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  1. It is my impression that ETA's calibre 2892-A2 is usually found in more expensive watches and in luxury watches where oftentimes the movement has been modified. Mechanically, I don't think the 2892-A2 is superior to ETA’s classic 2824-2. Both movements have the same diameter (11 ½´´´ Ø 25.60 mm), the same frequency (28’800 A/h), and the same date complication. The decisive difference is the thickness where the 2892-A2 is one-millimetre thinner (3.6mm). That, combined with being a reliable and well-functioning movement, has made it popular for additional complications and alterations such as moon phase, power reserve display, co-axial escapement, chronograph modules from Dubois Depraz, and so on. The Swiss Sellita Calibre SW300-1 is, as far as I understand, an excellent clone of the 2892-A2. There is also a Chinese clone, the Seagull Calibre ST1812 (reviewed by @Markin the video “Chinese eta 2892-A2 Clone - Service and Review - Seagull ST1812”), and possibly others. Mark has made a playlist of videos that excellently demonstrate how to service the ETA 2892-A2 movement. The playlist is named: "Omega 2500 Co-Axial Stripdown and Service (ETA 2892-A2)" I recommend Mark’s playlist for several reasons. Among other things, he shows how to mount the barrel bridge safely and how to hold the minute train bridge with your tweezers to easily get it into place on the main plate (which I found a bit fiddly). In addition, he shows and compares the parts that are all too easy to mix up. One thing that is not shown in Mark's service video is that the Incabloc setting (chaton and cap jewel) for the balance and the main plate have different diameters. The main plate Incabloc setting diameter is smaller than that of the balance. The reason this is not shown in the video is probably that Mark removes, cleans, and lubricates the Incabloc settings one at a time after he reassembles the balance, so he wouldn’t notice. Anyway, don't mix up the two sets! Something that I appreciate about Mark's videos in general and that sets him apart from basically all other watch repairers on YouTube is that he doesn't continuously babble in his videos but mainly talks to make clarifications. I enjoy those segments of silence where I can just focus on the work being done. When I started my service, I decided to follow Mark's disassembly which worked perfectly. But for the assembly, I made up my mind to follow ETA's technical documentation to the letter. It turned out to be a mistake. In ETA's documentation, the assembly of the movement begins with the keyless works, then the train of wheels and then the barrel bridge. The crucial problem with this arrangement is that it is physically impossible to mount the barrel bridge if the train of wheels is already mounted. It is also very fiddly and difficult to baste the end of the winding stem into the winding pinion hole because the hole for the winding stem in the main plate is both open and tapered and therefore does not hold the winding stem. Mark takes a considerably more hands-on approach. He begins the assembly with the barrel bridge. He then mounts the keyless works whose constituent parts (the winding stem, the winding pinion, and the sliding pinion) are supported by the underside of the barrel bridge, making it considerably easier to get the keyless works in place. After I revised my strategy, this service walkthrough now follows Mark’s approach. It surprises me, but it seems like no watchmaker has proofread ETA's technical documentation. Alternatively, ETA follows an established practice and expects those using the documentation to understand that the assembly order in the document is not significant. I am also somewhat sceptical of ETA's recommendations regarding lubrication. Where we traditionally use grease, for example in the keyless works, ETA chooses mainly oil (HP-1300). I guess that ETA treats all parts of the movement with epilame (Fixodrop) and that oil may then be a better alternative. For better or for worse, my service walkthrough follows ETA's lubrication recommendations. As usual, I would like to remind those of you with no previous experience in watch servicing that this service walkthrough should not be seen as a tutorial on how to service a watch movement. A lot of tools, consumables, training and know-how are required to succeed. Fortunately, there are several excellent resources and watchmaking schools online. When looking through the pictures you’ll see that a few screws and plates are either marred or have pits and grooves in them. None of this is my doing but is either the result of rust (that I removed) or the doings of a less scrupulous repairer than myself. Finally, someone may ask, “Why to bother to do a service walkthrough with pictures when there is such an excellent video?" The main answer to the question is that I find it interesting and fun, and I see it as a complement to Mark's service video. Using this walkthrough, you can quickly scroll through the pictures to read what the different parts are called and where and in what order they should go, what the screws to be used look like, and to read ETA's lubrication recommendations. So, I hope you’ll find this ETA 2892-A2 service walkthrough useful, now or in the future. *** ETA Calibre 2892-A2 Disassembly *** ' *** ETA Calibre 2892-A2 Assembly ***
    11 points
  2. It's been a helluva journey of learning and frustration but my first watch is done. Scratched the dial on my first day of learning but that's ok. I bought this...rather ugly and cheap watch as the sacrificial lamb for this but I'm definitely gonna cherish it forever as the first watch i ever worked on. Very pleased with how it came out. I even treated her to a sapphire crystal. Thanks for all the help everybody. I super appreciate everybody who helped me out. Gonna do a service on my Orange Monster next then onto my first true project watch.
    7 points
  3. I totally agree with you, and really appreciate the support. Thanks Nickelsilver. I do understand the economics involved, although as a consumer it can be hard to swallow. Ive had a couple of businesses and really do understand just how expensive they are to keep going, and how the cost is passed onto the customer. When I had the car workshop which I consider to be a very small business, it cost me many thousands each week just to open the doors. Customers sometimes struggled to understand why an hourly rate could possibly be so high, but it was very carefully calculated so we could keep the doors open. What I don't like is the disingenuous nature of some of these brands. Trying to tell you, you are getting something special when you aren't. The aforementioned brand made a big deal of their special stamped brass dials! it felt like they were taking advantage of their chosen market. I really can't stand that. Wow. Im not sure what to say! Thank you Claypipe. Im not sure I can take the credit for this. This is a very special forum that brings out the best in people from my point of view. But I am very pleased you like the watches, and would love to see your work. Welcome to the forum. Today is my 45th birthday and I’m very happy to have completed the watch I will be wearing for the rest of the year. I’ve finally got the brushing on the chapter ring exactly where I want it, the bleached silver just the right shade of white, and an even blue on the hands. Definitely making progress.
