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  1. Hi All, I started this forum over 10 years ago and never intended for it to me a 'for profit' concern. Since then, I launched an online course and I draw funds from that business in order to fund this website. There is also a little bit of funding from Google ads but I don't rely on it because they keep changing the goalposts. The forum costs a few hundred pounds per month to run and Im comfortably managing it. Why a few hundred pounds? I am OCD about backups and not relying on a single company to host those backups, I use amazon S3 to backup hourly and daily, I also use Digital Ocean. I use a separate mail service to handle the serious amounts of emails sent from the site, I am on here most days admin'ing and updating the site or servers/applying security patches and the like - its not a big deal, I enjoy it. In short - you might not see me a lot posting (for my sanity as it's addictive (same on all my social media)) but I certainly do a lot behind the scenes. I can't control my mortality and so there's always that - but other than that, I'm damn committed to this site as I am committed to my commercial site watchfix.com which supports this site. I have no interest in shutting down, selling or otherwise changing this sites format. Having said that, if anyone wants to consider taking on moderation tasks to help (in particular, making sure people post in the correct place and moderating new members posts) that would be very helpful. (Only members who have been active for more than a year please). Finally, thanks very much for your support and kind words - I truly appreciate that. This forum has to be one of the friendliest I am part of - a massive refreshment after reading some of the Facebook groups I'm part of - except mine FB group - that's also great with great people
    13 points
  2. I should have done this a long time ago. I would like to say a big thank you to all my followers new and old. If I can help in any way just message me and I will do my very best for you.
    10 points
  3. This is the clock I was talking about.
    9 points
  4. Alright, the job is done. I first filed down the stubs flat. I then used a Proxxon hand drill first with a 0.5mm bit to score a point to work from, then a 1mm drill bit to properly drill out some lug holes. I just went slowly, checking the depth as I went. I drilled the inside of the lugs, leaving the outsides unblemished. I was worried that drilling at an angle might be a problem, but it turned out fine. Lug holes don't need to be very accurate, so it was actually easy to create holes to easily accommodate a spring bar. The result is a 'good enough' outcome that worked for me. Thanks for your help everyone, loving the hobby so far. I learn so much with each project.
    7 points
  5. You are so true on a lot of what you have said. The main reason for changing the mainspring even if the old one is in good order is because it will take out your thinking that the mainspring is contributing to poor power output or fluctuations in amplitude. If a new spring is fitted that box can be crossed off as a potential source of a problem. Most customers are happy to pay the extra £20 for a new mainspring if they are already parting with a couple of hundred pounds for a service. A new spring is an investment for good running for the future.
    6 points
  6. Yeah you need more amplitude, and if this is full wind a new mainspring isn't going to get you there- there are other issues. Good news is if that's your max delta at this miserable amplitude it will probably run great when you get it up to something normal!
    6 points
  7. The K&D (Levin made the same style too, probably others as well) are a clever design and work well when you get used to them. The only issue is if you wind the spring so that the tongue goes in, there's a really good chance it slips futher and then comes out the next slot, usually breaking off. Best to size it so you can fit it in the barrel with the tongue sticking out.
    6 points
  8. Tah-dah. A mini blow torch to harden it, then quench it and just a lighter held under a brass mainspring barrel that the part sits in to temper, Its important to wipe off any grease from fingerprints with ipa, you might be able to see i missed a bit at the top of the arm. Its a very satisfying process. I now just need to deal with the more difficult repairs, anybody any good at replacing rubbed in jewels ?
    6 points
  9. 1947 NOS Ambassador 'C'. Actually, the case came without the movement so the movement isn't NOS, but she sure is pretty.
    6 points
  10. I put this quick vid together today when I was replacing the tropic crystal on this Rolex Oyster Perpetual. It wasn't the greatest filming, but hey!
