just a few clicks of wind? -balance pivots in good shape, all jewels in good shape, hairspring in good shape? -did you peg jewels,
    4 points
  14. The difference between 19800 and 18000 is 1800 beats per hour. That is the difference of 360 seconds or -6 minutes an hour (based on a 18000bph standard) or about -5 minutes 25-30 seconds (based on a 19800bph standard). So you theory that the wrong balance complete was used is very likely. I suspect if a 19800 balance complete was installed you issue would resolve. Let us know how it goes.
    4 points
  15. Most watchmaker lathes have plain bearings. The majority are hard steel spindle on hard steel stationary bearings, some have bronze bearings and some cast iron. Almost all are adjustable for wear (the only one I know of with no provision for radial wear is the Steiner design). All of these are what is known as "constant loss" lubrication. That means you put oil in the bearing, and it works its way out during use- either from gravity, or being slung onto your shirt. The downside it you have to check and top up the oil frequently. The upside is they are very tolerant of lubrication differences.
    4 points
  16. Hi all, here's a handy balance tac that allows you to steady the balance while you work on it. Made of solid brass and fully adjustable for height, balance size and length of balance cock. It has a rubber mat glued to the underside combined with its weight makes it very sturdy. VID_20210218_125547.mp4
    4 points
  17. These have been passed to me by a distinguished forum member that is too busy to post at the moment - he's working on a mov. t so small that all its sizes are actually negative numbers. I have a couple. Both work, the second one seems to be more forgiving in use. They both contain: silver nitrate, cream of tartar (potassium bitartrate), and regular salt, and the second one has a little alum (potassium alum). The combinations are by weight. 1st formula: 1 part silver nitrate 2 parts cream of tartar 2 parts salt 2nd: 1 part silver nitrate 8 pa
    4 points
  18. I left the mouse damage because it has a little charm. I will replace the 2 broken pulleys and when I'm ready to use the lathe I'll clean ans polish moving surfaces but leave the rest alone. All tools shown came with the bench.
    4 points
  19. Todays find. $425 plus $25 to help me put it in the truck. Came with a Moseley foot pedal lathe and other goodies. I'll post more photos as I go through things. It came out of Otto E. Loven Optometrist and Jeweler"s store in Forest Park Ill. Phone forest 115.
    4 points
  20. Brass wants zero rake angle. If you are turning it on a lathe that means that your tool will have flat top (or close to it) rather than say a 15ish degree angle for steel. With a drill, the rake is built into the twist. So, you do what's called "dubbing", which is to put a flat on the cutting edge that's in line with the body of the drill. You are making a zero rake cutting edge, and even if very small, makes a big difference in brass. If you don't do it, it wants to sort of screw itself into the work, grabbing and sometimes breaking, or with sheet brass grabbing and spinning it ar
    4 points
  21. Intro A while back I successfully made my first attempt refitting and adjusting pallet stones using shellac. It was something I had dreaded doing (it seemed difficult) but in the end it wasn’t that difficult at all. Having gathered experience from a few years of handling tiny watch parts using tweezers and having developed some left-hand dexterity as well (I’m right handed) probably helped. Anyway, I thought I’d share the experience with anyone who would be interested and hopefully there’ll be some other WR-talker, now or in the future, who’ll find it useful. If you’re new to th
    4 points
  22. OK, I am gonna call this one "done" for now at least. I cleaned up the case, polished the crystal, installed a battery. It ran all night and kept perfect (to my resolution. This watch does not command any value on Ebay, but it is a very nice movement and kinda pretty. I set it to the right day, but did not want to have to go around to the correct date.
    4 points
  23. I thought I'd like to share with you the first watch that I bought which kickstarted my obsession. It's an IWC Borgel cased officer's trench watch dated 1916 with a Cal 64 movement. The dial has faint lettering for an Edinburgh retailer and I haven't been able to decipher the initials on the back.