    7 points
  4. Finally found a time window to sort out the low amplitude issue on my lovely non-Mumbia Favre Leuba. The only job left to sort was the replacement of the twin mainsprings - pure cowardice. I'm delighted to say it has transformed to amplitude from 215 to 275 degrees so worth doing but not a beginners job. Here's what was learnt from the struggle which should help fellow watch menders. Forget about getting the exact spring from Favre - the new company is another resurrected imitation. According to Dr Ranfft you are looking for 1.55 x 6.5 x 0.065 x 210. Another site suggests a 270 mm length. The old springs were tired but 270 mm long so looking at the fill in the 6.77 mm internal barrel diameter using the longer length looked the way to go. The nearest Cousins UK had in stock was GR4052 which is 7.5 mm diameter so they will need to be unwound and rewound into a 6.5 mm winder barrel. At over £20 each inc VaT this was expensive - Gleaves & Sons had 1.5 x 0.7 x 285 x 7 mm dia for £6 each so they got the order. It still meant rewinding so make sure you have the small winding tools this requires. The barrel design is probably unique. To save height there is no barrel top - instead the winding wheel sits on top of the open barrel and covers the spring. It has a hollow stem which forms the arbor and has the spring hook on this sleeve. The barrel has a hollow stem and one fits over the other - very neat. It's a pig to get apart. Use your sprung hand puller hooked under the geared cover as shown in the pictures. Next problem is that the new spring will have the inner circle in too large a diameter so that the arbor hook will not engage with the attachment slot. I tried a few tricks but the one that worked was to go ahead and install the spring in the open barrel. Then using flat ended strong tweezers squeeze the spring end to tighten that last curve until the wheel/arbor grabs. Patience and trial and error will be required.... It can be done before inserting the spring but make sure you put a drill through the middle to squeeze against thus preventing the brittle metal from snapping. 1.2 mm proved to be the best size. However I would suggest you do it after the spring is in the barrel since it makes it easier to thread in your winding tools. The hollow spigot in the barrel works as a handy former to shape the spring against. Don't forget to put a drop of HP 1300 or something similar on the outside and inside of the barrel spigot. Note that the spring should be CLOCKWISE in the barrel - ie starting from the centre it curves clockwise. Helpfully the neat design means that both barrels run the same way so are identical. Also admire the large ruby bush pivots on the barrel bridge - a feature that very few factory produced watches offered in this era - and still don't. Also look how well the balance is supported. Be careful when screwing down the bridge - the small winding wheel has to be guided into the barrel cover gear. This is a delightful slim movement and a great shame that so many ended up in tropical climates. She now runs like a champ 275 degrees amplitude DU and a two position delta of 6 seconds.
    6 points
  5. Recently there were several rants about the dreaded 3 pronged Russian shock spring. I have done quite a number of Russian movements but never had much problem with the shock springs until a couple of days ago. This Slava 2427 had the most uncooperative shock springs that I have ever come across. Just cleaning and oiling the two balance jewels took me almost an hour. I think it was a combination of a stiff shock spring and badly polished shock spring seats. I could get 2 prongs in but after that, the friction was so great that it became impossible to turn the last prong after it was pressed into the notch. It was then that I decided to make a tool to fit the shock spring in. My mentor described how to make this tool to me several years but I never made one as I never had much problems with shock springs before. It is rather simple. The tube was taken from an old spring bar and expanded slightly to fit the hole in the shock spring seat. Three shallow notches were made in the rim of the tube to catch the 3 prongs of the shock spring. The notches must be shallow, so that the tube can depress the prongs. It only took me 15 minutes to make the tool and using it to fit the shock spring is a real godsend. If any of our members have problems refitting these 3 pronged springs, I strongly advise making this tool.
    6 points
  6. I FIGURED IT OUT! So for archival purposes this is what was goin on. The reason the movement was stopping is because the escapement lockup was failing. The reason the lockup was failing is because there was too much endshake in the escape wheel. The reason there was too much endshake in the escape wheel is because this is one of those weird 7s36 movements with the two extra useless jewels. In the service manual AND the only tutorial on the internet of a service of specifically a 7s36b, it tells you to put on this plate with the two useless jewels in this pic, 3rd wheel and pinion plate after you put in the pallet fork and balance etc. This is fine and i'm not sure why the movement works for the guy doing the tutorial before putting that plate on but putting this plate in drastically cuts down on the endshake of the escapement wheel and everything appears to be working as normal only after it's on. Before it was on the pallet fork would sometimes be on top of the escapewheel which would cause those tooth skips. Very pleased i can move forward again.
    6 points
  7. My collection of electronic watches has grown this past year. Here is what I have that has been given new life so far! Most are ESA 9154 movements that were used in makers such as Elgin, Waltham, Caravelle, Benrus just to name a few.
    6 points
  8. Looks like a nice tool. The three shafts are the runners, the short one is specially made for working on long 4th wheel pivots. The slotted ends are the beds, and the markings on the beds should correspond to pivot sizes; as I understand it there were some tools made where the numbers are arbitrary, but generally not. Depending on the tool the number might be the actual pivot size you will make when the burnisher stops contacting the pivot, or it might make the pivot slightly smaller to fit a jewel of the marked size. These are intended for use with steel or carbide burnishers. Neither will appreciably wear the tool beds even with frequent use- but- often in the past they may have been used with stones or other abrasive tools (like sapphire tools). You should be able to discern grinding marks on the beds that are "factory", in which case you can pretty much rest assured the tool wasn't abused. Using abrasives on this tool is a big no-no. The discs are called lanterns, and are used when working on the pivot ends. A chip here or there isn't the end of the world, as you just need a hole that will pass the pivot through enough to access it with the burnisher. Yours should be fine. These tools were made as matched sets, and will almost always have a number on the frame and then numbers on the runners that correspond. In some cases the runners might just have the last digit or last two from the frame number. You will need a burnisher and a means to drive the pulley, I highly recommend the Bergeon carbide burnisher model 2933G. G is for gauche, or left in French, but it is actually for right hand use on a Jacot tool. They aren't cheap, so if you look for a secondhand one beware that some older ones have a rather large radius for conical pivots and might only be useful for large pocket watch staffs. The current ones (and ones made in the last 20-30 years for sure) have a 0.2mm radius which is small enough for even tiny staffs and still works well on larger pivots. To drive it, traditionally you would use a bow. I use a bow, with light fishing line. Another fine way to drive it is with a piece of elastic, with fishing line attached, and a ring at the end of that. Attach the elastic back on the bench behind the tool (which will be in a vice), wrap the line around the pulley, and pull on the ring to drive it.
    6 points
  9. Hello again to all at the forum. It has been almost 12 months since I started. Never having looked at a watch apart from telling the time on my wrist. Where am I? Well, I now consider myself a fully fledge watch hobbyist. I now partially emulate many of those illustrious YouTube personalities who restore watches. I can remove a movement form a case, disassemble a movement. Clean the components using peg wood and liquid, lighter fluid and IPA. I can even remove and clean jewels. Clean and replace mainsprings. Not yet able to repair balance hairsprings, But I am working on it. Microscope for Christmas from my bride. Can't wait for the 25th. All this I can do without leaving a scratch on the surface. Hardly a 'ping' in evidence either. Case repair. Unfortunately, not for me. Just a general clean using and ultrasonic machine. I've limited myself to a few movements. ETA 2789 and 2789-1. Seiko, 6309, 6319, 7009 and 7S26. Citizen Miyota 8200a and my favourite Sekonda 2428 and 2427. All of which I can disassemble and assemble with ease. Happy Bunny. I still have year to go before I attempt my own lifetime watch. A Breitling Top Time, with a Valjoux 7730. A special thank you to all you members who have encourage me during this time in our world's dark history. I have learned from you all. Perserverance and practice. YouTube has been a great help. Initially it was hard, not really understanding much. Mark's course was a great. Learned so much and still learning. Other's now help as much as I can assimilate to a higher degree. My bride has just called to coffee. So, tools way. Regards Ross
    5 points
  10. Mine even has Blue in the name !
    5 points
  11. I have said this somewhere else on this forum: working on radium is simply not a concern IMHO. I posted several government papers on the topic that support my view and I gave the anecdotal evidence that my father worked on radium watches from 1947 to about 1990 without taking any precautions that I am aware of. He died at 93 of issues unrelated to radium All that being said, don't eat it or ingest it through other body orifices. I have one of the inexpensive geiger counters...just for fun.
