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  1. Valjoux / ETA 7751 Triple calendar moon-phase; This gold-plated Berney-Blondeau S.A. with an ETA 7751 belonged to a German gentleman who received it new on his 60th birthday in 1995. Through the years he kept the original box, the warranty card as well as the 1995 price-list and the dealer’s business card. He has worn the watch only on social accessions and the watch spent most of its time stored in a "Panzerschrank". According to the original price-list, the 1995 purchase price was 1450 CHF. As you can see, the watch held up pretty well, only a few small scratches in the front- and rear mineral-glass crystal and on the top of the lugs some of the gold-plating has worn through. The watch ran, all function did work. It had never been serviced nor opened Disclaimer; This walk-through is written in the way I do it. That's not to say it's the most correct way of doing things but as they say: there are many ways to Rome, all leading to the same result. Neither do I, as a hobbyist, have fancy horological equipment such as a cleaning machine or a "sterile" & "dust-free" room and therefor the end result will not be "Rolex"-standards. All I can say is that I'm always give it my best shot and I will mention problems encountered or were I went wrong, so you don't have to Without any further ado, let's dig into this beautiful & complicated watch ...... First make sure that you downloaded the latest ETA 7751 "Technical Communication". Throughout this walk-through I'll use the same parts reference numbers as used in the "Technical Communication". Below the currently latest September 2021 version; 7751 manual.pdf Before having done anything to the watch, I tested all the functions for proper working and took the timegrapher readings to see if there was anything which needed special attention. These readings can later be compared with the readings after the service. Dial-Up; Dial-Down; Crown-Right; Crown-Down; Crown-Left; Crown-Up; From the readings, it's clear to see that the watch needed a proper service. The back-lid, just like the front-crystals found on pocket-watches, required a knife-type case-opener. Checked out the oscillating weight ball-bearing, it had next to no play and therefor good for another round. Removed the oscillating weight (48). Removed the two casing-screws and clamps, pulled the stem and flipped the case over onto a soft pillow. With the watch-case removed, the winding stem re-inserted and the movement was placed in a proper 7750 (or family) movement-holder. To me, working on these movements a proper movement-holder is paramount. During the disassembly of the movement I encountered some problems and without this holder I most likely would have made scratches or worse..... Pulling the 8x hands; they all came off without any problems. All the hands safely nicely stored in a small plastic container. The same counts for the dial, after the removal directly stored in a plastic container with on both sides of the dial a soft lining. Removal of the Day & Month indicator disk (78) and the Moon phase indicator (79) The keen observer may have noticed that there are no screws next to the movement holder, for example the two screws holding the Day & Month indicator respectively. When working on complicated movements or movements which I'm not familiar with, I took on the habit, when possible, to replace the screws in the same hole as they came from. For sure, it's more work, but some movements do have multiple types/sizes screws and it will become a big puzzle if you store them in the same container / basket. Replacing the screws works (most of the time) very well for me, but in some cases the replaced screws shoulder-out deeper than as they would have done when holding the part above. The protruding screw may touch parts below or when replacing bridges, prevent the bridge from not seating fully "level". To me, replacing the screws thoughtfully is far simpler than facing a huge sorting puzzle later. Removal of the combined maintaining plate (76) and the Month star driving wheel (77). The three tiny screws holding the maintaining plate (76) were extremely tight. I couldn't loosen them with my standard (new) screwdriver bits so I had to grind the screwdriver bit to match the exact the same shape as the screw-grooves. Only then, with "force", they came loose and I was glad for having a proper movement-support! One slip of the screwdriver, with the force that was required, could / would have easily made a deep score in the plate or worse ........ Removal of the Day jumper spring (71), Day & Month jumper (70), Day jumper (72) and the Moon phase yoke (73) plus an early warning ! With those parts out of the way, the Moon phase platform (75) had to come off. Assuming that the with the arrow highlighted screw was one of the screws holding the platform down, I turned the screw only to discover that it was the moon-phase corrector eccentric ....... Oops !! The setting of the eccentric has to be checked at the end anyway, but now I know for sure that it's set wrongly. Removal of the Moon phase jumper (69), Corrector maintaining small plate (66) and the Moon phase jumper spring (67). Still in the picture the Date & Month jumper (74) which should have been removed before this picture was taken. The original stem was replaced by a longer stem to adjust the Calendar driving wheel (61) which was holding the Date-star (63) down. Removal of the Date-star (63, shown in the previous picture) together with the Date-corrector (65) and the corrector maintaining small plate (66). Removal of the calendar platform (62). Slowly back to familiar ground; a standard ETA 7750 starts to appear ... Removal of the Hour wheel 24hrs H1 (59), the Calendar driving wheel (61), the Hour-wheel (60), the Day corrector (58) and the Day corrector spring (57). The removal of the Hammer-spring (56), Set hour-hammer operating lever (53 & 54), Hour counter lock (55), Hour counting wheel (52), Minute-wheel (51) and the free Cannon pinion (50). Pulling of the Driving pinion (49) has to be done carefully; either with a pair of hand-levers or two small screw-drivers. The upwards force on either side of the pinion has to the equal or you may break the pinion of the great wheel (16) (a previous experience has taught me so !! ) Flip the movement over and from here on I'm using a Bergeon 4040 movement holder. First the removal of the Hammer-spring (45). When removing this spring I had up till now difficulties avoiding making a small mark in the Automatic device bridge (44). It was our WRT-member "Nickelsilver" who tipped me off using a piece of Scott tape over the edge of the bridge. This worked very well and for the first time I was able to remove the hammer without leaving a mark! Thanks Nickelsilver! The hammer-spring (45) and the Clutch-spring (47) removed. Remove the Auto device bridge (44). Removal of the Reversing wheel; (43), Reduction wheel (41), the Clutch (40), Oscillating pinion (39), the Hammer (42), Chronograph wheel (37), Minute-counting wheel (38), Minute-counting jumper (46), the Lock (33), the Operating-lever (36) and the Minute counting driving wheel (19). Removal of the Chronograph bridge (34), the Friction spring (32) and the Operating lever spring (35). After the removal of the Ratchet wheel driving wheel (33) it's time to release any residual power in the main-spring. This can be done by holding the crown, lift the Click-spring (20) and slowly release the tension by letting the crown slip through your fingers. Removal of the Chronograph cam (29), Cam jumper (28), Detent (30), Ratchet wheel (23), Crown wheel core (22) and Crown wheel (21). Removal of the Balance Assembly (26+27), Pallet bridge (25) and Pallet fork (24). Removal of the Barrel bridge (18). Removal of the power-train; the Great wheel (16), Third wheel (15), Second wheel (14), Escape wheel (13), the Movement barrel (12) and the Stop lever (17). Flip the movement over for disassembling the keyless works. Removal of the Setting lever jumper (11) together with the Intermediate setting wheel (10), the Time setting gear (9), Rocking bar (8), Yoke (6), Setting lever (5), Winding stem (4), Winding pinion (2), Sliding pinion (3) and the Yoke spring (7). All the parts safely stored in a compartmentalized box with lid, ready for cleaning & demagnetizing. Regarding the "wear & tear" of all the watch-parts; it was clear to see that the watch hadn't seen a lot of use. The Oscillating weight ball-bearing (48) was good, reversing wheel (43) looked good etc. However, I decided to change out the main-spring. This type of barrel has a lid which cannot be "pushed" open. To open the lid, I place a sharp knife in the groove between the barrel and the lid and while pressing down on the knife roll the barrel, in my case on a "soft" leather underground to avoid doing any damage. This widens the groove into a small gap and with the smallest screwdriver one can pry, going around the barrel, the lid off. When done carefully you won't leave any marks. Barrel & Arbor cleaned, braking-grease applied ready for the new spring. Apart from a few (see "technical communication" !) the parts were soaked for 24hrs in Zippo lighter fluid and pegged; all the sprockets, pivots and jewels. Thereafter all the parts were checked for magnetism. Instead of using the unreliable compass method, I'm using an App called "Lepsi" on my iPhone. This App doesn't tell you how much magnetism there is, it only indicates whether there is any. The distance of the object above the screen, by which magnetism is detected, gives you some indication of the strength of the magnetic field, but nothing more. For me, when magnetism is detected, that's enough reason to "Zap" that part on my no-nonsense self-build demagnetizer. Of course, in reality the demagnetizer is not placed anywhere near my iPhone or the other watch-parts / metal-objects like here on the photo. Also, it may be a good idea to take your watch off during the "zapping” operations! Quite a few parts, particularly in the calendar works, were magnetized. With the main-plate anti-shock Chaton cleaned, pegged, cap-stone oiled and re-installed in the main-plate (1), the assembly of the 7751 can begin. Escape wheel (13), Second-wheel (14), Third-wheel (15), Main-spring barrel (12), Great-wheel (16) and Stop-lever (17). Installation of the barrel-bridge (18) (by a 7750 the wheel-train the and barrel-bridge are combined in one bridge). Make sure that all the wheels turn fine before tightening the screws; check, check and double check. Again, if you using the re-installed screws method, some screws may protrude the bridge. (I took the "warning picture" below a little later, so don't look at any additional