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  1. Slow day at the office again today. So I practised some micro welding. I got this Bally's ladies watch for about $10. The caseback says Bulova but the movement says PUW 211O2T. The movement is in great condition but the battery clamp was broken. So I fashioned the broken part out of a flatten piece of stainless steel wire and micro tig welded it to the old battery clamp. Not the prettiest specimen but it works.
    9 points
  2. I think we have become overly OCD about beat error. Before the invention of timegraphers, what did watchmakers do? They just line up the balance jewel with the pallet fork by sight and that was it. I think the error could be out by 1.0ms.
    7 points
  3. I haven't done one of these for a while..... My latest acquisition with a Record 107 movement, and on my first attempt at making a strap (no apologies for the dodgy stitching). Came in as a non-runner, turned out to be a broken M/S so easily sorted. I was tempted to have a go at re-plating the case but I think it carries off the brassing rather well.
    6 points
  4. Was bored and nothing else to do so I finished these builds. The vintage pilot X caliber 3307, 40mm in pvd and stainless steel plus the 41mm Trench watch with a swiss caliber 6498 large sub seconds
    5 points
  5. I have a tool that moves the roller table in very precise increments for fine tuning the beat error. I only used it on one caliber I used to do for a small manufacturer, it's not terribly practical for everyday use. It has a table with a collet in the center that clamps on the roller table, then a finger clamp that holds the balance rim. The table turns around the collet, with index marks so you know how far you went. You can very easily turn the roller table a fraction of a degree, and then go back exactly the same if you want. For every day work, from the smallest ladies movements to marine chonometer, I set the balance with the cock on a bench block so the roller table is in a hole, balance on the block. Lift up the cock and move it over- not flipping it, just moving laterally, until I can see the slot in the hairspring collet, get in there and adjust (for tiny watches this is usually with an oiler, larger, a small screwdriver). Go back in the watch and check on the machine. If you have no idea which way to move, like when you are very close and the fork looks perfectly centered, you can check like this: let off all power, hold the balance rim, then nudge the center wheel so an escape tooth contact a pallet stone. See where it contacts. Rotate balance so an escape tooth can contact the other pallet stone, observe. This is with zero power on the watch so the balance really truly finds its neutral position. If, for example, a tooth hits the front part of the entry stone, and the last part of the exit stone, you can rotate the balance to see which way it needs to go (here the balance need to turn counter-clockwise from its rest state, so the hairspring needs to go clockwise).
    5 points
  6. I have recently used a jacot tool to successfully re-polish a badly worn pivot in a pocket watch the first time in my life. I have watched Richard's videos about it and I also went to a book printed in the same year I was born in 1976. This book is written in Hungarian and was one of the book used by the state sponsored and only one watchmaker school as far as I understand. (To my knowledge you cannot learn watchmaking any longer in Hungary as of now.) I scanned the corresponding pages as how to re-finish a pivot including the usage of a jacot tool. It was a great help to me so I thought I share these pages with you. After scanning the pages i sent the pdf through a pdf to txt engine then sentence by sentence I translated the Hungarian text to English. I learnt watchmaking in English and it might sound strange but the Hungarian name of the parts and methods were unknown to me. This added some more difficulty on top of the fact that my English is far from perfect. I am writing this because I am not sure how good the end result is. If anyone feels that could correct the text so it would be more readable or would make better sense please do so. Enjoy if you can. jacot_tool.pdf jacot_tool_Kopasok_javitasa_magyar.txt jacot_tool_repairing_wear.txt
    5 points
  7. Hi all, I have uploaded a pdf copy of the Generale Ressorts catalogue. So that you can make yourself a hard copy. Handy to have in the drawer. (sometimes!). Even the pdf seems to be hard to find. Cheers Graziano. GeneraleRessorts.pdf
    4 points
  8. Thought you guys might be interested in this. It is a bit tricky and requires a steady had, but it is possible.
    4 points
  9. This is the intro, the book is 135 pages long and my scanner's very slow so it's going to take a bit longer than I thought... a Sunday job. KIF Spare Material Catalogue P1-17.pdf
    4 points
  10. I bought this tool on Ebay. I know what it is for--have seen a video about it. My reason for buying it was simply because it is a beautiful tool. Not sure if there is any real use I can bring to it, but I do plan on fitting a couple of wheels on it just for grins.