    5 points
  12. No that's definitely a bad attitude. Especially with American pocket watches the banking pins are movable and you should definitely move them leave them in some random place because you can what would be the consequences? Just to be technically correct that's not exactly a wostep handout. If you look carefully at the title which I think I changed after I downloaded it it's a combination of wostep and North Seattle community college As that's Where I down off their website. Which is why it's kind of a mixed up mess of things. But still it's good even if it is kind of a mess Then there's the problem with escapement terminology and time and wherever you're located or and a combination of all of us. If you look at various handouts on the escapement and I'll add in a couple more for you they have differing terminologies and they'll get obsessed with certain terminologies and stuff. The terminology becomes kinda Of amusing like so many things in watch repair there can be actually multiple names for the same part just depending upon where and when. But as you like handouts let's attach a few more. I usually think of the banking pins is there for Horn clearance only. But other people think of them as solutions to potential problems that they perceive they have or have not. Which is why typically on American pocket watches with movable banking pins they been moved. Then related to these so-called wostep handout is this lecture. Yes a perfect example of what happens when you film a lecture given at AWCI convention the audio sucks. But it's an extremely good lecture he's a very good teacher is well worth your time and effort to try to make it through it. Elgin watch company Escapement Terminology.PDF Escapement Detached Lever Escapement.PDF Escapement Elgin setting up the escapement.PDF
    5 points
  13. Here's a copy of a Wostep handout regarding the escapement. It doesn't use the exact same terminology as @nickelsilver's steps, but I believe it covers the same territory. Escapement handout wostep nscc.pdf
    5 points
  14. I think I’m about done. In the end, I removed two regular balance screws and added two much smaller screws that I found in my “Junque”. Mean time screws remain on the balance. Dial down is 0 s/d and dial up is +7 s/d. The amplitude is impressive for an old pocket watch. Side positions are similar, with amplitude staying above 260. I would like to get the beat error down to <0.5 but think I’ll leave it it for now. Thank you all, again!
    5 points
  15. @JohnR725and @grsnovi: good points too ! My plan was give the donor movement a proper service and see what it does. If I decide to swap parts, it will initially only be the balance assembly (balance wheel & hairspring). If my GGF's watch runs happy on that, that's already one option. However, if one gets to the point were the pallet fork, and most likely the escapewheel also needs to be changed, and perhaps when that combination isn't happy even more, yes then it become perhaps a "necessity" to swap the whole movement. For sure, I'll keep track as to which part belongs to which movement. I ordered a box full of junk-parts. Among those parts are quite a few balance-wheels and I do hope to find some more appropriate timing-screws. The original balance wheel had two timing screws missing. Without these two, the movement runs +600 / +700 sec/day with the regulator at full "slow". When I install two of my (too heavy) timing-screws in either slot, the movement runs -600 / -700 sec/day with the regulator at full "fast". If I install only one of those too heavy timing screw, the movement runs DD, with the regulator in the middle (the lift-angle empirical established and for now ignoring the beat-error); What I need to find are two timing screws, combined weight slightly heavier than one of my current timing screws (I don't have under-cutters etc). Then comes the poising part. As for the arbitrate, but best guess, vibration point, perhaps we have to live with that "as-is". So I haven't given up yet on the old balance assembly. It does need more work and as @dadisticsays, a project which requires time. Next to that, the mainspring barrel has wear, so has the center wheel, causing both to be slightly tilted. I'm hoping that by reducing all the relevant hole sizes to straighten those two and that the amplitude will increase..... Regardless, the good news is that most likely I'll get a running watch, be it with the original movement, the donor-movement or a combination thereof Yes it is! There was a late family member who made sure that not all was lost, and there is even one more picture of my GGF. Standing proudly on (clearly) his steam locomotive, wearing perhaps the pocket-watch (you can see the chain) which is now in my possession ..... sadly the watch I received didn't come with a chain, but I guess, if the watch stopped working, these chains were either used for something else or sold. I do assume that my GGF knew these living & breathing machines, knew all sounds and the locomotives quirks. These drivers were thoroughly skilled people and therefor, to restore his watch, I like to pull all my skills (known and yet to be learned) out of the cupboard......
    5 points
  16. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ship_of_Theseus I have faced this dilemma and it is tough. GGF rarely saw the movement, but always saw the case, dial, and hands. I think I would swap the movement and continue to work on the original.
    5 points
  17. and now a new one to the collection an all stainless steel case with original bracelet. had crack in crystal and crown had snapped off the stem. I replacement crown with a longer tube did the trick and I swapped the crystal from a non-runner. Need a little more cosmetic touch up but for now it is an awesome addition.