installed parts) All the Lubrications as per the ETA 7751 "Technical Communication". These two re-installed screws do protrude the Barrel bridge (18). The one on the left will touch the Great-wheel (16) and the one to the right may just touch the main-spring barrel (12). Back them out far enough so they don't cause any trouble. The installation of the Crown-wheel (21), Crown-wheel core (22) and the Ratchet-wheel (23). With the movement turned over, installation of the keyless works; Sliding-pinion (3), Winding pinion (2), Winding-stem (4), Setting-lever (5), Yoke-spring (7), Rocking-bar (8), Yoke (6) and placing of the Time setting gear (9) before placing the Intermediate setting wheel (10) and Setting lever jumper (11) as a "combination". Keyless work completed. Check for proper working! Installed the pallet-fork (24) and the complete balance assembly (26 & 27). Cleaned, pegged the balance Chaton and oiled the cap-stone. Before going any further with the assembling, I tested the power-train and escapement for any irregularities. On the timegrapher the readings were looking a whole lot better than initially. Instead of picturing each position, here are the readings; DU & DD both 292-294 degrees, 0 ms and 0 s/d. CU: 244, 0.1, -14 s/d CR: 249, 0.2, -16 s/d CD: 252, 0.1, -6s/d CL: 262, 0.0, -5 s/d Even though I adjusted the Etachron as good as I could, that's to say centring the hairspring between the two regulator pins and thereafter reducing the regulator pins gap to the point that the hairspring could still, but just "breath", the positional deviation with max. 16 seconds is slightly higher than I was hoping for. Then again, it's not a chronometer grade and each position produced straight lines, so I think that with some daily-rate adjustments the watch will run just fine. Once satisfied with the running of the power-train and the escapement, the assembly of the chronograph can start. Cam jumper (28), Chronograph cam (29), Detent (30), Minute counter driving wheel 30 minutes (19), Lock (33), Operating lever spring (35) and the Operating lever (36). As said; lubrication as per "Technical Communication" and test the proper function of the start/stop and reset levers. Placement of the Ratchet wheel driving wheel (31) and the Friction spring chronograph wheel (32). Install the chronograph bridge (34); don't forget the lubricate the Reversing wheel jewel on the bottom of the chronograph bridge before placement. Also pay attention to the reset-lever, it has to be pushed in so the bridge can sit level & flush. Check the working of the Ratchet driving wheel (31) and the reset lever before tightening the bridge screws. The placement of a well lubricated Reduction wheel (41), Minute counter jumper (46), Oscillation pinion (39, biggest sprocket down), seconds recording Chronograph wheel (37), Minute counting wheel (38), the Clutch (40), make sure that the oscillation pinion pivot is engaged), Reversing wheel (43) and finally the Hammer (42) before the Automatic device bridge (44). Before installing the Automatic device bridge (44), lubricate the jewel for the seconds recording Chronograph wheel underneath the bridge. The installation of the Automatic device bridge can be very tricky. It's very easy to touch the Clutch (40) and the pivot of the Oscillation pinion comes out. Before inserting or tightening the bridge screws, double-check the placing and working of every component!! Once the bridge is installed and with the relevant lubrication done, before mounting the hammer-spring (45) and the Clutch-spring (47), all the functions of the chronograph can be checked & tested; the engagement of the oscillation pinion, the smooth running of the seconds recording chronograph wheel, the advancing of the minute counting wheel, the start/stop- and reset-levers etc. Next is the installment of the Hammer-spring (45) and Clutch-spring (47). To prevent scratches on the Automatic device bridge (44), as per brilliant idea of WRT member "Nickelsilver", a piece of Scotts tape was taped over the edge of the bridge. With the installment of those two springs, the assembly of the chronograph is completed Movement flipped over and placed in the 775x movement holder. Installment of a well lubricated Driving pinion (49), The Cannon-pinion (50), the Minute wheel (51), Hour counting wheel (52), Set hour operating lever (53+54), Hour counter lock (55) the Hammer spring (56), the Day corrector spring (57) and the Day corrector (58). The build-up, up till the Day corrector spring (57) and the Day corrector (58), was identical as to a standard 7750. The Hour wheel 24hrs (59) drops over the Second wheel (14) pivot. Attention: Sadly, no picture but when installing the Hour wheel (60) over the Cannon pinion, one has to lift the Minute wheel (51) slightly and to make sure that the hour wheel teeth do engage in the small minute wheel sprocket. Once they engage, both wheels can be lowered in place. Finally, before installing the Calendar platform (62) the Calendar driving wheel (61) with the "day finger" pointing as shown. From here on I pulled the winding stem to stop the running of the movement and thereby avoiding the advancement / altering of the positions of the wheels. The installation of the Calendar platform (62) can be a bit tricky. It's all too easy to dislodge the hour lever (53) and the Hammer spring (56). Make sure that the platform sits flush with the Main plate (1) before tightening the 3x screws. Place the Day star (63) as shown in both above pictures. Placing of Date + Month jumper (70), the Day + Month jumper (74) (Both jumpers are identical), Day jumper (72), Moon phase yoke (73), Day jumper spring (71), Date corrector (65), Corrector maintaining small plate (66), Moon phase corrector (68), Moon phase jumper (69) and Moon phase jumper spring (67). Installation of the Moon phase platform (75), the Combined maintaining plate (76) (Be aware that the top of the Combined maintaining plate slides in the gap of the Day Star) and the placing of the Month star driving wheel (77). Placing the Month & Day indicator disk (78) and the Moon phase indicator (79). Adjusting the Phase corrector eccentric (64) wasn't that hard as I feared. By adjusting the eccentric one determines the "depth" of the Date corrector (65), shown by the blue arrows. Set too high and the top-sprocket of the Date corrector (65) won't even touch the Moon phase corrector (68). Set too deep the top-sprocket of the Date corrector will jam the Moon phase corrector (68) into the Moon phase indicator. The "depth" has to set such that the sprocket of the Date corrector (65) pushes the Moon phase corrector (68) just far enough so that it will just advance the Moon phase indicator by one click before the top Date corrector (65) sprocket releases the Moon phase corrector (68). There is clear information about the Moon phase corrector "depth" setting in the ETA 7751 "Technical Communication". With all parts installed and tested as far as possible, the dial goes back on. Before re-installing the hands, I re-lumed the minute & hour hand with new high-class LumiNova. Both hands now re-lumed and drying before the installation. Placing the long Date indicator hand required a bigger size hand-pusher which I didn't have. The idea was born to cut a tweezer protector-cap from the top until the required size was obtained. Stuck to protector cap onto the handle of a diamond file for more stability / pushing-power. It worked like a treat Turn the date quick-set until the month indicator disk changes month, that will be the first (1) day of the new month. The rest of the hands (8! in total) to be set at 24:00 midnight when the day indicator disk changes. Detailed instructions about the "shift tolerances" are described in the ETA 7751 "Technical Communication". All the hands installed and correctly set on the month / day / date and moon phase. The 18th of January 2022 had a full moon. The German gentleman received the watch when he turned 60 in 1995, now I'll continue with his watch as from my (65th ) birthday in January 2022 I'm still awaiting new crystals and once the case has been restored, I'll add the final picture of the fully restored/serviced watch. I really enjoyed working on this watch and even though I sometimes feel that contributing to this current WRT-forum has sadly become a bit of wasted time, I do hope that my write-up, perhaps found via Google or some other search machine, will be of some use to somebody, at some point in time Endeavor, Denmark
    15 points
  2. In the "THAT NEVER HAPPENS!!!" category of watch repair, I have this new story to add: I picked up this old, dirty Helbros Invincible at a flea market because I liked the style and wanted to see if I could do anything with it. I got it home and took off the back...and it was like opening Pandora's box! Looking over the Helbros-branded Lorsa P72 movement, I could plainly tell that someone had been allowing a stray screw or metal component to just freely go romping about amongst the wheel train. Damaged wheel teeth, scratches, broken staff, messed up hairspring, a couple cracked jewels, but no sign of a loose screw or part - although!...there were two empty screw holes, one in a bridge and it was missing one of the dial foot screws. So I picked up another Lorsa P72 movement off Ebay that seemed to have everything I'd need (it had rust on the parts near the stem hole, but I was not worried about that). When the donor movement came, I just cleaned everything and rebuilt choosing the best parts of each. Ended up replacing the balance complete, center wheel, third wheel, two jewels, and the missing screws. Miraculously, the other wheels were undamaged; teeth, leaves, and pivots were fine. Once assembled and oiled, I set the stud carrier as close to where it should be as I could get it, and put the regulator dead center. Now, I only have a timegraphing app on my phone (limited funds you know). But the traces looked really good. So I've been wearing it off and on, and keeping it wound. Here's the dumb luck part - I haven't needed to regulate this thing yet! It's been two days, a shade over 48 hours, and it is now about 3 seconds faster over that time period. I need to read the specs on a Lorsa P72, to see if it can do any better but, so far, a gain of only 3 seconds over a 48 hour period doesn't sound terrible. I'm used to antique pocket watches and their eccentricities, so having a watch run this close to dead-on without having to regulate it six ways to Sunday feels a lot like a miracle to me. I'm starting to really adore this wrist watch.
    13 points
  3. Thought I’d show off a watch project that I have been working on. Wanted to create vintage inspired watches. Tell me what you think so far!