    4 points
  11. Well... That took forever... I have very very bad internet (<.5 mbps on a good day and very unstable to boot), so I don't like to upload photos very often. We're having some work done on the house in preparation for winter, and my wife took the baby away to not be around potentially infectious strangers, so I have the whole half meg to myself! Over the last few months, I've managed to score enough 404 wins that I haven't been able to find a gap when there wasn't something en route since the last photo I posted! I obviously have a type: All stainless, fully jeweled, European movements. I've taken a stab here at a Russian and Indian movement, and will probably try to find a Chinese one just to round it out (I've got Japanese covered already). Being a little picky keeps me from drowning in the things, and hopefully gives me a shot at making a few bucks on these when and if I ever get around to putting some finished ones up for sale! Here's the whole lot since that red jump hour a month or two ago. Ignore the Slava. I thought it was 404, but I stretched for it, and the photo is already uploaded. Everything is flipped, and otherwise in the same orientation. Ditto, now open. HMT. A little corrosion on the ratchet wheel, but otherwise this is the cleanest watch I've come across superficially. Technically, I cheated a little, and won the auction at $9.50, but that included free shipping, so I'm counting it anyway. If this one regulates out OK, I may not mess with it much. If this Clinton cleans up OK, this might be a handsome enough watch to hold onto, at least for a while. I'm a sucker for cushiony cases, and I need something a bit dressier than my daily driver for those occasions. This is an interesting one... "Garuda" is the name on the dial, but it has the Seiko "5" logo. Came out of China, which may explain the pretty obvious trademark infringement. From what I was able to find while no one was outbidding me, the brand used everything from jewelless pin levers up to mid-level Swiss movements. I took a gamble on it as there were no movement photos in the listing, but 21 jewels and an all stainless case seemed promising. That said, the movement is supposed to be 21 Jewels, but it looks like the cap jewel plate is missing so I may have been ripped off for some jewels. It's possible I have another watch somewhere with the same movement that I can salvage from if need be. Also, I can't see the escape wheel, but the balance is real chintzy looking, and it might be a pin lever escapement. The crystal has some interesting faceting as well, but I'm just going to replace it and not really spend any time trying to polish it up or find a matching one. Interesting watch. I think it's the only one of the whole lot that doesn't run at least briefly. Full disclosure, this one is not technically a 404, but the photos are uploaded... I've wanted to fiddle with one of these double mainspring high jewel Russian movements for a while, but I can't stand plated brass cases that every. Russian. Watch. Ever. is cased in. This is an export model, and is either in really good shape, or all stainless. Big modern size too. This one is a Frankenwatch... The case back says it's all stainless, but upon receipt I discovered that the case is actually plated brass. Formerly plated in a number of places as well. Lame... No bid deal though, because 404 and.... This guy has a pretty rough looking movement, but is actually stainless! I might just swap the Canoe movement and dial over, and have a decent enough watch in the end after all. And, because it's 404, no sweat! Last and probably least is this guy. All stainless and fully jeweled, so it's got that going for it. Handsome enough as well. I don't think it runs for more than a few seconds, and I'm not sure what's going on with the movement/dial. The dial is loose and turned a few degrees. It was straight in the listing, but arrived askew. At least it's not glued in place or something. Also, I think the movement is also loose in the case despite the spacer. Probably another frankenwatch, but won't know until I get into it. If the dial feet are broken off, there's not much I'll be able to do immediately. I might have a movement spacer, but it might go into the parts tray. So that's what I've been up to lately. I often only have an hour or two in the evening to screw around, and trolling eBay every few days for 404 fodder is a great way to while away an evening. Almost as great as reviving them!