    5 points
  18. one of the problems with this discussion is there are too many variables that will affect the outcome. Then we have all kinds of examples of things for instance Elgin, Hamilton and Rolex made balance staffs that are supposed to be driven out without a problem. before I continue one of the nice things about where I live is the remnant of a AWCI chapter. We once were AWCI but we split so over the years I've had really interesting lectures and knowledge gained. including from memory three separate lectures on replacing balance staffs of interest in this particular discussion. One of the lectures given by somebody who is Rolex trained. He brought the Rolex tools the jeweling tool and demonstrated and explained why Rolex pushes the staff out. I have some pictures down below that show this. So is explained that the roller table was removed with whatever method you like. note was extremely long time ago so I don't remember sort of how he removed the roller table. One method was to grab it with a lathe collet and just rotate the thing off but he might have used razor blades I just don't remember. then we all gathered around for the procedure. The interesting aspect was he asked everybody be super quiet because when the river broke it made a very distinctive sound. Then he picked up the rivet and put it on his hand and brought it around and show dusters is beautiful shiny ring of the rivet. Then I'm assuming he restaffed the watch I don't remember that aspect I was just finding how to remove the staff interesting and of course you need all the special tools that come in the fancy Rolex box that none of us is ever going to have. not a lecture given by the same person and somebody else was on modern vintage staff replacement. Both of them discussed knocking the staff out were driving it out by a minor clarification here. When you go to knock the staff out if there's any sort of resistance in other words it doesn't just instantly pop out were instantly want to come out then you will have to do some cutting. When I was in school the instructor George showed us how to use the k&d tool and his procedure was to weaken the rivet just a little bit and claim to never have a problem. Then the most recent lecture was based on another discussion somewhere in the universe that resembles this one the sins of driving the staff out basically. Don't remember the watch for his example was a wristwatch it to the wristwatch a whole bunch of balance staffs that he had for that particular watch and what he did for his lecture he and do it they are you get a PowerPoint buddy put the staff in the history of the staff out you put it in drove the staff out and I don't remember how many times he didfive or 10 just don't remember all the see if there was any damage at all the conclusion was there was none. then thinking of pushing the staff out I remembered once seen the article in a magazine. the magazine is a horological times published by AWCI rather than quoting I discuss snip out a tiny section for you. Oh and on the next page he has a reference to not thinking this is a good idea for a nickel balance wheel which I assume is the white colored metal ones. Kinda like in the video above for the person says this is what Rolex taught us except here somebody thinks nickel would be bad. In other words if you going to do this you need a hard balance wheel and is staffed it's hopefully going to break. oh and then in the lecture of worry restaffed the watch a whole bunch of times yes there were some people unhappy with that. There is also discussed if the balance wheel is not made out of steel another method would be to just dissolve the staff out. Another was dissolve at the same way out as you would a broken screw in a plate is just use alum as that would cause no problems at all. Then back to too many variables. All the methods are good and conceivably all the methods are bad. For any of us who been around for a while we've seen bad. people I got carried away cutting the rivet often cut the balance arms and also of course cutting the hub often cutting the balance arms. All the methods that rely on rivets breaking relies on a very hard staff what about a staff that's cut from softer metals? Or maybe things were a little bigger than they should abandon somebody really hammered down hard and mushroomed out the metal and know that is not going to drive out really nice and clean. so I just thought I'd add to the controversy of whatever it is you're doing that's controversy of removing staffs
    5 points
  19. Got this clock for free and found that the coil was open as the connecting wire had broken from the enameled wire. It is riveted together so I had to cut one of them to get it apart. Had to soak the coil assembly in water and IPA so that the paper would come off. Then I found the end of the coil that had broken. Unwound a few turns so that I had plenty to work with. Then I made a bobbin for the coil so that it set firmly in the case. 3D printed. Now to assemble, I had to drill out the rivet and tap some 440 threads. It is all assembled and working. However, I need to make a connector piece to mount some metal tabs so that there is no stress on the enameled wire. I have some ideas working in my head.
    5 points
  20. Modern high grade balances are generally a beryllium copper alloy that has been heat treated. While not as hard as hardened and tempered steel, it's far harder than many lower or common grade balance made of nickel alloy. I can imagine that Rolex designs and makes its staffs in a manner, that, after plenty of tests, they determined that pushing the staff out with a jeweling tool works well and doesn't impede an accurate replacement. I wouldn't try it with anything else (or a Rolex for that matter). Even if some of the rivet is cut away the staff is still enlarged there. Pushing it through the hole in the balance can only enlarge the hole. On one hand, since I make all the staffs I put into balances, I fit them to the hole, so it's not really an issue. On the other, if down the road the staff needs to be replaced again, the next watchmaker using a bought replacement staff might be looking at a sloppy fit. I have cut out (hub side) many staffs, only to find that the hole size in the balance is several hundredths over its supposed correct size. Was a staff knocked through sometime in its past? Who knows- and it's one (of many) reasons I just make rather than buy staffs. I know that many professional watchmakers have used one of the several tools for "safely" knocking out staffs for their whole career. Most watchmakers, it seems, haven't used a lathe since their school days. Doesn't mean they are wrong, but doesn't mean that it's the best way. As I recall, we were shown how to use the K&D tool in school, since we might be expected to use it later in employment; but we were told the best is to cut off the hub. When I was in school in the 90s the world of watch repair was just coming out of a dark period where speed and price reduction was the driving force. There was then and increasingly so since a push for quality, not speed. Since rarely a 24h period goes by without me using my lathe for something or other, it's a non-issue to just cut out the staff, so I do it that way. For those that don't have a lathe or confidence on the lathe, you can still dissolve away a staff in a saturated alum solution if working on a non-steel balance wheel. It does work well, and there is zero risk of damaging the hole.
    5 points
  21. I agree with @praezis that balance staff removal should only be attempted in a lathe. However, many/some other watchmakers who are also fairly well experienced are certain that punching out a balance staff while supporting the balance wheel is acceptable (at least if done only once), and will not distort the balance wheel hole. This debate over balance staff removal has continued for a very long time, and like choice of lubrication, is unlikely to ever end. People over at the NAWCC forum have even gone to the extent of measuring the size of the hole in the balance wheel AFTER the balance staff has been punched out. Proponents of removal punching out the balance staff have claimed that it is only improper punching out of the balance staff that distorts the hole. However, the flange of the rivet which secures the balance staff on the balance wheel still has to pass through the hole when the balance staff is punched out. While a single balance staff punched out once (done properly) should not distort the hole much, it’s much safer to remove the balance staff using a lathe. This is similar to the question of whether to use a reamer in a jeweling tool to enlarge a hole in the main plate: it’s far better to mount the main plate on a lathe and optically center the hole to be enlarged. This avoids hole drift, especially if the hole is in a part of the main plate of uneven thickness.