    12 points
  4. It is my impression that ETA's calibre 2892-A2 is usually found in more expensive watches and in luxury watches where oftentimes the movement has been modified. Mechanically, I don't think the 2892-A2 is superior to ETA’s classic 2824-2. Both movements have the same diameter (11 ½´´´ Ø 25.60 mm), the same frequency (28’800 A/h), and the same date complication. The decisive difference is the thickness where the 2892-A2 is one-millimetre thinner (3.6mm). That, combined with being a reliable and well-functioning movement, has made it popular for additional complications and alterations such as moon phase, power reserve display, co-axial escapement, chronograph modules from Dubois Depraz, and so on. The Swiss Sellita Calibre SW300-1 is, as far as I understand, an excellent clone of the 2892-A2. There is also a Chinese clone, the Seagull Calibre ST1812 (reviewed by @Markin the video “Chinese eta 2892-A2 Clone - Service and Review - Seagull ST1812”), and possibly others. Mark has made a playlist of videos that excellently demonstrate how to service the ETA 2892-A2 movement. The playlist is named: "Omega 2500 Co-Axial Stripdown and Service (ETA 2892-A2)" I recommend Mark’s playlist for several reasons. Among other things, he shows how to mount the barrel bridge safely and how to hold the minute train bridge with your tweezers to easily get it into place on the main plate (which I found a bit fiddly). In addition, he shows and compares the parts that are all too easy to mix up. One thing that is not shown in Mark's service video is that the Incabloc setting (chaton and cap jewel) for the balance and the main plate have different diameters. The main plate Incabloc setting diameter is smaller than that of the balance. The reason this is not shown in the video is probably that Mark removes, cleans, and lubricates the Incabloc settings one at a time after he reassembles the balance, so he wouldn’t notice. Anyway, don't mix up the two sets! Something that I appreciate about Mark's videos in general and that sets him apart from basically all other watch repairers on YouTube is that he doesn't continuously babble in his videos but mainly talks to make clarifications. I enjoy those segments of silence where I can just focus on the work being done. When I started my service, I decided to follow Mark's disassembly which worked perfectly. But for the assembly, I made up my mind to follow ETA's technical documentation to the letter. It turned out to be a mistake. In ETA's documentation, the assembly of the movement begins with the keyless works, then the train of wheels and then the barrel bridge. The crucial problem with this arrangement is that it is physically impossible to mount the barrel bridge if the train of wheels is already mounted. It is also very fiddly and difficult to baste the end of the winding stem into the winding pinion hole because the hole for the winding stem in the main plate is both open and tapered and therefore does not hold the winding stem. Mark takes a considerably more hands-on approach. He begins the assembly with the barrel bridge. He then mounts the keyless works whose constituent parts (the winding stem, the winding pinion, and the sliding pinion) are supported by the underside of the barrel bridge, making it considerably easier to get the keyless works in place. After I revised my strategy, this service walkthrough now follows Mark’s approach. It surprises me, but it seems like no watchmaker has proofread ETA's technical documentation. Alternatively, ETA follows an established practice and expects those using the documentation to understand that the assembly order in the document is not significant. I am also somewhat sceptical of ETA's recommendations regarding lubrication. Where we traditionally use grease, for example in the keyless works, ETA chooses mainly oil (HP-1300). I guess that ETA treats all parts of the movement with epilame (Fixodrop) and that oil may then be a better alternative. For better or for worse, my service walkthrough follows ETA's lubrication recommendations. As usual, I would like to remind those of you with no previous experience in watch servicing that this service walkthrough should not be seen as a tutorial on how to service a watch movement. A lot of tools, consumables, training and know-how are required to succeed. Fortunately, there are several excellent resources and watchmaking schools online. When looking through the pictures you’ll see that a few screws and plates are either marred or have pits and grooves in them. None of this is my doing but is either the result of rust (that I removed) or the doings of a less scrupulous repairer than myself. Finally, someone may ask, “Why to bother to do a service walkthrough with pictures when there is such an excellent video?" The main answer to the question is that I find it interesting and fun, and I see it as a complement to Mark's service video. Using this walkthrough, you can quickly scroll through the pictures to read what the different parts are called and where and in what order they should go, what the screws to be used look like, and to read ETA's lubrication recommendations. So, I hope you’ll find this ETA 2892-A2 service walkthrough useful, now or in the future. *** ETA Calibre 2892-A2 Disassembly *** ' *** ETA Calibre 2892-A2 Assembly ***
    11 points
  5. Introduction This service walkthrough is not a tutorial on how to service a watch movement. I made it for myself because I think it's fun and because it will make it easier the next time I service a Vostok 2431. I also think it feels nice to be able to share this walkthrough considering all the valuable information that many very talented members on WRT freely share. Many, many thanks! There is a lot to learn when servicing a watch movement that is not covered in this walkthrough. Therefore, I recommend, for example, watchfix.com, learnwatchmaking.com, or timezonewatchschool.com. I feel like I got the most bang for my buck at watchfix.com (I'm not sponsored in any way) but I've also had a lot of fun and benefited from the other online schools. Links to photos on my OneDrive Vostok calibre 2431 disassembly walkthrough. Please sort the images by name in ascending order. Vostok calibre 2431 assembly walkthrough. Please sort the images by name in ascending order. Curiosities I think it was in 2014 or possibly 2015 that I bought my Sturmanskie Open Space. I had just discovered that there were watches where the hour hand only rotates one revolution per day and at that time I knew absolutely nothing about watch movements, service and repair. The idea that the hour hand of a watch only rotates one revolution per day seemed not only completely logical but also different and fascinating. The earth rotates one revolution around its axis per day, so it should be obvious that the hour hands of our watches do so too. The fact that the letters on the watch were also Cyrillic did not make the whole thing any less exciting. I just couldn’t resist it and I’m happy I didn’t! Vostok claims that their movements only need a service every 10 years, and I think that's true because the tolerances are pretty rough and therefore large amounts of dirt are needed to stop a Russian movement or even cause it to run badly. It has been said that the amount of dirt required to stop a Vostok movement is enough to stop a hundred Patek Philippe movements However, the price for this endurance is a movement that doesn't come close to the precision offered by high-quality Swiss and Japanese movements, but it's still quite easy to get these Russian movements to run accurately as long as they're worn and used consistently. About the movement Russian watch brands such as Vostok, Raketa, and Poljot, to name a few, are known for using their in-house movements, but not this Sturmanskie which is instead powered by a Vostok calibre 2431, which is a 24-hour movement. However, it is not a true 24-hour movement. That is, the movement is not originally designed as a 24-hour movement. Instead, Vostok has modified the movement in its calibre 2416B so that the hour hand only rotates one revolution per day. Calibre 2431 is otherwise identical to Vostok automatic calibres 2416B and 2415. The motion work(/dial train) in Vostok 2431 The way that Vostok modified the movement so that the hour hand only rotates one revolution per day is by modifying a) the minute wheel, b) the bearing for the minute wheel in the main plate, and c), adding an intermediate date indicator wheel. The minute wheel has been modified so that it has two pinions that lie on top of each other. The lower pinion drives what I call the first intermediate date indicator wheel while the upper pinion drives the hour wheel and has been adjusted so that the hour wheel only rotates one revolution per day. The number of teeth on the hour wheel itself may have also been adapted, but this is not something that I have investigated. Normally the minute wheel is mounted on a regular metal post on the main plate, but in this case, Vostok has replaced the post with a beefy, jewelled bearing. I assume that this has been necessary to get the minute wheel, with its two pinions on top of each other, to rotate sufficiently smoothly and stably. The added first intermediate date indicator wheel drives the second intermediate date indicator wheel which is part of Vostok's regular (non-modified) calendar complication. And this is what it looks like with the hour wheel mounted. Cleaning I have found that it is all too easy to underestimate the importance of cleanliness when servicing a movement, perhaps because the parts are microscopic and therefore it takes time to get used to thinking microscopically, even though I have been doing this now for five years. Cleaning of pinions and pivots A type of watch movement part that is particularly important but also difficult to get completely clean is pinions, but @nickelsilver advised me quite recently that in its pre-cleaning you can dip and rub the pinions in pith wood that you have impregnated with an effective degreasing agent, for example, Horosolv. I've done it several times now and it works amazingly well. Speaking of pinions, independent American watchmaker Josh Shapiro mentioned in a podcast that he considered pinions to be the most difficult part of a watch movement to make perfectly. Whether it's true or not I don't know but I think it's likely. To get the pivots clinically clean, I have also started using EVEFLEX, but you have to be careful because the material has an abrasive effect. It is important to choose the right polisher and to be careful. I have summarized my experiences with EVEFLEX in this post and I mention it because EVEFLEX is easy and quick to work with and gives me very good results. End-shake If there's one thing I've learned this time around, it is that a Russian movement cannot be converted to a Swiss movement because the tolerances in Russian movements are generally much coarser. Experimentally, I adjusted the end-shake to 2/100mm on everything from the pallet fork to the centre wheel, with the result that the amplitude and rate became extremely erratic. I created a thread about this: "Can end-shake and or side-shake ever be too small?" As you will see if you follow the thread, once again @nickelsilver, @Shane, and @JohnR725came to my rescue. Many thanks! My recommendation is to let the end-shake be slightly wider on Russian movements. After I increased the end-shake to approx. 4/100 mm, the amplitude and rate returned to typical, i.e., still somewhat irregular but perfectly normal for a Russian movement. Side-shake In this video, Kalle Slaap from Chronoglide shows an amazingly simple and effective way to determine if the side shake is correct. Since there was a crack in the third wheel jewel in the train wheel bridge, I replaced it, and when I then used Kalle Slaap's method, I could clearly see the 3rd wheel pivot jumping back and forth in the jewel hole. So, I replaced the jewel with a hole that was 1/100mm smaller and the visual difference, just changing it by 1/100 mm, was nothing less than dramatic. I am incredibly happy that I got to learn this simple and exceptionally clear method. Many thanks to Kalle Slaap at Chronoglide! Vostok reverser wheels If you Google “Vostok reverser wheels”, there is a lot of whining going on. I don't think there are any major problems with Vostok's reverser wheels, but they are unfortunately easy to damage during service or modification of the movement, and I think that is the real reason for the whining. Next to Seiko watches, Vostok watches are immensely popular to modify in terms of dials and hands, and in addition, many people want to fix the seconds hand that sometimes stutters on these movements. The latter is done by bending the second-hand pinion spring illustrated in this thread. To make these modifications, the oscillating weight/rotor must be removed and when it is to be screwed back on, it is easy for the rotor pinion to end up on top of the teeth of the reverser wheels. If you tighten the rotor screw in that position, even just a little, the reverser wheels will inevitably be damaged. The result is that the automatic winding stops working or only works intermittently. An easy way to check if the reverser wheels are working as they should is to manually rotate the oscillating weight alternately about 20 degrees in both directions with a piece of peg wood while looking at the 1st reduction wheel which is large and easy to see. If the 1st reduction wheel continuously rotates in the same direction (counterclockwise, if I remember correctly), no matter which way you rotate the oscillating weight, you can be sure that the reverser wheels are working as they should. If, on the other hand, the 1st reduction wheel rotates alternately in both directions when you rotate the oscillating weight alternately, then you can be sure that the reverser wheels are damaged and need to be replaced. Servicing the automatic mainspring I find it difficult to service the mainspring on automatic movements. It is, in my opinion, a construction that leaves room for improvement and that is why I generally prefer manually wound movements. If the mainspring in an automatic movement slips too soon, it reduces the amplitude and the power reserve, and if the mainspring slips too late, there is the risk of re-banking and that the movement runs much too fast when you are physically active, especially when you take a brisk walk swinging your arms, and the oscillating weight rotates constantly. The effect is like continuously turning the crown of a manual movement with high pressure when the mainspring is already fully wound. Not good! What I learned this time anyway, long story short is that you can be quite generous with braking grease on the rim on the inside of the mainspring barrel. Even if some of the braking grease ends up where it really shouldn't be, I don't think it will destroy or affect anything negatively. Also, and again from Kalle Slaap at Chronoglide, I learned that you should press at the end of the spring at the bridle when it is mounted in a spacer, and you are about to push it into the mainspring barrel. In this way, the rest of the spring automatically follows down into the mainspring barrel. You can see it in this clip. Very smooth, especially in combination with my highly rated Master Craft mainspring winder which I wrote about in this post. Lubrication of cap jewels For a long time, I have had trouble getting the oil to stay in the centre of the cap jewels and not flow out after I oiled them and installed them, despite treating them with epilame (Fixodrop). I think it's because (and now I'm going by gut feeling) that I previously always installed the shock assembly in the main plate before installing the balance and that I didn't treat the jewel housing (chaton) with epilame. After several failures in servicing this movement, I decided to treat both the cap jewels and jewel housings with epilame and mount the shock assembly after having replaced the balance. It did the trick and also made fitting the three-legged anti-shock spring much easier. My theory is that the balance staff pivots stabilize the oil in the centre of the cap jewels when the jewel housing (chaton) is dropped into place, and better hold the jewel housing in place, which will otherwise slide around while installing the three-legged anti-shock springs. Have I just written the longest post in the history of WRT? Anyway, hope you enjoyed it!