    4 points
  12. I designed the synthesizer and VCO for the DSP on an integrated circuits used in disk drives (circa 1995). These designs went into WD, Seagate, and Quantum disk drives. The VCO was slaved to the synthesizer (which was slaved to a crystal oscillator) and was designed to be adjusted according to where the read head was on the rotating disk (inside radius slower than when at the outside edge of the disk). What we discovered was that as you dial the VCO near the frequency of the synthesizer, it just locked in and would not budge until you pushed it well past the reference frequency given by the synthesizer. Wow...we were scratching our heads. Somebody on the team discovered that we were not the first do notice this issue. Christiaan Huygens also discovered that when clocks mounted on the same beam while closely regulated, will synchronize themselves. In modern times, we call this "injection locking." This bit of insight was exciting for me...being the son of a watchmaker.
    4 points
  13. Did you know that watch jewel fluoresce under UV light? I learnt that here on WRT. You can try looking for your missing jewels with a UV torch and the room lights turned off. I wished I knew that a couple of years ago when I lost a pallet jewel.
    4 points
  14. I would agree is an outstanding grease it's now my favorite. As far as speculation goes why speculate if you have the tech sheet? Oh wait Swatch has gotten clever now they conveniently failed to mention what that white stuff is but in the older tech sheet it tells you exactly what it is. there is really is no mystery if you have the right tech sheet which I'm attaching. okay apparently I'm not attaching as there is now a warning message as you can no longer attach Acrobat files? So there's a way around that all just snip out the relevant image.
    4 points
  15. If you find you start doing escapement work an electric heater is definitely more convenient than an alcohol lamp. There is of course the very expensive Bergeon heating plate with electronic temp control, but if you scour Ebay you can find small lab heating plates surplus for less. You can definitely get it to zero just by manipulating the collet. I do some vintage after sales service for a big brand, pieces often from the 1920s up to 60s; they expect the beat error to be under 1ms in all positions. It's not easy or fun to do on a tiny delicate movement, but definitely doable.
    4 points
  16. Hello fellow members, hope you all are well. And I hope your families are well during these times.
    4 points
  17. Bulova Seaking Automatic from 1975 I believe. Just restored and serviced this for my next door neighbour. It's 'on test' for the next day. He told me he got it for his tenth wedding anniversary and has been in a drawer for 25 years or so. Going to give it back to him tomorrow evening. I hope he will be pleased to wear it again.
    4 points
  18. .. and a small collection of NOS Morellato straps for a pocket money price, 'cos if you can never have enough watches, then it stands to reason that you can never have enough watch straps.
    4 points
  19. Seiko 7025-5010 1978 blue dial, just finished.
    3 points
  20. you're seeing several things go on like look up your AS cal. 1686 made around 1960 then the Unitas cal. 6325 made somewhere between 1965 and 1970 how many years ago was that? 51 years and how long are the Swiss supposed to supply parts for their watches? then a very long time ago I did hear a number of how long they were supposed to supply parts but I'm pretty sure it wasn't 50 years. Then when it came to the electronic watches that was a much shorter time span. then there's a problem with mainsprings got your catalog go to the back section where they list the mainsprings by size. Start counting how many different mainsprings there supposed to supply and how many different mainsprings is that? While you're counting the mainsprings look at all the different names and brands I wonder how many of those ever get serviced? the unfortunate reality is for a company they can't keep making mainsprings forever especially if there's a limited demand for them.
    3 points
  21. If anyone is wondering ... The Cyclonic enables the watchmaker to check all the mechanical functions of a quartz movement both quickly and thoroughly. The supplementary test facilities for displaying the motor drive pulse and checking the battery state complete a comprehensive functional investigation on the watch. Solidified oil and dirt can be released from the bearings by rotating the gear train rapidly. This usually enables a blocked movement to be brought back into operation again which is often the only possibility to repair a watch that cannot be dismantled.
    3 points
  22. Ah yes Magnetism can be a watchmakers friend ,in more ways than one. Picking up lost parts and to get to work........
