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VWatchie

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VWatchie last won the day on January 12

VWatchie had the most liked content!

About VWatchie

  • Rank
    WRT Addict
  • Birthday 06/01/1962

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Stockholm, Sweden
  • Interests
    Watches, playing the violin, tennis, C#, SQL, JavaScript

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  1. I never expect anything and haven't yet done a single Japanese watch (an Orient model EV0S004B with a calibre 46E40 is in the pipe), but I must say, PUSH being written on the movement seems very convenient.
  2. I just want to report that oldswisswatches.com have refunded me for the parts that I was not satisfied with. Mr. Sudarson has been very kind and accommodating in this matter. Again, I do not recommend against oldswisswatches.com, but given my dissatisfying experience I strongly advise that you ask for pictures and negotiate the price accordingly before placing you order.
  3. I've spent a lot of time and a ton of money trying to get an optimal magnification solution. I wear glasses and the the only really well working clip-on I've found is Bergeon's ARY clip-ons. You can see them here. Nevertheless, I do not use this clip-on or any other lupes as I want to take advantage of the fact that I have two eyes and hence have stereo vision which helps immensely to determine distance when working with tweezers, etc. Instead I use magnification glasses (seen in this post) and a stereo microscope for all my work. It would seem to me that 99 % of all watch repairers and watchmakers prefer loups, but I just don't see the advantage of monovision. Perhaps it is just tradition?
  4. If it's not too much trouble, could you please make an indication on the picture(s) where it is? Just thinking about those members (including myself) who might need to know in the future. Thanks!
  5. From: Jules Borel & Co. Terms and Conditions of Sale "1. PRICES. All prices are subject to change without notice and are subject to Seller’s prices in effect at the time of shipment. All prices are net and exclude any taxes (including, but not limited to, city, county, state, and federal taxes where applicable), transportation, insurance and handling, which are to be borne by Buyer. Buyer shall indemnify, defend and hold Seller and its affiliates, officers, directors, owners and employees harmless from any loss, claim or damage suffered by Seller as a result of Buyer’s failure to pay such sums." The same goes for CousinsUK so tax (20 %) is only paid once.
  6. If you're hobbyist living within the EU, J Borel is essentially and unfortunately not an option as the EU (not the US) punishes anyone and everyone who wants to extend their business beyond the EU. For example, now that the British are leaving the EU (good for them) it will affect Swedish companies negatively as the EU will punish these companies when they do business with Great Britain and prohibit bilateral agreements. In Swedish media, the Brits are portrayed as the villains hurting Swedish business. What a joke! Oh, well, sorry for the rant! I can, first hand, report that it is very expensive to buy from J Borel as long as you're unfortunate to live within the EU, so in most cases I personally do not consider it an option unless it is my only option and perhaps not even then. I live in Sweden (within the EU abomination) and I bought an oscillating weight bearing from them in December 2019. The part itself was $17.53 and shipping (USPS First-Class Mail) $16.55. Add to that, import charges, local VAT, and administrative fees and we're getting close to $50. Just insane if ask me, so that's not something I'll be doing soon again. Anyway, what happens is that once you've placed your order and have registered your PayPal/charge card they will get back to you with an email with an offer for the shipping cost. If you want to go ahead you simply reply to the email stating that you accept the offer. At that point they charge your Paypal/charge card and send you the part(s). Pretty smooth actually, but of course very expensive. And no, you cannot decide the method of shipping yourself.
  7. I would certainly assume that the following is “old news” to the seasoned among you, but if you’re new (or pretty new, like me) to watch repairing, I think and hope you’ll find the following information useful. As most of you know, finding watch movement spare parts can be pretty trying. Oftentimes, they can’t be bought new as they are obsolete or restricted, and as a hobbyist it is even worse. So, one strategy I intend to use in the future will to buy complete movements on flea markets sold as “for parts/repair”. Even so, finding the exact calibre can take a very long time. I had this problem with a Unitas calibre 6380. I needed a new pallet and an escape wheel. When searching eBay all I found were expensive complete watches. Searching the Internet, I came across a page here on WRT which eventually led me to the page “JBorel Products Watch Parts”, and this page felt like a gift from the watch gods. Using this page, once you’ve located the watch movement part you’re looking for you can, with a simple click, get a list of all other calibres (and sometimes even other brands of calibres) using this exact part. That makes it so much easier to find a donor movement or the part itself if it is not listed, for example on eBay, for the calibre you’re working on. For example, let’s say we need a minute wheel for a Unitas calibre 6380 (just follow the red arrows which indicates a click):
  8. Yes, that seems to be the case! The ad has been updated with a description since the last time I had a look. Thanks!
  9. Good to know and thanks for your reply! I think (but except for the experience made by you I'm guessing) that a possible (only) downside would be a shortened battery life? Anyway, if anyone can refute och confirm I'd appreciate the education.
  10. I'm doing my very first quartz watch movement, an ETA 955.112 (my old fathers). ETA's latest technical communication specifies 9014 for the jewel pivot holes. Now, I don't plan to service many quartz watches so I'm a bit reluctant to make the "investment". Just how bad would it be to use for example 9010 instead? I certainly wouldn't want to ruin anything, physically or the time keeping. I also have HP-1300 and thicker oils/lubricants.
  11. No, not as far as I'm aware. If you have an existing jewel with (a known diameter but) an unknown pivot hole diameter I guess the only way would be to drop the jewel on to the pivot and then gently manipulate the jewel with your tweezers to get a feel for the side-shake. Anyway, it's just an idea which I've never tried so I don't know how well (or badly) it would work. Hopefully someone else is more informed or have a better/more correct method for determining the diameter of jewel holes.
  12. You could also measure the pivot diameter using your JKA Feintaster (congrats on having such a fine tool!), but beware that when you get below about 0.12mm there's a real risk of forming flats on the pivot. I guess the safest and most convenient way to find the diameter of the pivot hole is to use a Seitz Jeweled Pivot Gauge (not "sizer") as seen in the below picture. They come up on eBay now and then but are unfortunately often very expensive. If you can get one for around $200 you'll be pretty lucky. I think you might find this thread interesting.
  13. If you don't want to worry about pinging and destroying watch parts (which can happen even when you're seasoned) get yourself some Vostok calibre 2409s to begin tinkering with. Extremely affordable and plenty on eBay, for example these which look pretty intact (but don't take my word for it). You might find my Vostok 2409 Service Walkthrough useful where I also explain why this movement is so special to me. Good luck and see you around!
  14. I'm not an expert, but that is definitely what I would do!
  15. Hi Michael, and welcome! If you don't want to worry about pinging and destroying watch parts (which can happen even when you're seasoned) get yourself some Vostok calibre 2409s to begin tinkering with. Extremely affordable and plenty on eBay, for example these which look pretty intact (but don't take my word for it). You might find my Vostok 2409 Service Walkthrough useful where I also explain why this movement is so special to me. Good luck and see you around!
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