    11 points
  6. 1970 Seiko 5606-7000 with hand made stamp dial. Running at 0 SPD and amplitude over 300 degrees at full wind.
    11 points
  7. The local chapter of NAWCC jointly with CAWCG (affiliate of AWCI) held a class on staking and jeweling today...just 30 minutes away! It was great. I had never used my Seitz jeweling tool for anything other than tightening a cannon pinion. It was fun...and a new vista!! Great bunch of guys too.
    10 points
  8. I found this article interesting and inspiring and thought I'd share it. https://www.reasonforbeing.com.au/home/northeast-ya8rg-fbxmh-6st9k-5ylyf
    10 points
  9. I use the term "restoration" lightly. I did a full service, cleaned the case in an ultrasonic, and replaced the crystal. When I got the watch, it wasn't running, and now it is, so I'll take what I can get.
    10 points
  10. This Master Craft Mainspring Winder has been recommended and praised several times by @clockboy and I’m so happy that I, after several years of trying to acquire one, finally found a copy in very good condition on eBay. The Master Craft mainspring winder is surprisingly easy and convenient to use, and of the mainspring winder variants that I have tried so far, K&D 128, and Bergeon style winders, I must say that the Master Craft winder is the one that I now prefer with a good margin. Maybe a bit exaggerated, but I always dread and feel tense using my other mainspring winders, especially the K&D 128, but with the Master Craft I feel perfectly confident every time. It’s simply a joy to use and handle! There are several things with the Master Craft mainspring winder that I especially appreciate: The transparent discs of the winding arbors that make it so much easier to understand what is going on with the mainspring, both when you crank it in and especially when it’s to be detached from the winding arbor. The gauges that make it superfluous to measure the inside of the mainspring barrel. Instead, you can just try out which gauge best fits in the mainspring barrel and that’s it. That the mainspring can be transferred into the mainspring barrel from either side of the transfer plate to provide for right- or left-hand coiling. A nice feature too is that these transfer plates are coin edged making them easy to attach and detach from the holder. That the mainspring is so easy to crank into the transfer plate as the contact area between the mainspring and the transfer plate is so small. It almost feels as if the spring has lost 50 % of its tension. It also makes it quite easy to pull out the mainspring a bit from the transfer plate if you happen to crank it too far to get the bridle in. That it’s so easy to get the hook on the winding arbor to attach to the hole/eye in the inner coil of the mainspring. Using the suggested "method 1" in the user manual, I just push the winding arbor down in the inner coil of the mainspring while I crank it and the arbor hook automatically finds its way into the hole/eye in the mainspring. Conclusively, I must say that I’m super happy with this cleverly devised mainspring winder. It exceeded all that I was hoping for and was expecting! So much that I felt an obligation to write this post.
    10 points
  11. I'm a longtime member of another forum (non-watch related), and personally know several of the members. I have posted up some of my recent watch projects as a several of the people there have told me that they enjoy seeing that kind of work being done. One of the members (whom I haven't met previously) sent me a private message telling me that he had his grandfather's old watchmaking tools and asked me if I'd be interested in purchasing them. We started to talk and he sent me a few photos, which got me excited! He then proceeded to tell me that his grandfather was the official clock and watch repairer for Queen Juliana of Holland. He sent me a photo of a newspaper article his family has kept from the Tulsa World newspaper back from the 1970's, stating that his grandfather was one of the best watchmakers in Holland. After he repaired a special clock for Queen Juliana that was given to her as a gift from Prime Minister David Ben-Gurion of Israel, she was so pleased with his work that the queen became one of his clients! The story goes on to give a history on his grandfather, and was very interesting to read. I tried to upload a high quality photo of the newspaper article, so you can zoom in and read it if you'd like to. He told me that his family has kept his grandfathers tools since he passed away many years ago. They never had any intent of selling them, but after he read that I was getting started learning watchmaking and knew that I was local. They decided to offer them to me for sale with the strict provision that I do not sell any of them, but rather use his grandfathers tools as I continue to learn watchmaking. I was happy to agree to his terms. I finally got home this evening after meeting him on the other side of the state and began going through all of the items. There is a complete staking set with every single piece still in the box, all of which are in fantastic condition, a Jacot tool, a lathe, several sets of broaches and files, bags upon bags of parts, a poising tool, and some other tools that I honestly don't even know what they do at this point. I explained to him that some of the tools were beyond my current skill level. We both smiled when I said that because the whole idea was for me to use them to learn as I continue to move forward. Here are some photos: This last photo is of a few tools that I haven't yet figured out what they for. The bottom/middle tool I thought perhaps was what you use to hold hands if you need to use a broach to open up the eyelets, but it does not separate to allow you to install the hands, and the holes are quite large. I'm unsure what any of them do quite honestly. I think I got a really good deal. I purchased all of these items for a total of $600. I know the staking set is probably worth nearly that by itself. I'll need to find a motor to use for the lathe, but I'd imagine it'll be some time before I get to a point where I can use it. I have an immediate need for the staking set and Jacot tool, so I'm going to find some fishing line and restring the bow so I can spin the tool. If anyone can provide any insight on what the 4 tools are in the last photograph, I'd be very appreciative. I'm pretty excited to use these tools, and am extremely grateful that his family thought me worthy to continue on using his grandfather's tools. Hopefully I made a good investment!
    9 points
  12. Inspired by the Mastercraft winder I tried to use its principle for a „quick and dirty“ mainspring winder. The spring I used for testing has an arbor diameter of 2,2mm (left wound) and the barrel has an ID of 8mm. The mainspring has a hight of 1,2mm. So I found a washer with the right thickness of 1,2mm, drilled it to 7,5mm ID and cut a slot in with my dremel. Then the washer was fixed to a board with three tiny drops of super glue. I used the original lid and arbor and my pin vice to complete the tool. The rest is selfexplaining looking at the pics. Any thoughts?
    9 points
  13. 10 month in Hello again to all. Just an update on progress of a beginner. And a few observations. I began in December 2021. My wife has 3 old pocket watches. That are dead. “I know!” I said to myself. “I’ll fix them”. I’ll look up on the Internet, and it will show me what do do. I’ll buy one of those watch sets and Bob’s your uncle (English saying). All will be well. The set arrived. I pulled the watches apart. What am I looking at? Don’t know. What do I do? Don’t know. How do I do it? Don’t know. Some Internet sites are doing repairs. I’ll buy a cheap watch that I can repair. Did so. I was not running. Now I have 12 watches and movement. None working. What goes where.? My weekly spends of £10 was going every week and nothing to show. Nothing was ever fixed. What am I looking at? Don’t know. What do I do? Don’t know. How do I do it? Don’t know. Looking on the Internet I found YouTube. There is a plethora of sites where people show you what do. Not! In actual fact there a very few who are into showing their skills at the teaching level. Less that 2 dozen. That’s not many. All bar two are amateurs. There are many who show off. “I started last week, and this is how I have worked on a Chronograph, and it is now pristine”. Wow! I can learn from him. Not. But as you begin to understand you realise why you can’t. Their skill level they portray is way beyond even my level after 10 months. The ability to use tweezers correctly to remove and turn jewels over for cleaning for example. What did I do right. Well, I can say in my favour, I typed the words ‘watch forums’. I found ‘Watch Repair Talk’, and information about Mark Lovick. Wow! Cant afford that. Look elsewhere, Buy a cheap course. Did so. The video was made in 1987 and was converted from a 16mm Cine camera and it was about pocket watches. They did give me a refund. It took me over 3 months to save and buy Marks course. Should have done it in the first week. What he offered me was information and guidance. Learn the principles. Practice. Repeat, repeat, repeat. It won’t work first time. Redo. Practice. Where am I now. What would I do differently. In actual fact. Not much. Working my way forward has given me hours of pleasure. I subscribe to 22 YouTubers and eagerly open each. They are great to learn from. I spend almost the same time practising. Can I disassemble safely? Yes. Very rarely screwdriver slip or ‘ping’. Can I clean? Yes. Hand clean then Ultrasonic to degrease and wash twice. Can I assemble? Oh yes. Do they work? Yes.. ish. Need to practice to overcome low amplitude. Am I getting there. Oh yes. One of the things that I have been told by a number of people is quite correct, but as beginner it is totally impracticable to practice. Don’t start on movements, or dead watches. Trying to find the parts for movements means that you have to buy another movement, or more than one because the donor is just as bad. The dead watch is just as bad. Why is is bad? Because it is broken and needs a part. Buy a movement for the part. Back to square one. In hind site, it is the correct thing to do. But where would I now be? Most running watches are in excess of my months saving. I would never have started. But I have. And I have to say it is great fun. What information would I have helped me? None really, as this is voyage of discovery and you can only discover by error – practice. The best thing I have learned is, system. Have every tool in its place. Put everything away each time. Have a label on each box that contains the watches and note on it details what you have done or need. Where will I go from here? Deeper into the hobby. I’ve given myself two years to learn enough to service my own very expensive watch. I bought it in 1968 for my 18th birthday. Regards to all. Ross
    9 points
  14. There are many years of thread posts in this "General" sub-forum. In an attempt to better organize and categorize these threads I have created a number of sub-forums within the main category of "Watch Repair Discussions, Help & Advice" over time (a long time as it's a painful job), many of the posts within this General sub-forum will be moved to a more appropriate sub-forum depending on the subject. Please help by taking a quick look at the sub-forum titles and post in the appropriate section and as a last resort, if you do not find an appropriate sub-forum for your subject then you may post here. Thank you for your co-operation
    9 points
  15. Thanks for the tips everyone. I went with the feeler gauge option as it was to hand. Rather than risking the temper I used a mini angle grinder (plus constant cooling) to cut a rough blank, then carbide drills and diamond files to drill and shape the part. I tried scribing the shape on to the part but eventually having scribed a copy as a template I glued it to the blank and worked on that: I changed the design of the detent spring slightly as the original obviously had a stress riser at its root. I couldn't match the exact shape of the detents but their positions are identical to the original. Time to check for functionality and fit: I bent the spring slightly (about 0.3mm at the tip) down towards the setting lever. It functions perfectly and feels smooth with a distinct click from one detent to the other, so I'll polish it ready to fit to the watch when it is cleaned: Thinking of stress riders I polished the cut edges of the spring with metal polish on the tip of a toothpick . It will be interesting to see if it lasts.