    5 points
  22. Yes we've had lengthy discussions were newbies feel unhappy which is why we actually have a safe zone for newbies to ask questions. But sometimes people won't even look at the newbies questions for fear of somehow upsetting a newbie. Supposedly at least the person who really wanted the newbie section was that newbies could work together share their ideas pool their resources and not have to deal with the evil experience people on the group. The problem is that the newbies don't have experience or knowledge to answer their own questions. Then unfortunately a lot of newbie questions can be answered with a section of standard answers. But apparently newbies don't want that they want to have an individual answer for the same question that's been asked 50 times in the last month although I don't think I've ever seen that here. A lot of times newbies get very demanding on how the watch world works and it's not actually grasp how it works to the settled Down and then start to behave appropriately for the discussion group. Yes contrary to popular belief learning watch repair is not easy and everybody gets frustrated. Bless everyone has parts issues I have watches currently on the bench or actually it's a small car clock needs parts no idea where were guy get them so it's going to sit there for a while. With angry customer calling from time to time wanting to know where the status of the clock is now there is something the hobbyists shouldn't have is angry customers bothering them. The problem with Seiko is is it an overseas Seiko or US Seiko? Then there's also the possibility that maybe the material houses don't work with Seiko.Then of course there is the other problem material houses are run by people just like us well hopefully knowledgeable people in the material business but not necessarily. Then they need numbers the same as we do so yes conceivably they're all using the same database which is what the problem is. So they don't have Seiko access their probably accessing the same thing we are online Then I would be curious would you give me the wrong numbers please and are we still waiting for correct number for your case? What hostile watchmakers? One of my friends Doug learning watch repair on his own I pointed out that we have a school yes Seattle has two schools we have a professional school and a school for hobbyists to learn watch repair in a friendly safe environment. I'll give you a link below and know don't even think of emailing and asking about online courses they don't do the. Not that people don't keep emailing and then I send them to Mark's course that is if I think they're serious and not pulling a scam because most of them are trying to scam in some way or another now back to Doug one day at a nawcc meeting He was explaining that is he was learning watch repair whatever he was looking at he went downtown and asked the question and I resisted laughing hysterically because I knew what the outcome would be. So what was his question he walked into the furnace watchmaker shop explained that he taught himself watch repair he offered them money if they would evaluate what he did and of course they all through them out. No that's not true of everybody if you walk into where I work and ask Sam's happy to sell you a practice movement and talk to you so it's not 100% but a lot of the old-time watchmakers are well very peculiar people. Amusingly that's something they try not to talk about at the school teaching professional watchmakers locally. Dave the instructor comments it basically well we can't compete with Microsoft. With so many tech companies like Microsoft that starting pay is $1 trillion an hour or whatever it is watch repair just can't compete. So yes the pay is a definite problem but let's look at this a little bit differently what you think it should cost to get a watch serviced? Let's look at the Seiko in this discussion is anyone know how long it would take the taken apart clean it lubricate it put it back together case it up add in handling the paperwork because you're doing a job for customer you have to some paperwork possibly some billing how much time you think is spent to service the watch? How much an hour would you like to make look at your current pay and if you're running a business you have to charge more because you can't just collect your pay you have to pay for all that equipment you have the cleaning machine the timing machine etc. Then unless you're working retail we typically get the most money if your wholesale well usually that's 50% but not always. So in other words if you took a watch into a jewelry store and it cost you $400 to get your watch serviced and you felt ripped off. The watchmaker only got $200 Of that. The worst-case example what is working downtown was think I can't quite remember they marked up the wholesale it wasn't the typical twice it might have been four times I think that's what it was and in the cost of the repair was the same price at the person paid for the watch brand-new from their buddy at the wholesale house which was selling Seiko watches. And you know whose fault that was that was the greedy **BLEEP** watchmaker who nearly lost her Seiko service account. Yes in the early days independent watchmakers basically ran service center is for the various companies were now they have their own independent shops You should have been at the Christmas party I was at last week a nawcc local chapter Christmas party that had the various president of marketing for a chain of local jewelry stores. Talked about all the watch brands they have the trends and then I got to the end where they talked about the problem. A huge problem that she perceived and they're going to give out more scholarships now to encourage people to get in the watch repair. Not that they're already not trying to read the try to set up some of their own teaching I think in association with the school. Basically they're running scared of the lack of watchmakers means the watch makers are going to cut back even more as a guess. So I think she had a fantasy thought and their thought was more people servicing then hopefully more parts perhaps but she didn't ask you say that. So they want to take an active role in making sure there are enough watchmakers because I'm pretty sure there service center makes a lot of money she was giving numbers and they service hell of a lot of Rolex watches and if they couldn't get Rolex spare parts that would be a huge impact to the business. Unfortunately I have to wonder if they talk to the Swiss about these plans because I think the Swiss one to illuminate everybody who repairs watches. I don't think they care whether a hobbyist or a professional. It's why Rolex has a service center in Texas filled with unskilled labor that just does one little task. Like one person will disassemble watch and it goes in the cleaning machine another person will reassemble another person will lubricate and only if it fails some quality control what go to something that resembles a real watchmaker. Quite a savings not to have to pay skilled people or distribute spare parts all over the place. Not sure this quite compares for instance if you go down to your local auto shop will they let you hang around in the shop? And yes I know you hate this example let's go to the hospital and hang around in the operating room to get a feel for becoming a doctor. A lot of the hobby and artist spaces are well-liked makers spaces they still exist out there yes they encourage people to come and visit but they're not a professional business trying to run and make money. It's kinda hard to do watch work and talk to newbies at the same time. Well it's hard to talk to anybody when you're doing watch work and then you get yelled at by Your boss For talking too damn much but I'm the skip over how I know about that one. Now I give you a quest reach out to all those people who want to know if you do watch work and ask them how much they would pay you to do the watch work? In the early days I remember the jewelry stores were damn cheap cheaper the better. So basically the only way wholesale watch shops can function is out of people's houses preferably in the middle of nowhere where rent costs nothing. Think about it this way you're a collector of watches you have hundreds of them occasionally need to be serviced and you spent so darn much money on those expensive watches you really want to pay somebody to service them? After all you get the oil changed in your car for how much shouldn't to watch repair costs something similar?. Oh and the case you think I'm joking about this is another discussion group out there of collectors who think that? Will it used to be they thought of pocket watch repair I think was between 50 and $100 and a while back somebody was recommended and I think he was like 125 for pocket watch repair and they said he was expensive. So yes watch collectors are really cheap and don't want to pay watchmakers. So it's a really complicated situation of it just complicated and there's going to be no easy solutions Or answers and the parts availability is never going to change. Especially if you understand how parts come into existence anyway and how their distributed. Yes hobby schools really exist but unfortunately you have to be within driving distance of Seattle. http://www.norwestschoolofhorology.com/ Oh and is not just hobby school we have an Association it once was in AWCI chapter but we got annoyed with them and broke free. So meetings that are open to anybody. If you have an interest in watches and clocks and repair and you're within driving distance. http://www.norwestschoolofhorology.com/wwca/index.html
    4 points
  23. Good day everyone So, after practicing reassembly on a non working Seiko 7S26A with a dial foot lodged in the centre wheel, including rewinding (and breaking) a kinked mainspring, losing diafix cap jewels, and reinstalling a balance complete, I obtained two working movements from speedtimerkollektion., both 7S26A. The first was advertised as "the movement runs and stops." Turns out the hands were bent downwards and the second hand was blocked by a dial index. Once that was popped off, the balance wheel swung back into life. I put it on my newly acquired timegrapher: Found the readings varied somewhat depending on gain setting. Compared it with the app WatchTuner so decided to settle on this reading. Decided to attempt my first ever service. The parts were in worse shape than the previous non working 7S26 with crud and rusted areas. Cleaned the parts with rodico, pegwood, and pithwood before ultrasonic cleaning in jars with Petroleum Ether, Propanol, and 2nd rinse Propanol (3 min each). Cleaned the pallet fork and balance by soaking in a jar of Hexane. My little 1L 55W cleaner struggles to remove all the gunk and rust. Placed a few parts in white vinegar for a few hours to remove the worst of the rust. Definitely have to work on my cleaning technique given what I'm seeing under the microscope. Some screws are still discoloured. Reassembled and oiled using 9010, 9104, 9415 and 9504. Used S-4 on the first reduction wheel and pawl lever. Used notched pegwood to reinstall the diafix springs and a balance taper pin to oil the assembled diafix setting from the other side. My Chinese automatic oiler arrived with a bent needle that promptly broke so I am awaiting a new needle. I left the mainspring barrel well alone since it was winding and unwinding normally (unlike the previous practice movement). So this is the result without any regulation (which I have yet to delve into). I've got the second working 7S26A to practice on then a complete Seiko 5 7S26A watch I picked up on Yahoo Japan auctions. Will work on these before any of my own 7S26 or 6R15 watches. So after the Chinese ST36 (6497 clone) (a true victim) and two 7S26As, I wanted to try my hand at hairspring manipulation, balance staff replacement, jewel adjustment etc. Turns out Seiko Ladies tiny form movements are not popular with collectors. I obtained two working 1104A watches on Yahoo Japan Auction (for just 639 yen each) and nine non working 1104A movements from speedtimerkollektion (for about 1.50 to 2.50 USD each). Got some NOS spare parts so have some good practice material to work with. This is the first one I've started to disassemble. About the size of an American dime and older than I am.