    3 points
  23. I'm just about to head out to the shops sporting this Avia 17 Jewel today.
    3 points
  24. Those marks are clockmakers repair identification marks and numbers. Don't try and work out there meaning because many clockmakers have their own code. I don't think that is the original pendulum. That number is just the movement number. If you are getting it repaired professionally I would expect to see all the screws have the burr removed and all screws that are blued to be re-blued this goes for not just the back plate but also the front . Any re-bushing that is needed to be done so you cannot see the repairs. All the brass should be polished by hand not by some machine and it should never be put in an ultrasonic cleaner as they can cause stress fractures in brass. Tell them this is what must be done if they can't do it take it to someone who can.
    3 points
  25. That’s a great guide! I would only add that you should be very careful with the incabloc on the main plate, and place a small piece of rodico in the gap indicated by the arrow, when moving the shock spring. The incabloc shock spring can fly out of that gap when you move the shock spring.
    3 points
  26. Thank you for pointing out my mistake, due to superficiality. I went to look to the "stock springs list" by the British company more closely. First thing that one can notice is that the O.D. starts at 6mm, which could be right for a 12mm balance wheel, something like a 13"" mov.t! Based on that only, I suppose these are not wristwatch, and possibly not even clock hairspring. Rather, have been made for a variety of other devices, like speedometers, detonation timers, pressure meters, just like their home page says. Then looking at the quoted Torque for a same O.D. we see that it varies largely, even about 200 times for 7mm O.D. springs. Unlike what we learn from the old tables, that the CGS# is very related to the balance diameter. Another clue is the "custom springs" pages, the parameters on "how to choose a material" are not like anything related to watchmaking. Despite the oscillator instrument in the tiny picture on the home page, nothing says or suggest that these are in fact, horological hairsprings. Conclusion, IMHO it is safe to disregars this source for watch repair needs. I apologize for any confusion I may have caused when trying to compare oranges to apples.
    3 points
  27. Hello, for me it is a bit painful to find the right english word for the technical terms used here. CGS numbers were invented by 'the hairspring industry' (in fact profs Guillaume and Donat) to overcome old arbitrary classifications like 'strength number' and 'size number' to get hairsprings calculable in the CGS (the units) system. That helped to quickly and exactly determine a needed spring instead of 'trying' a spring. CGS number is a parameter, not a torque dimensional. To get the torque*, you have to divide the CGS number by the squared diameter of the hairspring. * you get the 'deflecting force' D, eqivalent to the 'spring constant' of linear springs. Torque M = D * angle(rad). D is the torque @ 57deg deflection. If you alter the length/diameter of a given hairspring, you will also alter its 'D' - so it is not appropriate to generally specify a hairspring. CGS number is however. The formula to find the right hairspring was posted by dadistic already. However you need to have one hairspring with any known CGS number. Tables help to come into the ballpark, but are not determined enough. Don't know if Joe wants to go that route, but I compressed the procedure in the attached pdf. If you calculated the correct CGS #, next imho bigger issue is to find such spring. The British comp. may have it, but is not helpful finding it, their 'Torque' data are unclear. In contrast to me, jdm found their information sufficient, maybe he can help you. But factor 1.75 cannot be right, you were still off by some decimals compared to an expected CGS #. Frank CGS_INFOe.pdf
    3 points
  28. 3 points
  29. As I understand it the Chronoglide video is saying the larger (well, for a watchmaker) ultrasonics are too powerful. Ultrasonics have been used in watch cleaning machines for at least 60 years though. But that guy also uses automatic cleaning machines that don't have ultrasonic, maybe he's justifying that position (I have the same Greiner ACS 900 he has, and it came to me without ultrasonic. It was 2000 bucks to add the driver board and tank, and I'm very happy to have done it...). I do clean parts in a larger Elma quite often, but mostly components I've made for customers. I have to say I've never had a problem with it damaging anything. I and everyone I know cleans the balance in the cleaning machine, with ultrasonic. I have never had an issue with roller jewels coming out, even when I used a machine that had warm isopropyl alcohol as a rinse. I think Karl's theory of a manufacturing defect is probably correct. Spectre- how long were the parts in the cleaner? I remember someone left a movement in some L&R 111A over the weekend at school once and the plating was destroyed. On that note, with my cleaning machine I can set the time in each bath; with the ultrasonic I find that 5 or 6 minutes is plenty. I think with the non-ultrasonic machines folks tend to do 10-15 minutes, which, if you think about it, might cause more damage than the supposedly damaging ultrasonics, haha.