    9 points
  16. Disassembly sequence here (Please sort by name in ascending order) Assembly sequence here (Please sort by name in ascending order) The watch is an Enicar Star Jewels Ocean Pearl from the 1970s A bit of background I bought this watch on tradera.com (Swedish eBay) listed in the category "Klockor/Renoveringsobjekt" ("Watches / Renovation items"). It was listed as "working" despite lacking the winding stem. I bought it for three reasons. I wanted to try my hands on an inexpensive watch in visual need of renovation. I was curious of the Enicar brand and their in-house movements, and I thought the blue dial with its applied indices had potential. It was clear that the watch needed a new winding stem, crown, and armoured crystal. I found an original stem on eBay from Spain for less than €10 including shipping (a bit of a bargain I think). I bought a bunch of inexpensive waterproof crowns from CousinsUK.com so that I could select the most comfortable and at least somewhat nice looking. I also bought a couple of inexpensive Sternkreutz armoured glasses from CousinsUK.com Overall the movement looked pretty OK except for a third wheel pivot that was rusty. Removing the rust (using vinegar essence) the pivot became Coca Cola bottle shaped so I burnished it and in the process had to remove approx. 2 to 3/100 mm. This in turn created too much side-shake so I replaced the jewel as well. The mainspring looked pretty OK too so I kept it. The cannon pinion also needed a bit of tightening. I guess the friction between the centre wheel arbor and the cannon pinion really can't last forever when a watch is being used for many, many years, perhaps even for decades (looking at the case back of this watch it has seen massive use). Anyway, to tighten the cannon pinion I first tried with my Seitz jewelling pusher and stake for lanterning cannon pinions, but it feels like the edges of the pusher and stake are somehow too blunt or perhaps not designed for wrist watch movements?! So, I resorted to my cannon pinion tightening tool (Bergeon 4733) which is really a bit scary to use but works very well once you've destroyed your first two or three cannon pinions learning how to use it. The trick is not to alter the position of the screw (unscrew it) once it reaches the inside of the handle. As soon as the screw touches the inside of the handle it's time to press. That will usually tighten the cannon pinion the required 1-3/100 mm (I would guess). To give back some of the luster to the dial and hands I simply used a Dial & Hand Cleaning Pen from CousinsUK.com. It worked better than I had expected. The old lume was partly missing and what was left was completely crusty so I simply scratched the remains off and didn't bother to replace it (the blue colour shining through the hands looked pretty great and I don't care much for lume anyway) Despite throwing everything in my arsenal of collected knowledge and experience on the this watch I couldn't get it to run perfectly. The amplitude (as well as the rate) in the horizontal positions fluctuates between 260 and 280 degrees but mostly stays around 260 degrees. I did adjust the curb pin as the hairspring was pinched between the boot and the curb pin and made sure it bounced evenly between the two, but the effect was only marginal. I suspect that the hairspring touches the lower part of the boot. Anyway, I decided to wait with further investigations, put it together, wear it and enjoy it. Despite this shortcoming it performs very well as a daily wearer, only varying in rate between about +1 and -1 seconds per day.
    9 points
  17. Hello fellow watch repairers, a few days before christmas I scrolled through a website for used stuff and came across an unbelievable offer for a vintage JLC Memovox for just under 1000€. It said that the dial was restored but for this price I just couldn’t say no to it, although I feared that it might be a scam. So on the twenty-third of December I drove four hours to pick it up, still with the feeling that it is to good to be true. But everything worked out well and I bought the watch what makes me the proud owner of my first JLC: And with a new strap it was a really lovely piece: At first everything worked well but after a few days the alarm wasn’t functioning anymore. Diagnosis: broken alarm mainspring. So I had to replace it and give the whole movement a service. The movement itself seemed to be in good condition and marks in the caseback showed that it was at least serviced a couple of times during its lifetime: Here a some impressions from the stripdown: And indeed the alarm mainspring was broken: I cleaned all the parts, replaced the spring and reassembled it. Now the alarm works flawlessly again, it is running nicely and is ready for its next life chapter. I never worked on such a valuable and complicated watch, so I‘m really happy that everything went well and that the watch is working again. I hope you enjoyed this short report!
    9 points
  18. I picked this up on my trip to MN for my canoe trip. As noted in another thread, I also picked up some cleaning machines. This cabinet is full of crystals, all neatly organized. I was shocked with excitement to see that none of the inserts were missing. This is pretty unusual for something that is probably 60 years old. I will never use all of these crystals, but they are there...just in case! I also got a gillion class pocket watch crystals, and post about them at a later time.
    8 points
  19. I worked through this refinishing issue and decided to post my solution for forum readers who may end up in this situation. During a routine watch service, I noticed a little surface oxidation on a pocket watch spring. It wasn't a lot, so I tried removing with a glass fiber brush. That removed some of the rust, not all, so I decided to go further. Then after some light work on a coarse diamond plate, the rust was gone, but it left a reflective, polished looked instead of the dull finish originally that all the other steel parts under the dial had. The two pictures below show how the spring looked after rust removal next to a part (yoke) with finish I was trying to match. It looked almost passable from one angle but from another (direct on top) not very close. I hadn't come across the situation before. Typically when I refinish steel it is to mirror finish. Never tried to match a dull or grey finish. First guess was that it would naturally dull over time and I shouldn't bother but after some thought I came to the opposite conclusion. I did a test to see if I could dull the metal to at least get something with less luster. Having some experince removing rust from old tools with vinegar, I knew that it changes the appearance- usually darkening steel. I decided to try it so placed the part in white vinegar. Perhaps a short soak would dull but not darken the metal? A few minutes gave the grey that I was looking for. The after photo is below. Looks pretty darn close to my eyes.
    8 points
  20. I actually did this a few days ago to put my 1st acrylic dome in. I have one of the cheap lever style chinese presses. I sanded down some scrap wood, put an M6 nut into the back and just used some super glue to hold it in. I put a small piece of foam over the dome when pushing on the crystal. Without the foam, I broke a crystal, but I chalked that up to also being too large and being the 1st time I have tried this, was using way too much pressure to make the larger size fit. The smaller size down is the one that ended up fitting.
    8 points
  21. I've taken possession of an Eterna wristwatch belonging to a family member, in need of a service. It's in a sorry state externally. It barely runs and has terrible variation in between positions. It has been serviced in the past. There are four servicing marks in the case back and scratches on all of the bridges. It definitely requires deep cleaning. On examination, I found two significant challenges requiring attention, which are damage to the barrel bridge and the setting lever spring. Spares are no readily available for this movement and donors rarely come on the market. Plus it's time for me to move on from fault finding and parts replacement on to greater challenges. 1: The mainspring barrel bridge pivot hole is ovalised. The barrel arbor is no longer orthogonal to the plate and bridge. There is obvious wear to the upper side of the bridge from the ratchet wheel. I've resolved this issue by fitting a bushing to the bridge. I practiced the technique, refining each time on a couple of old citizen movements before working on the eterna: Having mounted the movement on a wax chuck I centred it on the lower barrel pivot using a wiggle stick, ensuring the movement was fully flat on the chuck: I then fitted the barrel bridge, and bored it out to about 2.7mm to regain the centring. I then bored the hole to 2.99mm using a seitz reamer. Following Perplexr's instructions on youtube, adapted to the tools I have available I turned a brass bushing 3.00mm in diameter and 0.44mm in thickness, pressed it in to place and broached it to size ready for a test fitting. If the fit is good I'l deburr it and re-plate the bridge. Happily the barrel now sits square, rotates freely without side play and with correct end play I then finished the bore with a burnishing broach, deburred and replated the bridge. Regrettably I scratched the surface of the bridge when boring the hole. You can see the scratch running up from the chamfered circle where the bushing meets the original material of the bridge. Oh well, it's only one more of many. It niggles me as I managed not to to do this on the practice pieces. Part 2 of the challenge (the setting lever spring) is rather daunting and I'm struggling to find the materials. I'll post it as a question in the other forum.
    8 points
  22. Well, here’s my first custom movement holder, pretty happy with it, in fact I wish I would have made this before I started on this movement, I’ll almost done with it. I ordered the 4040 anyway, but figured I try making one in the mean time. thanks for all the help guys!