    5 points
  11. The cleaner smells of ammonia, but it's not too bad; just keep it covered as far as practical. I use an ultrasonic machine on a kitchen worktop. The rinse does not smell strongly, it's vaguely like paraffin. I did check the safety data sheets before buying it & it's said to be safe in normal use. My dedicated watch cleaning machine is still a work-in-progress; four position linear, based on 1L kilner jars for station spacing, to have a heated dryer in position 4. It uses standard, readily available parts as far as possible to make it easy to reproduce, plus 3D printed bits for the custom parts. (The horizontal drive motor is out at the moment while working on the stepper drive software)
    5 points
  12. Just picked this up earlier today. This find just about epitomizes vintage watch collecting for me and what really keeps me going. Hit 2 antique malls today and saw a couple of pieces at the first one but just nothing that I needed. At the second one saw a Accutron 218 but it was 20 minutes behind the actual time. These "malls" have numerous booths of a variety of sellers who likely go in once or twice a week. Considering that that watch should be within a couple of seconds a month, I figured it hadn't been phased so passed on that for now knowing it would need work to run correctly and the price tag. Then I found this Excelle in a display case. I never heard of the brand, but in was an auto and had a little heft. It turned out to be 40mm lug to lug, 35.3mm case width, and 12.3 mm thick. On the spiedel once size fits most flex band. At $10.80US with tax I immediately pulled the trigger with nothing to lose. Before pictures: I spent a nice 30 minutes taking it out of the case and running that through the ultra sonic replacing the crystal and gasket and recasing, but spent five minutes first getting it running close on the timegrapher. Had a new crystal already in stock. I probably could have sanbed and polished the old one, but for $3 there is nothing like a new acrylic that makes a watch pop, in my opinion. The caseback gasket was hardened and just glad it wasn't tar. Changed that as well. Here is the after Pic on a temp black strap while I decide on a leather or steel bracelet. An added bonus was doing some research and finding out the Elgin connection and the movement is a PUW 1563T which is German I am pretty sure and probably why it doesn't say Swiss made on the dial. This movement is supposed to have a hack feature and quickset date by pushing the crown. But neither of those complications seem to be working. Not sure if the stem is cut too short because there is no gap for the crown to move. Either way at some point will need to be serviced and check the keyless works to find out what is going on with the quickset and hack of the sweep second hand.
    5 points
  13. Is magnetism such a major problem that we (as home hobbyists) need to spend $$$ on a fancy demagnetiser? I use one of the cheap blue Chinese demagnetisers (£10 from ebay). It works, and has never failed to demagnetise a movement, or my screwdrivers. Magnetometer - who needs one? Take a very small screw. If it sticks to the clean part, it is magnetised
    5 points
  14. The front, runs lovely now and alarms works great.
    5 points
  15. A big thank you Mark for clearing all this up. We all appreciate you and the work you put into the running of this forum. If I can be of anymore help to you and this forum just ask. I love it on here as well.
    5 points
  16. I existed before the term mechatronics engineer existed. I had to combine electricity, electronics, pneumatics, hydraulics and computing just to keep my own equipment working. I have never sub contracted any of my own repairs to the suppliers because I know I could do a better job. For a long time, dental suppliers in my country would bring their dead equipment to me that their own engineers cannot handle. I have accidentally embarrassed a couple of hospital heads of engineering by demonstrating their inadequacy. I think mechatronics is the most under-appreciated, under valued of all the engineering sciences. I had a part-time dental assistant about 25 years ago, who was studying mechatronics in the polytechnic. She was absolutely clueless about the job prospects for a mechatronics engineer. I asked her about her aspirations and she replied that she really wanted to work in the games industry. In our dental profession, equipment have evolved from simple mechanical to electro-mechanical to logic-driven electro-mechanical and currently to computer driven machines. The medical equipment suppliers who employ mechanical engineers and/or mechanical engineers cannot cope with the repairs of the newer equipment. And many times end up changing whole modules and whole machines just because they cannot repair them. But I think HR is afraid to employ a mechatronics engineer just because they don't know what a mechatronics engineer does. Mechatronics is much more fun. It combines almost all of the engineering sciences and produces an all-rounded engineer. But until HR changes their mindset, not all door will be open.
    5 points
  17. 1973 Bulova Diamond Excellency Q. 11 AN mov't manual wind. Love the UFO look of this one. Not sure the size of the diamond but looking around for an advertisement to see if it is.listed....strap is not original but the buckle is signed along with the crown. In excellent condition.
    5 points
  18. My newest 404 candidate, a late '60's / early '70's Waltham with a UTC 33 / Seiko 6601 17 jewel automatic movement. It needed a new crystal and I put on a strap from my Strap Graveyard. The timegrapher was a snow storm before servicing but it cleaned up nicely. I really like the funky font used for the hour markers.