    3 points
  30. And so Galileo began dropping items from the Pisa tower to prove his point, then Newton introduced the (earth) gravitational constant, then etc, etc, after 3,000 years of science and notation changes we the peasants are left depending on Google while some government keep legal measuring in inches, nails, short medium and long tons.
    3 points
  31. Many thanks again for the help on this one! In the spirit of learning I'll keep going in both directions, trying to source a part while I make a replacement. The references above are great - clearly I need to keep working on identification and cross-referencing skills with the catalogs and various other sources. Looks like a chance to revive the old army identification skills with those decks of cards that showed silhouettes of planes and tanks (now adapted to watch parts). A rough-in of the replacement is shown below. I've filed and shaped it a bit more but may start over to give it another try. Quick summary of the process: Started with metal from a feeler gauge Punched the screw hole Attached the broken part to the steel with Shoo Goo Roughed in the shape (very slowly) using a cutoff wheel on a Dremel Shifted over to various files for the final shaping Will keep everyone posted on the outcome!
    3 points
  32. For pinning at the collet, in school we modified a pair of #5 tweezers, blunting them somewhat and then shortening one tip; this allows the long tip to push while the short one still has some purchase on the collet, leaving the hole free. It would be hard to make a slotted tweezer that would work at that dimension, but they could be useful elsewhere nonetheless. I have pliers I have modified as such for removing and replacing pins on clock movements.
    3 points
  33. I have a recipe that was published by Gruen, I think it was during the war for "getting things done". It's not that different from the Finnish recipe I use for clocks. Gruen recipe: 1 ounce oleic acid 2 ounces acetone 4 ounces 22% ammonia 25 ounces distilled water The oleic acid and ammonia combine to form a soap*. Oleic and oxalic are quite different; oleic is essentially pure fat and liquid, where oxalic is from my experience crystalline, that is perhaps why the addition of some soap in the above recipe. Rinse in distilled water 2x and finish in isopropyl alcohol, dry in warm air. *The most traditional soap is some kind of fat mixed with sodium hydroxide, or lye, a very strong base. Ammonia is less basic than lye, but works great and also has its own cleaning action.
    3 points
  34. I hated science. The teacher I had always kept hitting me on my head with books because I was always messing about.
    3 points
  35. Coincidentally I've posted that recently. Here how it's taught in watchmaking school: https://watchmakingjourney.com/2014/08/16/last-week-final-project-colleting-and-studding-hairsprings/
    3 points
  36. You might find rodico work as well or better than grease, worth a try. I got no lathe and sharpen tips of old pins with backward strokes on a fine sandpaper, flies off couple times,but as long as you can find it one pin would do. Regs
    3 points
  37. He advises against using an ulta sonic bath for watch parts. They should only be used for watch bracelets the case and the case back.
    3 points
  38. Google in their infinite wisdom has changed the link format for shared content. As a result the old links that I had shared on Google Drive no longer work correctly. Here is a new link to the Timex Documents collection, hopefully folks will spot this one first when they search. Timex Documents The following is a direct link to the Timex service manuals folder. Timex Service Manuals
    3 points
  39. This what I used to adjust the collets on clocks and pocket watches. It's probably too big for a ladies watch. I don't remember where I learnt this from I slip the tool between the hairspring and balance cock and insert the sharp tooth of the tool into the split of the collet. Then I can turn the collet in whatever direction I choose.