    4 points
  24. Hi - I recently serviced a JeanRichard JR1000. I was unable to find any technical documentation in the usual locations, so I had to wing it. In the end, there were no real surprises, except the reassembly of the power reserve mechanism was a but tricky. I invented my own procedure for this which I will explain later. This watch is a limited edition - #13 of 50 produced. On arrival the watch would not run for more than a few seconds. After removing the back, you can see here that the movement is secured with 4 case clips. The screws on the outer perimeter seem to secure the crystal/bezel to the case proper. That said, after removing them I was unable to separate the case. I decided to leave it be instead of risking damage. Once I removed the case screws and clips, the movement and its retainer were easily removed. Next step was to remove the hands in the normal fashion. Removing the 2 screws indicated by tweezers below freed the movement from the substantial retainer. This assembly really holds the movement VERY securely in place. Removing the dial is done in the normal fashion - 2 screws on the side of the movement (not shown). Once removed you can see the power reserve mechanism along with connecting lever that couples the mechanism with the power reserve indicator hand. I removed the plastic "track" that the indicator lever travels in by removing the 2 small screws and lifting up. Not pictured below, the lever is also easily removed from the plastic traveler. There is another component that the lever attaches to on the underside. Make sure you pay attention to the orientation of this component when removing - it is asymmetric. I failed to do this, but it's pretty simple to deduce the correct orientation on assembly. Also - remove the thin plastic (teflon?) sheet that I assume is a friction reducer. The rotor is removed by removing the 3 small retaining screws. Next up is the reversing wheel - part of the automatic mechanism. Remove the screw indicated below, slide the retaining clip out and then remove the wheel. Here's the underside of the reversing wheel. On reassembly on treated with Lubeta V105. Remove the balance and pallets - normal procedure - obviously after letting down the power in the mainspring! After removal, I put a slight wind on the mainspring, but no power was transmitted to the train - so clearly there is something very wrong here! That said, I don't see anything obvious in terms of broken teeth, loose parts, etc. Remove the train bridge and then remove the balance hack (pointed to by tweezers) There's a bit of disassembly to do on the reverse side of the train bridge. Start by removing the single blue screw and the small bridge that it secures. Remove the 2 small brass gears. And the remaining components. Note the dial washer that sits beneath one of the gears. Remove the escape wheel and the barrel bridge. The click and clickspring are on the reverse side of the barrel bridge. They should be removed (no pic) Remove the train gears and the center seconds pinion. And at this point I see the issue with the movement. The barrel is frozen in place. The lower bearing seems to have some material, like gunk, that has seized up and is restricting its movement. I had to use a bit of force to dislodge the barrel from the main plate. I didn't see any notable permanent damage - just a large deposit of dirt and grease. After wrestling the barrel from the main plate, remove the arbor and spring. Note the arbor has a small independently rotating section on it as well. You can see it as brass on in the pic below. So far so good - let's flip the movement over and focus on the dial side. This power reserve mechanism requires some exploration. I am using the tweezers below to point out the orientation that the mechanism is in when there is no power in the mainspring. Note that I actually took this pic before disassembling the other side of the watch - while the barrel and train were still in the watch. Remove the 2 small screws and the retaining plate. Lift the mechanism as a unit out of the watch. You need to wiggle it a bit to get it out. The reason for this will be apparent soon. The small gear remaining below actually fits between 2 of the gears in the mechanism removed above. The reverse of the reserve mechanism. Nothing to disassemble here - I just cleaned it as a unit. Remove the 3 screws and the calendar plate. Remove the hour wheel and the two date maintaining plates, followed by the date ring. Remove the minute wheel, intermediate gears and the date change gear. We also remove the date jumper and the small date setting gear that is held in place by the jumper. Remove the cannon pinion and its attached gear along with the date advancement gear. We now have just the keyless work remaining! Next up is the setting lever spring Next remove the yoke Now the setting lever and the remaining lever. Finally the winding pinion and the sliding pinion. And that's the full disassembly of this very nice movement. I mentioned earlier that I needed to be a bit creative reassembling the reserve mechanism. Since the reserve mechanism is replaced after the calendar plate is installed, the jewels on the dial side must already be lubricated (since they will be hidden by the calendar plate). So this implies that the barrel and wheel train are already installed. Problem is that with the barrel installed it is very difficult to get the reserve mechanism seated correctly. I ended up doing the following: 1. Reassemble the wheel train and barrel. 2. Lubricate all dial side jewels and bearings 3. Install the calendar mechanism 4. Remove the barrel and train of wheels. Note that the issue is really the barrel, but you cannot remove the barrel without also removing the train 5. Now it is trivial to install the reserve mechanism and orient it as mentioned at the time it was disassembled 6. Taking care not to allow the reserve mechanism to rotate (and become misaligned), reinstall the train and barrel And that's all there is to it! Hopefully someone finds this useful. At the end of the day, the watch now runs perfectly after a good cleaning and lubrication. Stu...
    4 points
  25. I've used a mainspring calculator which in an excel spreadsheet. I'll see if I can post it. Which I can't, but it looks like this... If anyone wants this, I can put it in the cloud and give you a link to download it. It's really useful and got me out of a few scrapes not knowing the spring size, as one wasn't present. The last one I used this with was a 100 year old trench watch which I calculated the spring from the arbor and barrel dimensions and got 290 to 300 degrees out of it. What a result! So, this does work well. I find coming down half to one strength when converting from blue steel to alloy mainspring helps from experience. It certainly isn't a direct swap size for size.