    5 points
  19. Here are the pics of the bridge. Looks correct, but as soon as I screw on the rotor, the watch stops. Video here: https://1drv.ms/v/s!ArG5E62RGctxjokY5ws85BzuJLVakA Pics. Might have figured it out. I have been working on this watch for a while and since I got it as a non runner in a terrible shape, there was no guarantee that parts were proper. I think the main screw that was used on the rotor was too long, so it was stopping the main train. As soon as I fished out a much shorter and larger headed screw, things were good again. Please celebrate with me.
    5 points
  20. Finally figured out why my hands are so god damn steady. My mum 87 years old , 4 weeks after her stroke and has a macular hole in both eyes, she wiped the floor with me and my lad at a kids stacking chairs toy game. Here she in rehab placing the last chair into position, bloody ' Supergreatgreatgran' i hope I'm half as fit at her age
    5 points
  21. I think the case turned out pretty nice in the end. Just thought I'd share a photograph:
    5 points
  22. Hi All, I'm Geoff and I've been working on/with watches and clocks since I was thirteen. My dad was a watchmaker and while he did not want me in the field as a profession, I've always maintained a pretty good working knowledge. In the '70's I kinda got pulled back into things because Quartz revolution began and he only had limited electronic knowledge. So we combined skills. He the watchmaker and me the electronics tech. Being here in NY helped because we got to know the folks from Bulova, Seiko, Citizen, and WOSIC. H.B. Freid was my Dad's teacher and I was fortunate enough to get to know him too. I still maintain a bench here at home and occasionally work on watches for friends although the hands aren't what they used to be. Not going to be working on any FHF59 or AS1012's any time soon. Oddly enough though my years working with the field taught me how to work on almost anything else mechanical and mostly electronic. Since I was the one in the family who maintained Dad's cleaning and timing machines. those experiences carried over quite nicely into the worlds of recording and audio as well as others. I look forward to the discussions and maybe still learning a trick or two. Cheers to all and nice to be here.
    4 points
  23. Do you use them? I have several pairs but never used them for watch repair work. The problem is the spring tension is already too high and may cause a "ping" when you release to grip the object. A conventional tweezer gives better tactile feedback. I use the fine grindstone on my bench grinder, then polish with a nylon fibre wheel to get a satin finish. I grind off about an 1 inch zone to distribute the stress to prevent metal fatigue from the repeated flexing. Take a close look at our College tweezers. Most of them have a thinner section just after the joint to give them flex.
    4 points
  24. I picked up this alarm watch at a flea market several months ago and recently decided to investigate. I am not finished, but well on my way. As you can see, there was significant water damage. Running these parts through my L&R cleaner was not enough to clean them, so I did manual cleaning with one-dip and cotton swab (the dense pointed kind). The wig-wag was stubborn--the two gears would not release from the plate. I soaked it in Kroil overnight and that did the trick. There was some rust on the balance staff, but not actually on the pivots themselves. Nevertheless, I chucked it a step-chuck on my lathe and burnished the pivots. The watch is running and I have confirmed that the alarm drive train is functioning. Since I am missing a stem for the alarm, I have not done the final assemble of the alarm components. Surprisingly, there are lots of parts available for this movement on Cousins. I will probably get a couple of stems and maybe some other parts that I deem necessary. The watch is running at weak amplitude (about 190) and shows some poising issues. I will work on that. The last two pictures are after partial reassembly.
    4 points
  25. Morning OH, absolutely not, that has never been the intention, there does seem to be a lot of emphasis placed on that point. Its only a contact storage location. Honestly OH , i cant get my head around why anyone wants to think why members would be pulled away from a forum that works so well. Your fear of losing the forum OH is exactly the same as everyone else's. Hopefully it will wont happen for a very long time, but not having a back up would mean that everything would be lost if it ever came to that. Scott has set that up for anyone that wants a failsafe, if they are not comfortable with it then of course they dont need to participate. Its entirely of their free will.