    3 points
  40. As correctly noted above the connector looks familiar but it's not what you're thinking it is. This is the one you want it fits perfectly.. https://www.ebay.com/itm/221445284681 I purchased the connectors for an unfinished project that would be helpful. The Chinese machines lack audio and the ability to listen to the watch especially if you're having problems is really important.. The ability to listen to the watch and see if it actually is an audio problem or something else. The easiest way to get audio from the timing machines is to hack the microphone.. Using a pair of the connectors you can make a pass through I would put it in a Metal box though so it shielded.. This way the microphone and continue to function like it's supposed to and you have access to everything you need to have audio. In other words it should be relatively easy if you have the time which I seem to be lacking to put an audio device on your timing machine and then listen to the watch and be unhappy with how horrible it can sound. Then I'm not joking about how horrible it can sound I have a horrible sounding watch currently at work I have to deal with it sounds very very bad... But at least in the audio I know why the timing machines unhappy with the watch. With the audio you take away a lot of the mysteries that you see on the timing machine. For testing purposes the watch should run just fine without lubricants. You might actually find the reality is a watch runs better without lubricants because all lubricants tend to have a dampening effect. On the other hand try to run your watch over long periods of time with out lubricant and see what effect that has it's usually not good. But there can be an issue with the lubrication of the escapement.. They get carried away with the 9415 then that's definitely an issue and will cause Amplitude loss as it tends to be sticky if it's applied way too heavily. The lubrication aspect is interesting because George Daniels was very very unhappy with Omega.. Look at the tech sheet for the coaxial escapement and you find lubrication but my understanding is it's not used as lubrication.. It's used to dampen the impact of the escapement but it still required. Defeating the whole purpose this escapement of not requiring a lubrication..
    3 points
  41. Winding wheel is missing a few teeth. Is the seller selling you this as genuine? Does he accept return?
    3 points
  42. Finally got around to install the Indian vice on my new bench. Turns out that the base is actually chromed brass. I used wood inserts and SS socket screws. There weren't many choices but right above the drawer has the advantage that all I need to do is to open it and place a plastic bag to catch filings. After use it stays put in the same cardboard it came in. The red "visette" is another handy Cousins cheapie which I have already corrected for jaws and slide alignment, but I still have to find a way to fix on the thick bench.
    3 points
  43. This is the first watch I ever bought. 1976. Still love it. I have put a better strap on it though.
    3 points
  44. I just finished a similar project, and wanted to put an update here on the crystal, to help future searchers. The Sternkreuz FBA 321.701 is also a good replacement for this watch. The GS CY 934-17 is not. I was able to source the Sternkreuz through Cousins. Here's a photo of the completed watch. Happy jumping! Dave
    2 points
  45. Just curious... did you lubricate the pallet jewels or the escape wheel teeth?
    2 points
  46. Try adjusting gain control.
    2 points
  47. Purchased a new one from Cousins. There is however an issue while on test overnight it stopped. After a lot of fiddling I stripped down again and found a tooth broken off the barrel. I normally check all of the wheels and pivots when I strip with my microscope but it’s light ring had broken and so I did not inspect closely. My mistake and since found the fault re microscope it’s light source is via fibre optics cable and the units projector lamp had failed. The new lamp and barrel are on order. what fun
    2 points
  48. Hello all. It’s been a while since I logged in here to chat. I discovered Facebook and found Mark’s Facebook forum which is keeping me occupied. I do feel compelled to return however to check out one of my all time favourite threads, “Lew & Me”. Well since last logging in, I have gained another stray. My wife and I discovered this little tabby fellow soaking wet, shivering and near his end whilst we were out walking in the woods one day. Happy to say he has now been adopted by us and in fine fetter. His name is ‘Monty’, and settled in perfectly. Thankfully he is not as interested in watches as is his ginger step-brother Joey
    2 points
  49. Power off, stud cap screws loose, insert stud. HS in pins, wiggle watch a little so everything settles. Screw down stud cap screws. From there, if you need to adjust anything adjust- beat error, move the hs collet. HS not centered in regulator pins, adjust. HS not flat, centered overall, adjust. Ideally with everything "relaxed" and snugging up the stud cap it should all be good. But a watch this age has seen many watchmakers and probably needs some loving.
    2 points
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