    4 points
  24. Hi @aoleite. I'm conscious I'm in danger of just repeating what Joe has already said but noting you're a newcomer let me expand a bit on Joe's information: - Watches usually come in 'families'. So a watch movement will typically have a base model. Additions - auto wind mechanism, day, date and so forth give rise to different model numbers in that family. But typically they are building on a base. - In terms of finding useful information on a movement, and that family information, then the ranfft.de website is a goldmine! - Here's the information for your movement as an example: ht
    4 points
  25. I don’t understand why you would make such a comment here. It seems strangely out of place.
    4 points
  26. At this point, I walked away for an hour or so. I came back with the theory that there was a break in the circuit somewhere and my speculation was that it was along the contact point spring and associated interconnections. So, here is where I focused. I did not take a picture of the insulating washer on the bottom. Interesting feature. Insulation on top keeps the screw out of the electrical path. The copper ring underneath connects point A to point B. I removed it. It appeared to have some slight discoloration (oxidation on the PCB trace). I just reinstalled and cranke
    4 points
  27. The BB Crystal Company set that you have got on the left is for installing armoured or tension ring crystals. These have a metal ring on the inside of the crystal to keep the sides of the crystal rigid, so using a crystal lift like the Electro-Vise or the Bregeon would be very difficult. The sides of the crystal, and the sides of the rebate into which the crystal fits are parallel, and the crystal is fractionally larger than the rebate, such that when it is installed it is a tight interference fit. The flat dies go on the bottom to support the case, and the inside rim on the upper dies are bev
    4 points
  28. Now it was time to fit the shape of the new clamp to the movement and then bend it so it would perform the intended function and then do the final fitting. You can see the range of colors that result form the heating and quenching in one of the photos. Ever more careful and fine filing and continual testing against the movement until the tip of the clamp fit into the movement. Then simple bending and adjusting of length and trial fitting again until voila! A new clamp that holds nice and solid. This was a fun bit of adaptation and using the know qualit
    4 points
  29. For small hole drilling you'll see massive rpm recommendations, this for the theoretical sfm or surface feet per minute. The upside is the tool manufacturers who researched this are right. The downside is to get the cut you want in~0.4mm of material at say 10krpm you have to feed at 50mm per minute, or 0.8mm per second to get that, which is undoable without a cnc machine. You have to get through your piece in 0.5 seconds, otherwise the drill will be rubbing rather than cutting which will dull it and work harden the steel part and you press harder and something breaks. The up-upside
    4 points
  30. Today is perhaps my favorite; CWC RN Diver mk1 automatic. Nice and simple and it fits my wrist especially well.
    4 points
  31. I bought a slightly modded Seiko SKX007 off of eBay, about which in general a more experienced man than I here aptly quoted Obi Wan Kenobi: "you will never find a more wretched hive of scum and villainy." LOL. To be fair, the watch was accurately described cosmetically, more or less, but I didn't take the time to read the description. One thing that wasn't entirely accurate was the representation that the watch "works well." Well, it did run, but not to expectations. The amplitude was low, the beat error high and the rotor felt sluggish. So what's a newby to do? Well, a full service of
    4 points
  32. The watch of the day for me is my father-in-law's 1957 Bulova Sea King, not be confused with Seamasters of the same vintage lol. After he passed we had it serviced and it runs very well. It was given to my eldest son who wore it for awhile until he decided that 32mm was too small for his muscular early-20s shot-putter's "guns" (arms). I keep it in the rotation on my wrist, patiently ticking away the seconds until he decides that is is cool again; maybe a few decades form now. Then it will return to him.
    4 points
  33. Seiko meca quartz movement. Quite impressed for £50
    4 points
  34. I think Michael1962 is on the money and as Old Hippy says you wont be there anyway, What could she do, Bury you , burn you put you out for compost. You are safe from an ear bashing, on the other hand she might be rubbing her hands over your shrewd investment and thinking what she can invest the cash in, like a nice holiday a new wardrobe of clothes, Hmm make sure she goes first.
    3 points
  35. This may help you after you have assembled the movement
    3 points
  36. A rather scruffy Casio CS-831 is on its way. Released in 1983 with a stainless steel case, and Casio build quality, these were arguably the must have calculator watch of the day, and one of those gadgets that I nearly bought, back then but couldn't justify the price for at the time. Well there is no problem with the price of this one, it easily will make it in to the 404 club, assuming I can get it working and make it look a little more presentable. I'm not sure the bracelet is original, but I have a couple of suitable Casio bracelets in the junk pile if it isn't.