    4 points
  26. Problem solved. For some bizarre reason, the hook on the wall of this barrel is not properly centered vertically, but is oddly high on the wall, maybe 3/4 up the way up. When replacing the mainspring, this caused the outer coil to be displaced upwards as well such that it protrudes out of the barrel and caused the barrel lid to not sit quite flush to the barrel. Since this is a motor barrel, the lid is actually the first wheel and inner coil tube/hook all in one piece, with no “snap down” action that would have made the problem more immediately obvious. Maybe with an older mainspring the spring’s end hole was enlarged such that this wasn’t an issue, but hard to say how it ever worked otherwise. Replacing the barrel with one from a different model 1900 where the hook was properly vertically centered allowed the lid to sit flush without mainspring interference and the friction problem went away. The bridge was far too thick to be bent (and isn’t), for those of you thinking that was the problem. Placing the removable arbor in the watch without the rest of the barrel proved that the proper end shake was actually there as long as the overall height of the assembled barrel was correct.
    4 points
  27. I think my missus is mad ironing clothes, but what do i know ?
    4 points
  28. Just come back form a 2 week holiday. Bride had a wonderful time. Day two. Full blown tooth ache which had been on/off for two flaming month. Ever tried to concentrate on making repairs when a tooth ache is attacking? Sorted today. Call me gummy! So glad to read Mark's posting, and to note the comments. The members who are active may be few, but we do have, and give access to a large community out there. Mark reigns. Some of the greatest names we see on the web give homage. Individuals and companies acknowledge Mark. So pleased to be part of the learning circle of WRT.
    4 points
  29. Hi Neverenoughwatches, Yep from what I have seen now I'd say you were probably right, the veneer really doesn't like damp. I got lucky with the new bubble - it split the veneer, so I injected some glue and clamped it overnight. See pic for results. Not perfect but I think this is as good as I am going to get it.
    4 points
  30. I've been programming, building electronics for, repairing and retrofitting machine tools and industrial automation systems for over 40 years now. I could have retired, but I always have work queued up - and I still enjoy it; also building electronics, robots and animatronics (among other things) as hobbies. There is a vast range of work in machine tool / robotics / industrial automation field, and not all that many really good people, who fully understand the electronics and software side, rather than having been forced in to it from the mechanical side & struggling with anything to do with electronics or software. I can't help with the qualifications side - things have changed too much over the years, & I started my business before I left school. At the time I was getting criticised and even penalised by teachers for spending too much time on the school "computer" (a massive early programmable calculator, really) because computers & programming were a waste of time, according to them! One big problem I am aware of is that a lot of university courses have little to no correlation to real-world industrial machines and equipment - most of the equipment in the field that needs work is old! You have to be an enthusiast and study older system and techniques; it's no good knowing the state of the art electronics & software inside out when you are more likely to be working on a 50 year old machine than a brand new one. The oldest machine I routinely work on was made in 1911; many are from the 1950s - 80s. New machines tend to be under warranties or service contracts, so only the makers agents ever touch them - it's the older gear that gets sold on after it's showing its age and really needs actual engineers!
    4 points
  31. I have to add my thanks to @Mark for all he does here and his other site. It was Marks YouTube channel which got me into the track of the possibilities of repairing my own watches and servicing them. If I can help out at all as a moderator I volunteer wholeheartedly. Tom
    4 points
  32. Well Gentlemen and Ladies I think we should thank @Mark for his posts putting our minds to rest and the explanation of running the site which is done very well. As a resource for watch repairs for new and old I would rate it second to none, the casual banter and dissemination of information top notch, let us ll enjoy working on here and helping others. Any one can PM me as Iam sure others as well if it has to off the “record” and Marks blessing on that. We appreciate that Mark is a busy man and totally appreciate what he does for us all. So from me THANK YOU MARK. from an old timer.
    4 points
  33. As long as it’s legal and not spamming, information shared in private messaging between two consenting members is no concern of mine matey this isn’t eBay
    4 points
  34. Yes exactly scott, i managed to make it run perfectly true and then reintroduced some calculated wobble using a special formula that i created myself .
    4 points
  35. Hi, guys I got there in the end after several attempts using a screwdriver and Rodico, I couldn't wait for the tool to arrive and was getting pretty confident handling the stud screw without it flying away. At first, I was using far too much Rodico, and then realized you only need the smallest amount inside the screw slot. Putting the cock back onto the movement also helped as it gave me more to hold onto while my shaky hand tried to align the screw wobbling away at the end of the screwdriver Anyway, job done and I can move on. Thanks again for all the advice it's really appreciated for a beginner.