    8 points
  23. I don't get to post here very often. But I picked up an interesting specimen at a local flea market: a TruTime talking atomic watch - for a dollar. The vendor didn't know much about, except that he didn't know how to make it work. To be honest, neither did I at that moment, but I intended to give it a shot. I figured if I failed it would still be a cheap lesson. I happened to have a 2032 battery for it, still very fresh. As a precaution I cleaned the contacts and blew it out a bit. Put a touch of quartz oil at the very few pivots it had, and it just sat there at first. So I went online to search for the setup instructions. With their aid, I got it set and running. Now what? I don't need a talking watch. And I don't want to just sell it. My oldest daughter has a friend who is legally blind, and her sight is degenerating. So I'm giving it to her. Best use I could think of for it. I have to find the link to have a braille copy of the instructions sent out.
    8 points
  24. I finally had time and the spares to fix my Tudor project. It is the first watch I have ever done that had major work needed. I would like to thank everyone on this forum for their dedicated posts I scrolled through many to update my knowledge for this one. From using vinigar to desolve the broken stem from the crown to the scary KIF springs that where very intimidating to me as I had never seen these before. This one has been rebuild without even dropping one screw as I took on Nickelsilvers tweezers advice.
    8 points
  25. Someone had tried on a large Sector watch at the jeweler shop. Only later the owner found that the person managed (how?!?) to snap the stem in the little time he handled it, but didn't say anything. The crown is signed and of a peculiar look, of course Sector service center said that it's not available anymore. Then, somehow I botched on the correct way of removing a stem broken flush on the crown, that is to cut around the top of the female threaded section about 1mm to grab it. The sliding portion left for good and the fixed one was ruined. Time to think something different, all in all it took about two years until yesterday. All work was done an a non-watchmakers baby lathe with standard tools. An extremely useful one is the carburetor jets gauges below. These are now discontinued or sell for a stupid price but I had secured the pair from a German metrology seller. As the usual I apologize for the rough pictures. I started by drilling a blind hole in the original crown "core" to be the largest possible without touching the threads. Then cut off the button from a spare screwdown crown. That revealed the mistery of how the pipe, which holds the sliding portion and its spring, is attached to a screwdown crown. It's screwed in as well! But, once turned to press fit size into the hole of the original crown (3mm) there was not enough material to hold a firm friction fit. That I remedied turning and pressing in a brass sleeve. I left the contact surface a little rough to improve friction on the 0.05mm interference. I don't know why but most of my mechanical repairs involve sleeving and shimming. Then I turned a tube to push the above into the crown. It's sized so to be also used as a stump on the staking set. It went in without issue. Compressing air in there is not ideal, but once I realized it was too late to pull it out back and cut an escape groove. The finished item works fine on the case, all is left to do is to cut a new stem to size and return it to the happy jeweler.
    8 points
  26. It's been a helluva journey of learning and frustration but my first watch is done. Scratched the dial on my first day of learning but that's ok. I bought this...rather ugly and cheap watch as the sacrificial lamb for this but I'm definitely gonna cherish it forever as the first watch i ever worked on. Very pleased with how it came out. I even treated her to a sapphire crystal. Thanks for all the help everybody. I super appreciate everybody who helped me out. Gonna do a service on my Orange Monster next then onto my first true project watch.
    7 points
  27. I totally agree with you, and really appreciate the support. Thanks Nickelsilver. I do understand the economics involved, although as a consumer it can be hard to swallow. Ive had a couple of businesses and really do understand just how expensive they are to keep going, and how the cost is passed onto the customer. When I had the car workshop which I consider to be a very small business, it cost me many thousands each week just to open the doors. Customers sometimes struggled to understand why an hourly rate could possibly be so high, but it was very carefully calculated so we could keep the doors open. What I don't like is the disingenuous nature of some of these brands. Trying to tell you, you are getting something special when you aren't. The aforementioned brand made a big deal of their special stamped brass dials! it felt like they were taking advantage of their chosen market. I really can't stand that. Wow. Im not sure what to say! Thank you Claypipe. Im not sure I can take the credit for this. This is a very special forum that brings out the best in people from my point of view. But I am very pleased you like the watches, and would love to see your work. Welcome to the forum. Today is my 45th birthday and I’m very happy to have completed the watch I will be wearing for the rest of the year. I’ve finally got the brushing on the chapter ring exactly where I want it, the bleached silver just the right shade of white, and an even blue on the hands. Definitely making progress.
    7 points
  28. Update: I have manufactured a trial bezel from ceramic. It has a nice friction fit but loses the fit when a spacer ring is used between the watch body and bezel. This needs to be adjusted. I still need to add the coin edge and other markings but I am getting closer and closer. Here are a few pics of this process. The first picture shows the ceramic bezel in it's green state before removing from the workpiece and an 8+hour sintering cycle. Notice how much this ceramic shrinks from green state to final state. Original bezel can be seen sitting inside the green state ceramic one.
    7 points
  29. Here is "The Walpam" all back together. I still need to do a little tidying up around the crystal. Some quick on line research suggests the watch was sold somewhere between 1900 and 1910 from Walter Pamment's Jewellers, 137 Askew Road, London, W12 9AU Interestingly the property appears to have been built around 1900, and if you feel the urge to rent it today, you rent a shop close by do so for around £50,000.00 per annum. That price does seem a little steep, when you think that it probably cost a great deal less than that to build the place in 1900 Here is the view through the exhibition case back. All in all a very worthy member of the 404 club I would suggest.
    7 points
  30. Hi all, this is just a heads up for those who do not know… if you spot spam in the forum please do not respond with a post reply - it would be really helpful if you could click the ellipsis within that post and then choose “report” from the menu. Or in other words - report that post for spam. Now - the forum software we use automatically hides the post if just two members report that post, this is especially useful when I or other moderators are offline bearing in mind we’re all in different time zones. it will be impossible to eliminate spam but this is one tool we can all use to minimise it. BTW - Most spammers cannot even join as they’re already on a blacklist which I subscribe too. thanks for your help.
    7 points
  31. Hi all - here are some photos and description of my v1 diy watch cleaning machine. It is made of bits and bobs from the garage, dollar store, and amazon. I should first note that after much googling, what I made was directly inspired by a thread on reddit I came across by chance - here - https://www.reddit.com/r/watchrepair/comments/vk00i1/a_simple_watch_cleaning_machine/ Prices included below are in Canadian dollars. The frame of the machine is a lab support stand from Amazon. I was lucky to get this from warehouse deals for $18.89. Regular price is around $50, so a bit pricey. On the bottom of the stand I laser cut a holder from dollar store MDF (I think they call it 'craft board' to fit the jars I also got from the dollar store. I was hoping to use mason jars for the height and the nice sealing lids, as in the reddit thread, but the nice parts basket he used there was too expensive for me to order in Canada. I instead used wide mouth jars from the dollar store, I think they were $2.50 each. To load the parts, I have a pencil holder from the dollar store (~$1.50?) into which I have a bunch of pieces of stainless steel mesh ($20, amazon, for 5 sheets). I do not understand why formed products are so expensive (eg. the real baskets for watch cleaning machines). I cut a hole with a hole saw in a piece of wood and forced the mesh through with the cutout to make the rough 'baskets'. Not the nicest, but what I have at the moment for v1. Continued below as I think I can only attach 4 photos. Starting off here with the amazon stainless steel mesh product and the wood used to form the baskets. Some cut up pieces folded over inside to make compartments. I tried to solder these in place but that was a failure. So at the moment they are just set in there, and do move around. I think I will end up ordering some of those tiny little mesh baskets with lids - I have seen them for a reasonable price on etsy, of all places. Also I saw the parts basket used in the reddit thread on etsy for a more reasonable price as well, so may order to give it a try. The lab stand came with the clamp and gripper. In the gripper I have squeezed a 12v dc motor. Amazon, $15. It is 200 RPM. You can get these for extremely cheap on aliexpress, but I didn't want to wait for the shipping. I have subsequently ordered/received a 500 rpm motor from aliexpress - my thought was to use a potentiometer to slow it down, but have the extra speed to spin between wash/rinse/rinse. I think that the 200rpm is nice for cleaning but it doesn't do a good enough job with centrifugal force to get the first cleaner out, puts soap into my 1st rinse. Maybe my DIY solution just isn't the best. I have a flexible coupling, 4mm (on the motor side) to 5mm (approx diameter of the bolt I am using, I did have to add a bit of tape) to connect things up. At the bottom of the bolt there is a piece of aluminum, drilled so I can screw the pencil holder on, once loaded. A bit of a pain, but not like I am doing it all of the time. In a future version if I get that nice basket I may use little spring clips to grab its handle. Couple more photos of my current attachment method. I should note that I lost two parts from the basket when cleaning. One was the click spring - was at the bottom of 1st cleaner jar. So tiny it slipped through even the fine stainless mesh. The other was a spacer that Raketa uses on their balance bridge - it fell into where the pencil holder mesh meets the bottom and it was only luck that I happened to see it in there, shining a light. Another reason to switch to those little baskets with lids, I think. To control the machine, I have a pre-built controller, same as the redditor used ($20, amazon. I think it would have been close to the same price from aliexpress). It has multiple modes, but the one I found useful is where you can set time for direction one, stop time, time for reverse direction, and how many times this repeats. I have this on a little box I lasered, the redditor is just running it out in the open. It is dual power supply - a nice barrel plug for 5V, or can take up to 24v. When the DC motor stops to change direction, it is very sudden. I would like to get a litlte circuit for slow start/stop, but haven't been able to find if these exist. I don't have the know-how to build myself, only to wire up something someone else has built. I like how the mastermatic is nice and easy when it changes direction. I think that is all the detail I can think to note at this time. Hope this helps someone or gives some ideas.