    3 points
  37. Lemania chrono? first attempt to service.? You are a brave man. Welcome to the forum. Regs Joe
    3 points
  38. I just sold a Vostok project that required work on numerals. I taped a little piece of sandpaper to the end of my pegwood with double-sided tape and very carefully removed tarnishing. Then I used a combination of rodico, precision qtips, and automotive buffing compound to polish. Finished with a few coats of pen electroplating silver.
    3 points
  39. For full plate watches you really need an escapement matching tool. This is sort of a movement holder and depthing tool in one; there are 3 (sometimes only 2 but 3 is best) arms that carry runners that can be accurately aligned with the balance, escape wheel and pallet fork pivot locations. The plate is put in place (well, upper plate), then the components with one end supported by a runner. You can then check the escapement functions in full view.
    3 points
  40. So after 5 months I managed to have 3 working and restored wingmans. Got all three. The gold, the silver and the black one. Original straps, same from the catalogue. If you look closer the black one has black buttons. So those black buttons have been 3d printed in resin and they look really cool. Pretty close to OEM. The black one still need the bezel's insert. And for the silver one that is not in the photos still polishing the glass. The last thing I need to do in all them after that is just a case back gasket as none of them passed the pressure test. The black one was
    3 points
  41. Welcome to the forum Andrei. I'm from America, where we pronounce everyone's name wrong, but I can still type it correctly.
    3 points
  42. I always refer P G tips as monkey tea, all due to those lovely adverts with the chimps. My favourite is the removeles and the piano. For those that don't know what I'm talking about look at this.
    3 points
  43. Hi Joe! I don't know the actual regulations (legal or whatever) surrounding the number of adjustments. What I do know is the U.S. imposed tariffs on foreign watches that were adjusted, to protect the domestic market. So now when I get a beautiful Lecoultre on the bench marked unadjusted and then unfailingly with a cryptic 3 letter code on a bridge, it was intended for the U.S. market. I believe some makers just marked everything unadjusted as a simplifying measure for this reason. Marking a movement as adjusted in any way just knocked out a major market. High grade pieces from
    3 points
  44. LOL, last night my neighbor was over for happy hour and I am telling her about my watchmaking renaissance. She says she has this watch that belonged to her grandmother...wondering about it. So she runs it over today and hands it to me to check out. Oh my!
    3 points
  45. I have checked his post history and I find no issue with @toptime810, he has stated publicly in previous posts that he does not sell a service. Anybody spamming this board does not last here long - he has been a member here for almost 6 years. So may I respectfully ask that you please give him the benefit of the doubt that he was just making friendly conversation Very nice watch by the way.
    3 points
  46. Hi there, my name is Brandon (as you may have guessed) from the San Diego area of California. I’m admittedly not a watchmaker, nor have any sort of engineering mind. I’m hoping the members here can answer a question from me from time to time regarding watchmaking. My primary focus these days in collections is the Independent Watchmakers and enjoy some of my older pieces in my collection from the Big Brands. Cheers, Brandon
    3 points
  47. Pedant note: a mobile phone can never be a timegrapher. A real albeit cheap machine doesn't have this problem, you place the watch on the stand fully closed and in any position, and it will read fine even if there is some other noise or music in the room. A sensitive but selective device.
    3 points
  48. I'm allergic to both (what most people consider badly allergic to dogs, and super seriously allergic to cats), but have always had dogs until just over a year ago. My last dog I got in college, and he died two weeks after my daughter was born. He was old and blind (no eyes). Sweetest, friendliest dog ever. Did not discriminate; everyone was a friend and worthy of being ran into softly (his version of a hug). My wife's office is dog friendly (or was when people went there), and he was very much a favorite. Even other dog owners and emphatically non-dog people told her he was their favorite offi
    3 points
  49. I imagine your zinc isn't the issue. What grit is the diamond powder? What type of oil are you using? The mixture should be thick, like twice as thick as peanut butter. Natural plant oil is better than mineral oil. The plate should have a textured surface, like from a very coarse file. It does have to be clean of course, and it's good to keep a file that is only used to dress the plate. When polishing you want the paste to dry out. If it's wet the grains can ball up and give you scratches. It will get to a sort of "magic" state where it's just dry enough but not too dry. Some guys
    3 points
  50. Imado 1970s AS 2600 movement. Love the instant day/date change in this model, very un-Seiko like. Grey/brown dial. Plated brass case.
    3 points
×
×
  • Create New...