    4 points
  36. I feel like I've achieved the next level up . First watch with homemade part installed ( setting lever ). FHF 73, not bad to work on, simple and sturdy, and part working perfectly. An Avia and in time for this year's Olympics. It has a teenage dial ( bit spotty )
    4 points
  37. Moved in. Now working out the best place to have things so moving around the room makes sense. The wooden movement testing rig may end up being suspended from the roof with some pulleys and ropes that I salvaged from some alfresco blinds that we replaced. I always seem to salvage things from things we scrap thinking, "I have an idea what I can use these for." I hope I'm not the only one that does that. My wife hates me for it. "What are you going to do with all this crap?" Anyway, here you go. If anyone has suggestions for workflow around a room, speak up. All Ideas are appreciated. The bench on wheels will carry either a laptop or my Samsung table for using with the little camera that is on the tripod for photos while dismantling etc. The small bar fridge in the corners going to have water etc in it and I might move the coffee maker from the kitchen out there as I am the only one that uses it. I want to get an ultrasonic cleaner so I may set up some sort of cleaning rig in front of the glass of the sliding door. Where the grandmother clock is currently standing. I'm hoping that I will be able to transition my working area, which is the table that the stool is sitting in front of, fairly easily between clocks and watches. I'll be doing my best to make sure that tools for each are separatedwhen stored. Logistics. I'll have a bit of wall space for being able to hang clocks if I find some that I wish to keep or hopefully at some time to be able to hang customer clocks for monitoring after servicing/repairs. The clock on the left in the blue pillow slip and the grandmother clock are earmarked for Jarryd and his wife, Sara. He helped me move the benches in today. And then went on to tell me that ticking clocks drive him nuts. Who doesn't like the rhythmic ticking of a clock? I have a green pad for adding to the bench for a working surface. It is not a cutting mat or one of the Bergeon mats. It is actually a green desk writing mat. Was really cheap and will do exactly what I want, I think. I also have to get the sparkies back that put our new stove in to put some power points on the walls behind the benches. Hopefully this is all going to go well. I'm excited about it. It'll beat having to live out in the garage doing it. The other thing I have to do is cut a circle or square of plastic to go over the bouncing watch or clock part black hole in the middle of the floor. I would pretty much guarantee that anything that sproings off the bench would end up going straight down that drain. I think I have been on this forum about 4 years and still yet to really strike a blow. That's a bit sad isn't it. Signed up to Mark's watch course and have yet to buy the movement for working on. Have most of the tools I think I will need so now all just a matter of will. I have to make a crank handle for my Joe Collins spring winder as well and some spring retaining tubes as I can't find where I can buy them. I will be salvaging (here I go again) the aluminium tubing from my old hang glider which I have to scrap as I can't fly anymore and it is too old to sell. All the aluminium tubing is aircraft grade so I am hoping it will be suitable for the winder. I have also been making a bushing tool and I have just worked out that it will work well with my Dremel stand. So another thing that I can turn into a working tool. Don't know if you guys have ever seen the ad about the guy that buys himself a new 4WD and the son says "We're going to need a bigger boat." So Liz is looking at all the stuff we have to get rid of and says "We're going to need a bigger bin." Really difficult to work out how big a Dempster bin we need. Sigh.
    4 points
  38. The final result is not perfect looking, but is working well. The wheel is pritty small - the OD is 1.8mm
    4 points
  39. Better than the last one , removing the guesswork by taking spring positions made that possible
    4 points
  40. [SBGA405] Grand Seiko “Godzilla” Spring DriveI always enjoy coming back at the end of the week to my first Spring Drive watch which is a combined automatic mechanical watch and a high quality quartz — a Spring Drive.Impressive accuracy (10 seconds per month) and wears remarkably comfortable at 44.5 mm in diameter and 95 gm.Love the power reserve indicator, and the colour of the dial amd the watch band.One of my “perfect” watches!!
    4 points
  41. So I grew a pair today and installed the balance complete. And it's ticking. I made a 5 seconds clip, but I don't know how to upload it. I'll put some strap and wear it today to see how it works. Have a great day!
    4 points
  42. For those of you who are looking for a Seitz jewel gauge, I just want to make you aware that there may be a good opportunity right now at Tradera.com (Swedish eBay). The site has significantly fewer visitors than eBay and I have made several fantastic deals there. 1500 SEK corresponds to approx. £110/€128/$137 https://www.tradera.com/item/1922/631487681/seitz-urmakarverktyg-matare Just to make sure, I'm not associated with this listing in any way!