    7 points
  32. I bought a 1975 Seiko automatic with a really nice emerald green and gold dial, and the entire watch was so sticky with old oil that I almost wonder if whoever serviced it last just dunked it in oil to try to get it working. I thought at first that the hairspring was kinked, but removing the balance and a close inspection under the microscope revealed that it was just caked with old sticky oil, and most of the coils were sticking to each other. I tried cleaning it in lighter fluid three times before I ultimately gave up and ordered some L&R 556 fluid and an ultrasonic cleaner. With the movement given an actual proper cleaning, the balance swung free and clear and I had high hopes that I would get a usable watch in the end. On the plus side, I have an ultrasonic cleaner now, and it made cleaning up the watch case much easier. The crystal was completely destroyed so I had to source a new one along with a new band, but the dial only had a few spots where oil seemed to have seeped through from behind. I didn't want to touch it much, but was able to gently dab up most of it with some rodico. Unfortunately there was one spot where a small drop of oil had gotten under the clear coat and destroyed the paint underneath. As soon as I touched that part it all came away leaving a spot of bare metal. The rest of the watch looks good enough though that I can ignore this small blemish, and with everything cleaned up and a bit of regulating it's running really nicely. Here are a couple of shots I took for reference before the cleaning (didn't take any of the sticky balance, sorry)
    7 points
  33. Just throwing this out there to see your opinions. Typically I trust that the mainspring that I find in a watch is the correct one. However, I recently opened a watch and found that it was definitely not the correct mainspring. Someone hacked a T-end mainspring into a normal manual bridle. I could not find any information about the movement online, so I endeavored to find out what the proper mainspring might have been. Assuming that mainsprings are designed to follow the 1/3 area rule (that the unwound mainspring in the barrel should occupy 1/3 of the barrel width), then thickness and length must scale with the barrel diameter. I took every available mainspring being sold on Cousins, and plotted the thickness of the mainspring vs the barrel diameter, and I found an extremely statistically significant relationship between the two (see picture). From the results, we find that the thickness of the mainspring is equal to 1.18% of the barrel diameter, minus 0.0036 mm (this tiny subtraction can probably be ignored). Alternatively, you can take the average of all the thickness/diameter ratios, and you get 1.14%. If you have a low-grade non-jeweled watch, you can add one standard deviation, which will bring you to 1.26%. If you have a very high grade 21 jewel watch, you can subtract a standard deviation, which will bring you to 1.02%. When reading this page about estimating thicknesses (https://www.vintagewatchstraps.com/mainsprings.php), the author says that deCarle and Daniels have suggested anywhere between barrel diameter/100, up to barrel diameter/84. These figures suggest anywhere between 1% and 1.19%, so I don't think my method is too far from reality.
    7 points
  34. Done it!!! Thank you I took out the balance and palate fork. Wheels ok. Inserted everything again. Same problem. Backs to train. Took off Mainspring winder and saw that the click was not in correctly. It was not actually pressured against the click spring. Reset and connected everything. Woohoo!
    7 points
  35. I have branched off the Tools & Equipment sub-forum and made it a separate section on the front page with sub-forums on specific topics. I have done this because, as a sub-forum, the Tools & Equipment area was getting way too congested and it was difficult to find if a topic was already discussed. I've moved a heck of a lot of posts from the old sub-forum into relevant sub-sections but there is still about 60 more pages to go through, I will chip away at moving posts into the new categories whenever I have a spare moment, and hopefully some of the mods here can do the same, but in the meantime, please try to help by checking the new sub-forums in the "Tools & Equipment" section and post any new threads in the correct place The old, Tools & Equipment sub-forum has been retained as a "General" sub-forum to the new front page section and no posts have been lost. If you previously posted there and cannot find your post then you can either find it via your profile page or by going through the sub-forums, I have tried to be as accurate as possible so far in matching topics to the sub-forum. New section: https://www.watchrepairtalk.com/forum/55-tools-and-equipment/ Old sub-forum, now part of above new section: https://www.watchrepairtalk.com/forum/21-general-tools-equipment-discussion/ Thanks for your co-operation
    7 points
  36. I've seen rings like that used as spacers on the crown wheels. Take off the two screws and plate holding it down, and you might find it goes in the center of the wheel between the wheel and its pivot.
    7 points
  37. Here's a cutaway with close ups of the two ends. The sideshake is 0.01, which is about right for a 0.15 pivot (this size). If the arbor is under tension, it will generally want to tilt- like when you try to wind the watch with the wheel train in but haven't put the bridge yet- everything tilts . With a very small but existant endshake, the shoulders of the arbor can touch both flat surfaces of the two jewels at the same time. With a little more endshake, as the tilt is restricted by the pivots, it will become possible for one shoulder to touch one jewel (and is almost certainly the case 99.999999% of the time), but both shoulders can't contact both jewels at the same time.
    7 points
  38. I was given a small ladies watch to repair that was not working, not even cased. No clues as to what the issue was, but as long as I could get it going again without sinking a bunch of money on parts it would be considered a success. I took the challenge. Man what was I thinking? Movement: FHF (FONT) 120, 17 Jewel Fontainemelon SA Type: Ladies, manual wind. Rate: 18,000 bph. plate size: 6.75 x 8 ligne Findings: Motion Works. Able to change time smoothly, hands have good clearance. Switching between winding and time setting is not clean. Setting Lever arm was broken off and wedged in wheel train. Prevented smooth flow of wheels so no power was coming form mainspring to escape wheel. No Case or crystal. Dial is scratched and dirty (will not be able to restore dial to original shape). Movement is scratched as well and has fibers and dirt throughout. Watch was very dirty and oil had solidified causing it to become abrasive. Mainspring holds power, but is old and may not be able to sustain same level of power and there is no power compensating bend. Arbor looks ok, scraping on barrel case, but due to prior repairs (not movement fault). Teeth look ok. Very old grease dried inside barrel, needed to be scrubbed to remove (not just placed in cleaning machine). Mainspring is old style (no reverse bend to allow for sustained power). Wheel Train: No power on escape wheel when pallet fork removed, even after winding a few turns. Loosened the train bridge and wheels started to turn again. Found the culprit under the watch movement as the end of the setting lever arm had been lodged in amoungst the wheels. Re attached bridge and good movement observed from wheel train when wound. End shake minimal (might want to adjust jewel depth on a couple wheels if performance issues experienced). Teeth all intact, pinions ok, and pivots not bent. Jewels pivot holes in wheel train appear good. Pallett Fork: guard pin and pallet jewels looks good. Banking pins not bent (part of plate). Does not spring fully to opposite banking pin when tapped on end. This turned out due to no power being transferred up wheel train. Fair amount of end shake, and good drop depth on entry and exit. Balance Complete: Balance wheel is old school with timing screws (inconsistent material removed on opposite sides of wheel may lend to poising issue) No Incabloc protection. Balance rotates for about 5 -10 seconds before it stops. Timing information: Unable to obtain accurate timing until endshake problem resolved. Amplitude low in some positions (new mainspring would help, and fixing jewel problem as well). Cracked lower balance jewel provides problems. Also showing signs that either one of the pallet fork jewels or impulse jewel needs to be adjusted. Repairs: Setting Lever Spring broken - replaced Mainspring - needs new spring for better amplitude Balance staff pivot broken - replaced Balance spring twisted and bent - fixed Balance spring collet to wide - need to be closed more for better fit Timing washer required to poise balance Double roller table - replaced Lower Balance jewel chipped - needs to be replaced jewels need to be adjusted to reduce end shake. All the parts disassembled prior to cleaning. The mainspring should be replaced as it is retaining its compressed shape so has lost power and does not have the reverse curve for sustained power. Mainspring cover was scratched, and had grease in the barrel that was one of the worst I have seen. Cleaned the barrel and cover manually before placing them in the ultrasonic. Broken setting lever spring and replacement. Ultrasonic cleaning machine. 5 minutes cleaning solution, spin off cleaner, then 4 minutes in rinse #1 and #2 (spinning off liquid between each jar). Followed by 5 minutes in the drying chamber. Pegged out the jewels in the main plate and bridges. Did the balance separately since it had issues (normally would screw it in place on the plate for cleaning). Ready to start addressing the problem parts and reassemble. Straightened bent hairspring. Removed stud, ran an oiler from the collet (center) to the stud location on the edge to remove the tangle. Made several bends to straighten the balance spring so flat, and so it had the right terminal curve, even gaps all around. Balance staff pivot was broken as well. Luckily had one in stock, so you can see the replacement staff in the background. Balance spring stud is in pin vise, and stud pin is sitting next to balance spring in preparation for re-attachement. Threaded the spring through the stud, then passed the very small tapered pin next to lock the stud to the balance spring. Still had to work on a the remaining bends after this picture was taken for the terminal curve and the slight bend before the stud. Lastly had to reduce collet opening since it would not firmly attach to the balance staff. Another problem found and resolved. Removing the double roller table using the 18R inverto staking tools. Positioned staking tool roller table remover and pivot punch. Placed the roller remover arm in the hole in the center of the staking tool base. Turning the knurled knob to gradually tighten the two blades of the remover so they were wedged between the bottom of the roller table and the balance arms. One VERY gentle tap and the double roller table removed, impulse jewel intact. Setting up the balance staff remover on the staking tool base, with the tip of the associated staff staking tool loaded and visible inside gap in tool. (dark square floating above the broken pivot head). The staff remover was tightened securely to prevent damage to the balance wheel. A couple more light taps and the balance staff passed through the balance wheel. Surface of wheel arms in good shape. There are three possible balance staffs to pick from that vary only in overall length A and distance B. The balance staff I used was 2.77 mm in length. (Could possibly try the 2.80 for less endshake) Attaching the new balance staff. Using the rounded tip staking tool with hole just large enough for pivot to enter in order to create the rivet ridge first. Then used the flot staking tool (seen to the left leaning against the base) to smooth over the ridged material created in the first step which secures the staff to the balance wheel. Not the slickest job, but this balance has a few miles on it. The staff is firmly attached (does not twist in setting) and the balance arms were not warped because of the operation. Truing the wheel in calipers after staking. It had a bit of a wobble, but after cinching up caliper ends over the pivots to protect them, and performing a few extremely gentle bends using my thumb, got the balance wheel true. It is a solid wheel and the round was not affected but verified was true in the round as well. Doesn't show up well in this picture, but there is an adjustable arm protruding out of the calipers next