    4 points
  26. Not sure the following will help you @signcarverbut I made the following note in my book where I record my experiences and thoughts in watch repair. Replacing the arbor. Insert the arbor so that the arbor hook goes in where the innermost coil has its widest section (between the innermost and second innermost coil) to facilitate getting the arbor inside the innermost coil. Then, using brass tweezers, rotate the arbor so that the arbor hook goes into the eye of the innermost coil. I also made the following "ugly" illustration. With some movements, it's a very tight fit, for example, Vostok movements. Hope it helps!
    4 points
  27. Anything with an ETA 2824 - they're still being made by the millions and you can actually buy parts for it. In fact, in some cases, parts for Sellita SW200's will also work in it, plus it's cheaper. They're actually simpler to work on than the 7S26's you've been messing with.
    4 points
  28. Radiation (although a more serious situation) is a bit like lubrication in that there can be many opinions along a spectrum with no true right answer. On one hand there is no absolute "safe" level of radiation exposure, but on the other hand a risk/benefit analysis can be done so as not to simply turn our backs on anything involving radiation that has benefits for our lives. (Sorry if that came out preachy!) In industry and medicine, when we need to work with radiation the guiding concept for exposure is "ALARA" which stands for As Low As Reasonably Achievable. The tools to accomplish this are Time, Distance and Shielding. So for those that want to minimize their exposure to the (sometimes quite significant) radiation coming from old lumed hands and dials, those concepts can be used. Keeping it outside of your body is the first concern (there would then be zero distance) so masks, gloves, disposable plastic drapes, etc. are useful as mentioned in posts above. Keeping things damp can minimize contaminated dust generation, so if you are sanding or scraping off old lume, keep the tools and parts wet. But even then, there is radiation being emanated from lume even in a closed watch or a sealed bag of hands, so precautions shouldn't stop there. Doing things quickly, and maybe not using your "hottest" vintage watch as a daily wear item can leverage the time aspect. Thought of in this way, you can find other ways to avoid prolonged exposure, such as not storing your stash of old hands in the drawer right below the working surface you spend hours hovering over. I do think it's a good idea for everyone working in this area to have one of the inexpensive radiation meters - you can't balance the risks if you don't know the relative magnitude of what you are working with. There is another wrinkle - Radon (a radioactive gas) is generated as radium decays, and one study found that a collection of a dozen or so radioactive watches in a poorly ventilated area could lead to elevated radon levels, so how and where you store hot materials can also take that into consideration.
    4 points
  29. Progress. I disassembled the motor, cleaned it, oiled the bearings, and re-wired it. The housing for one of the brushes was busted, so I 3D printed a threaded cover and a screw that functions very nearly like the original. I tested the motor and it works. Now to rebuild the rest of the machine.
    4 points
  30. Well I guess if quartz isn't your thing, then maybe a little bit of a Timex treat will brighten up your day. A 1977 Timex Marlin (26160 02477) joins the club following a couple of hydrocarbon baths and a lot of scrubbing and polishing. I also recently picked up a job lot of of NOS 1970s watch bands. Some were perhaps beyond saving, but there were a couple of denim straps that really ooze that 1970 vibe, so what better paring can you think of.
    4 points
  31. For hole jewels, there are ones with straight sided holes and ones with olive holes as you have seen. Olive holes have curved hole walls, straight are self explanatory. Olive hole jewels reduce contact area and thus friction, and are generally used in areas that are most sensitive, like balance/ fork/ escape wheel. They also generally (not always) have a convex face opposite the oil sink. The convex face further reduces friction when used with a shouldered pivot, and when used with a cap jewel (oil sink facing the arbor/staff) promotes capillary attraction of the oil between the jewel face and the cap jewel. Many old high grade watches have convex faces on all the jewels. Some may also have olive hole jewels up to the escape wheel or further. If replacing a jewel, certainly go for olive hole with convex face for a balance, and it's a better choice for other places if the size is available.
    4 points
  32. Hi I have seen his site, pretty useful there is also welwynwatchparts.co.uk who are of the same ilk selling second user parts, worth a look for the future.
    4 points
  33. I'm in Australia, so parts/movements are fairly difficult to come by or just too pricey in general. I found this company in The Netherlands called speedtimerkollektion that sell job lots of parts, movements, cases etc for all kinds of watches. I managed to get 4x defective 7009a's plus shipping for $38 AUS. That's about the same price as one of the cheapest Mumbai specials on eBay. Time will tell if it was a worthwhile purchase or not, but I figure at least I'll have enough spares to get one working movement out of the lot.
    4 points
  34. I picked up a bunch of ex retail display stands from ebay. I snagged 30 of them for six quid, which I thought was a suitable price for displaying a bunch of 404 club watches. They are a little scruffy in the sense that some of them still have sticky residue from the old price stickers, and some even had the original stickers still attached, so I thought why waste those. Here are eight mechanicals and one bizarracle, from the 404 club, for your amusement. I'll clean up the rest of the sticky mess from these and probably leave them blank, although I might print a small detail card for each one I display. Oh.. and for those of you who were wondering if I was managing to keep the new watch bench immaculately clean... well mostly, but there is a fair bit of clutter on it at the moment.
    4 points
  35. Those special pinvices are rather costly and rare, and different sizes will be needed. You could make (I did once) your own one with low cost. Take a cheap indian sliding pinvice (#330, its opening is zero) and a jewellers burr with ball shaped tip of appropriate diameter. Then mill the center of the pinvice to the needed depth. The mouth of the pinvice is mild steel. It will last and keep its shape for very long. Frank
    4 points
  36. I wanted to post an update on how my project was "progressing" As @grsnoviand @JohnR725already remarked, swapping parts of old movements may cause problems. Even though the donor movement has the same diameter, has the same look, has the same number and has been made by the same manufacture; just about NOTHING did fit. Earlier I tried to swap just the balance assembly of the donor but GGF's watch wasn't happy. I tried the combination of donor escape-wheel / pallet fork / balance assembly, but the escape-wheel prevented the wheel-train from running smoothly. So I tried just the pallet-fork / balance assembly ... that didn't work either. Back to the idea of swapping the whole donor movement in GGF's case. GGF's dial fitted, but GGF's hour-hand was too big for the donors hour-wheel. So I changed the donor hour-wheel for GGF's. GGF's minute hand did kinda fit, but GGF's little seconds hand just dropped over the donors seconds-pivot, so I had to use the too long donors seconds-hand Attempting to get this already Franken in GGF's case didn't work very well either. I probably could make it to fit, but that meant modification to GGF's case and that was for me a step too far. I reversed to whole process, all the parts belonging to the donor back to the donor and what belonged to GGF's back to GGF's watch. To avoid any mix-up, the donor movement is back in its own case, with its own dial & hands, ticking happily away. It seems that there is only one way forwards, and that's restoring / repairing the original GGF's-parts, in this case mainly the balance assembly; restoring the hairspring / replacing the missing timing-screws / getting the balance in time and do the poising. Delicate work which, apart from manipulating hairsprings, I haven't done before. It seems to me a bit of a "Do or die" scenario, with no room for error Lots of work done with no real results, but valuable lessons learned
    4 points
  37. New macro focus rail. 18 images focus-merged. Didn't think about the fact that the second sweep and minute hand would move during the 18 separate exposures (so a quick edit to replace the whole second hand dial).