    4 points
  43. I think we all get a lot out of this group, and it has been pivotal in my development by the sharing of knowledge, experience and learning from more seasoned experts such as @JohnR725 and others (you know who you are!) as well as fellow novices. I think that having a backup communication plan in reserve so that if there is a future problem just makes good sense. I don't think anyone is trying to undermine the forum, but if something unthinkable happens, like the Ranfft website for example, then it would be good if those who are willing can still keep in contact. Speaking personally, and I know I risk a charge of heresy, it would be good if Mark could be a little more visible in this forum, and maybe give any insight from time to time on the future/progress of forum and instructional videos etc. even if its just to confirm the status quo. I appreciate he is a busy man with a full time job, but so are most of the rest of us and to post a few lines every now and then shouldn't be too much to ask to reassure the restless villagers. Best outcome for me would be a message saying something along the lines of: "Hi guys, all good, no planned changes... enjoy the forum, will message again next month!" Just my two cents.
    4 points
  44. Knocked out another 404 last night...when you are in the zone! This watch was a non-runner which I picked up as part of a lot of 8 watches, so works out to be $3.12 per watch. Before: And the finished watch, new crown and stem and the crystal was cracked so was replaced. I also replaced the mainspring as the original was the old steel type spiral and very 'set' - all else is original: The Movement was a AS 1686, but in reading around a little the ACCRO watch company were sued for their use of the five point crown on their Jacques Pere range as it resembled Rolex, see below: ACCRO then reverted to just ACCRO on their watches - I have done some sniffing around the internet and haven't seen another example of ACCRO and the crown together on a dial so maybe I have something unusual, or maybe I was looking in the wrong places .
    4 points
  45. No matter what I did, I could not get the amplitude more than 240 deg. At least there is 0.2 beat error and minus 1-2 s/d. So, probably not the happy end I would have hoped for, but still I think the watch turned out quite nice. You be the judge of that. Thank you everyone for your help!
    4 points
  46. According to these guys "Coating watch parts with a thin, even monolayer of epilame provides an effective oleophobic barrier that halts oil spread in its tracks." Which is exactly the same process that causes water beading on a waxed car. An oleophilic treatment would actually cause the oil to spread out to as thin a layer as possible as every oil molecule would try and come into contact with the oleophilic surface. The reason an oleophobic surface prevents spreading is because the oil behaves in such a way as to have as little contact with the treated surface as possible.
    4 points
  47. Picking up this side-tracked post again as I just removed a balance staff of a 1920's Omega (35,5L-T1) I was impressed by the way @Delgetti had his setup when he had to change out a balance-staff (https://www.watchrepairtalk.com/topic/28854-new-balance-staff-not-riveting-to-balance/page/2/#comment-244054 Not only that, but also the idea of removing the seat first before punching the staff out from the seat-side, avoiding the whole discussion of the rivet yes/no enlarging the hole. I didn't have the fancy clamps & tools Delgetti has, so I used my screw-head polishing tool. Initially I used #1500 grit diamond paste on the steel wheel, which kinda worked, but very slow. I changed to #800 grit diamond paste, which worked better, but still slow. Then I glued #240 sanding paper to the steel disk; That worked and the disk was hand-driven. Once close to the balance wheel, I took the sanding paper off and continued with #800 diamond paste. One can only do this when the balance wheel sits true on the staff and has no "wobble". I went on grinding until I saw some diamond paste on the rim of the balance wheel. This was as far as I could grind and it seemed that at that point there wasn't much left of the seat. Carefully, with my staking set, I knocked the staff from the seat-side out. Turns out that the thickness of the seat left, now a small ring, was only 0.1mm. The balance wheel hole is in perfect shape and no damage done to the wheel at all. Of course, if the wheel has a "wobble" or isn't seated true on the balance staff, you can't get as close and there will be more left of the seat. In my case, it worked perfect I'm very happy how this method worked out !
    4 points
  48. They showed up! It's a perfect fit. Can't wait to populate it and try it out.
    4 points
  49. Lubed up, back together (minus the one screw), and I'd say not a bad result! Going to give it a day or two to run in while I clean up the case and regulate it again, but off to a good start.
    4 points
  50. I missed this earlier. The dial isn't going into the holder, it should sit proud of it. This is what I am currently using which I print for each different movement.
    4 points
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