    4 points
  38. You realize that all of this is based on a assumption? The assumption is that because they look the same that they must actually be the same. In other words that you can swap the parts. Often times with vintage and howl vintage is this watch? Do we establish a timeframe of its birth? Often times with vintage watches the parts are hand fit this means swapping the donor into the original may require modifications. It's always a conceivability of that they may not swap at all. You should come and work in a modern watch shop they do movement swapping all of the time. Any time a watch doesn't work especially a quartz but some mechanicals now that you swap the movement and no one gives it a second thought is just a component of really big component with lots of subcomponents. This is an interesting idea because it would give you a running watch to carry and show Often nobody's I care whether it's the original movement or not you will. Then you can restore the original movement and put it back in again and nobody's going to know either way annual have a spare movement just in case.
    4 points
  39. Hello All; I managed to get the little booklet originally supplied with a Boley's staking set. It shows where the punches belong, their numbers & sizes and a cross-section of the tool. Minor detail; it's in German, but that's to keep the excitement going I scanned and converted it to a PDF file. Perhaps it has been uploaded before but better one time too much than nothing at all Boley set.pdf
    4 points
  40. It's a roller table remover.
    4 points
  41. Hi Rob If you start with Fried, Donald De Carle, you wont go wrong. I have attached one for your interest. The Chicago one is in bits but its all there 1156193141_JosephBulovaSchoolofWatchMaking(1).pdf chicago lesson 1.PDF chicago lesson 10.PDF chicago lesson 11.PDF chicago lesson 12.PDF chicago lesson 13.PDF chicago lesson 14.PDF chicago lesson 15.PDF chicago lesson 16.PDF chicago lesson 17.PDF chicago lesson 18.PDF chicago lesson 19.PDF chicago lesson 2.PDF chicago lesson 20.PDF chicago lesson 21.PDF chicago lesson 22.PDF chicago lesson 23.PDF chicago lesson 24.PDF chicago lesson 25.PDF chicago lesson 26.PDF chicago lesson 27.PDF chicago lesson 28.PDF chicago lesson 29.PDF chicago lesson 3.PDF chicago lesson 30.PDF chicago lesson 31.PDF 588239796_chicagolesson32Part1.pdf chicago lesson 32 Part 2.PDF chicago lesson 33.PDF chicago lesson 34.PDF chicago lesson 35.PDF chicago lesson 4.PDF chicago lesson 5.PDF chicago lesson 6.PDF chicago lesson 7.PDF chicago lesson 8.PDF chicago lesson 9.PDF 468703549_ToolsMaterialsoftheTrade.PDF
    4 points
  42. Can you post a pic of the dial side? Your escape wheel has a conical pivot on the lower side, which means it should work with a cap jewel. If the cap jewel is missing, or if the wheel was replaced with one needing one, it would cause exactly the issue you are seeing.
    4 points
  43. If it's spring loaded, it's just a "normal fitting" ? What I'd do, is make sure the crown is screwed on fully, and the stem pushed in. Then using callipers, measure the distance shown - you don't need the number, just leave the callipers at that setting. Then holding the stem in a pin vice, remove the crown and measure, from the end of the stem, the amount to remove using the callipers. Mark with a felt pen, then cut and file (to slightly longer at first), and try the fit. When happy with the fit, Loctite the crown. SEE CORRECTION BELOW
    4 points
  44. How long is "eventually" ? Sounds like something is dragging in the motion work, the gearing that moves the hands. Try pulling the canon pinion and see if the watch still stops.
    4 points
  45. Welcome Vince. You have come to the right place for the help you need. Practice for a while on movements with no value to you before risking the reminder of your dad.
    3 points
  46. It's hard to put a value on it. I have several, all Steiner (Horia now), and paid as low as 70 bucks for a basic set, which was a terrific deal, to several hundred for a larger set, which I also considered a good deal. A friend of mine recently got a large set Steiner for about 350 and was happy with that price. Steiner do go for a premium; I would say a set like yours, without a box, really should be under 100 and closer to 50. Getting over 100 I recommend trying to wait out for a deal on a Steiner. Yes, if you will be holding the burnisher in the left hand you will want the "D" model (droit). The reason for the confusion, as far as I can tell, is the naming came about with the idea that the tool would be used on the underside of a pivot being spun in a lathe, which reverses things. The difference is the location of the radius and the slant on the non-radius side, which is slanted so that a true square shoulder can be made. You might get lucky and find a Favorite burnisher. These have a carbide rectangle with 3 different radii and one flat edge, and can be flipped end for end in the handle for right or left hand use.
    3 points
  47. casually from memory I remember there are two different designs for ruby cylinders so there were probably other makers. But no matter what making the cylinder is an interesting thing to do and they tended to be fragile. I knew somebody that once needed a replacement cylinder the problem was on their particular style of the entire end was missing that wasn't just making a new Ruby cylinder it was figuring out what the entire rest of it was. So other than getting to look at it that's as far as the project went. then in Daniel's book he actually tells how to make the cylinder. For those people have a little extra time on their hands and need an extra project.
    3 points
  48. Thank you all for the super valuable help. I have finally figured it out this morning. There was a microscopic string of fiber between the wheel and the finger which cause friction when the screw was tightened. I have now completed my first full service for a Seiko 5 gifted to me by my father when I graduated high school. Brought new life to this almost 40 years old watch. I am super happy for being able to complete this project. Now to my next project, a Hamilton 992b. Ronen
    3 points
  49. Here is the clock cased and running. I got the bob today...boy on a fence. Also got a key for it but got the wrong size for the regulator. Had to expand it to fit the shaft and also turn it to fit in the dial hole. It is running fine...soon to go home.
    3 points
  50. Hi Guys My Ha'penneth In the vid supplied by Mikepilk the Gentleman used a Horia Jeweling tool to do the job, His statement was that it did not distort the arms as they were SUPPORTED, depending on the strength of the rivit defines the pressure required to remove it. The K&D tools support the arms and punch the rivit out all methods seem to be viable and used, but have the potential to enlarge the hole where the staff fits. That is compensated by spreading the rivit a bit wider when re fitting, as long as the arms are flat and true all will be well. But the age old method of cutting the hub or rivit off in the lathe, if done correctly is the best bearing in mind a steady hand is required so as not to remove any metal from the balance. Discussions like this have many Pro,s and Con's as the methods used by every one differ and have their disciples.
    3 points
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