to the bottom right of the balance wheel. This arm has a parallel surface you are aligning with the edge of the balance wheel to indicate if the wheel is running truly flat for the whole circumference as you rotate the balance and check for level. Reattached double roller table using staking tool. Placed roller table over a hole in the die base that was big enough for the pivot, placed the balance staff (wheel attached) through the base of the roller table and tapped the roller table onto the staff. Appears to be level and pivots look perfect now. However, all is not well! When I reattached the roller table, either I did not notice it had a problem before, or I was guilty of tapping one time too many to get it seated in place. The top of the impulse jewel is below the safety roller table surface, which I did not immediately notice and which shows up later to be a problem for me. Next was poising the wheel. Gently pushed the balance wheel with a feather to get it to start rolling on the two ruby rails of the poising tool. It had a heavy spot on one side as it always stopped at the same spot when spinning it gently on the leveled ruby poising tool. Added a timing washer under the timing screw on the opposite side. Timing screw end is visible in the timing screw adjusting tool. After that the wheel seemed to stop at random spots from that point on, so I was lucky not to have a long session. Re-attached hairspring collet (pressed on using flat tips of tweezers). Found the old broken pivot wedged in the balance jewel oil well and removed it. The lower blalance jewel is chipped and needs to be replaced. The end cap (not shown) looked ok, no pitting. Balance wheel sits well dial down. Can see the new timing washer on the left most timing screw (it is clear of touching anything) and the screw head is not protruding far enough to touch the plate. Balance spring is sitting flat and in the regulator. There is a bit too much endshake in the balance though. I believe the balance jewels on the main plate may need to be moved in a bit. Fork end looks fine, along with the guard pin. Banking pins seem straight, not sure how to tell if they are 90 degrees perpendicular, but nothing obvious showing. (can still see the broken pivot in the jewel in the background) Wow is this timing ugly! Attempting to adjust timing is futile until the jewels are replaced and adjusted. Also believed there was an overbanking problem or with either the impulse jewel or one of the pallet fork jewels due to the staggered second timing line? Watch runs ok in dial down and vertical positions. As soon as it moves towards dial up the balance stops. The impulse jewel ends up on the wrong side of the pallet fork instead of being inside it. Somehow the impulse jewel is jumping over the guard forks. Initially I thought it was due to excessive endshake. Here is an example of when the impulse jewel is jumping out of the pallet fork horn and sitting on the pallet horn . When it finishes it’s movement, the impulse jewel pushes off on the horn sending it back to the other banking pin and the watch stops running since it is now overbanked. That is when NickelSilver informed me that the roller table appeared to be crushed (see the red background picture earlier), which explained the impulse jewel jumping over the pallet. So I needed to replace the roller table. Instead of tapping it in, I decided to use the jewel lever attachment to press it in gently. Watched closely to make sure not to press any further once the gap between the roller table and the balance wheel was closed. Once this was done, the overbanking issue was resolved and the watch would run in all positions. The pallet jewels appear to have a proper drop on either side of the pallet. The jewels appear to have decent surfaces, and I later removed the pallet and cleaned the excess moebius 9145 off the rather greasy looking pallet stones. So the very last step prior to demagnetizing the watch again and adjusting the beat and rate, will be to replace the cracked balance jewel. To replace the jeweI I will be using the K&D staking tool set with a hollow ended jewel pusher and stump. Just checking that the size of the pusher is ever so slighly smaller than the jewel, and the hole in the hollow stump is larger than the jewel. After the jewel is out, I will double check it’s diameter by using a jewel reamer to test the hole size (the new jewel will be a fraction larger than that reamer size). And take a depth reading off the micrometer on the staking tool prior to removing the old jewel so I can replace it at the same depth it was inserted to previously. (Note: These two example pictures had the balance bridge posing for me instead of the main plate to just illustrate the process I will do. When working on the plate I need to push the jewel in from the inside of the watch plate for the balance jewel. That wraps it up for this fix. It was satisfying to have all the little victories making it past each challenge presented and was a good experience. I still have to spend time adjusting the beat and rate and possibly the end shake, but the major work is complete. Cheers. Terry
    7 points
  39. From this To this
    7 points
  40. So here it is. I couldnt wait to post this as I'm over the moon with it. I've wanted one since i started collecting. Would you believe i asked the universe for it ( the right way ) two weeks ago. So a couple of weeks ago i was at n.cave e.yorks carboot talking to a guy about watches . He had a couple of non descript clocks that i wasn't interested in but i asked if he had any watches. He said no not with him but at home he had a w.w.w. ( very large clue as to what is coming )wristwatch that he had had fixed but had broke again. I asked if he wanted to sell it and if so bring it in two weeks time when i come back up this way to see my sister. He said ok. He told me it had a blackface and he thought it was an Ingersoll. I wasn't aware Ingersoll made www watches and had never seen one so i thought maybe he's mistaken. So anyway keen to go back yesterday morning, i mooched around the carboot for an hour taming my anxiety and excitement ( i dont like to rush a universal gift, its not respectful and can get taken away as quickly as its given ). In doing that i also picked up a lovely 404ish clock. Eventually i made my way over to the guy's inside stall. Now then matey how's you i said , gud he replied, I've brought you something. He searched through a carrier and i was thinking it cant be much of a watch to chuck it in a carrier bag. A minute of searching and i thought hes forgot it never mind. Ahha he says pulls it out and hands it to me ( the watch ) . I look at it and look at him. Then I look at it, and I look at it , and then I look at it some more. Oh crap its a w10 military watch. He tells me the mainspring has gone, i said no it hasn't, its just fully wound. Have a look inside he said if you want. I had taken a screwback remover a loupe and a piece of rodico with me. I undid the back and peered inside. Its a Record i said, oh at least i know what it is now he said. I had a little prod with the rodico, unfortunately one of the staff pivots had broken, the top one. I said what do you want for it, he gave me his price I'm not saying how much but it was cheap. I said no i cant give you that, so he came down a tenner. I said no i cant give you that either. He said I'm not taking any less that that for it, i said i know your not, your going the wrong way. He looked at me confused, i said take your first price and double it. He looked at me even more confused. Mate its worth more than double what you want , I've got to fix it but I'm happy with that if you are. He wouldn’t take double and we settled in the middle. I gave him his money, we chatted for 15 mins and then shook hands, before i left he said i think i have a couple of pocket watches at home, ill bring them next week, if you come again you can have them. Wow Universe what have i done to deserve your praise. So here it is. As far as i can tell up to now. Its a redialled record dirty dozen (possibly). The movement is the same as the Record DD, the dial serial number relates to the Record. I have yet to date it yet but the movement 022K according to ranfft started being manufactured in the 1920s. Anyone that has some serious knowledge on military watches, i would be so grateful for any help working out what i have here. Here it is i absolutely love ❤ it .
    7 points
  41. Without Youtube, or should I say the Internet, I would never have gotten into servicing/repairing. So I guess you're right about that. Nevertheless, it wasn't that I just happened to see one of those watch repair videos that got me started. It was a strong inner urge to be able to service a watch (long story) that drove me to actively research the Internet for information about it. Being well over 50 years old, having young kids, and doing fairly well in my profession, going to a watch school just wasn't an option (something I mourn quite a lot). I remember watching some of the videos on the Watch Repair Channel but having zero knowledge of watch repair, those videos basically just made me feel intimidated and confused. I should say that these days with all the knowledge I have obtained over the years I appreciate the Watch Repair Channel immensely and there's basically only one other repairer that I respect as much as Mark and perhaps even more. That repairer has a member name on this forum being a combination of one transition metal and one precious metal Eventually, I found a Youtube channel named "Ratfaced git". It was hosted by a retired car mechanic named Dan. Naturally, his approach was much that of a car mechanic, rather than that of a skilled and experienced watch repairer. Dan hardly knew the names of parts, didn’t care much and was proud of it. It inspired me endlessly and gave me - at that time a complete mechanical idiot - the courage to try it myself on one of those Vostok movements that could be had on eBay for a few dollars. Honestly, without those videos, I’m not sure my interest would have taken off and that I would be writing this post. I have now taken several online courses and I have some of the books by Fried and DeCarle, and I have learned tons on this forum, but without that retired car mechanic, I'm not sure that would have happened. Have I butchered any watches? Well, butchered is a strong word, but to be honest, some of the watches that I have been working on would likely have been better off in the hands of a pro. For that, I apologise to the watch gods and the pros. Yes, they all make it look so easy, don't they? Complete and perfect service and repair of a Rolex 3135 in under 40 minutes, and for that, "the pros have the audacity to charge $500 or more". Having some personal experience of what it takes to just service a watch without doing any repairs, I'm personally amazed that the pros can even survive at those rates, but I guess they're really good at what they're doing. Nevertheless, I think these Youtube videos are great for promoting watches in general and that means more people will want to have "a real watch" and that is a good thing for the trade on the whole. Sure, some of those affordable vintage watches will be butchered in the process, and however sad that is, there are millions and millions of them out there. And, although there's a lot of ooohing and ahhhing in the comment sections, I rarely see comments where people express that the video gave them the confidence to service/repair the family heirloom themselves.
    7 points
  42. Late to the party, but this is my first proper luxury Swiss timepiece that I've owned. Only picked this up last month. An Omega Speedmaster Moonwatch Professional Co-Axial Master Chronometer Chronograph 42mm (The sapphire sandwich version). I’m over the moon (no pun intended) with it and wear it almost on a daily basis. I love the Co-Axial Master Chronometer Calibre 3861 and the open exhibition style case back to see it in all it's glory. Never, ever, ever going to even take the case back off this watch! Before any of you have thoughts of the horrors a newbie like me could cause this masterpiece of craftsmanship and engineering.
    7 points
  43. I assumed that these correctors have to be pushd out from the inside of the case and 3D-printed an appropriate tool which I used in combination with a pair of parallel plyers. It worked!
    7 points
  44. I just tested „Dr.Tillwich Antispread“ by partially treating a hand mirror with it. The picture of two oil drops shows impressively where the Antispread has been applied.
    7 points
  45. My collection changes regularly as I do lots of watch trading. I really don't need most of the watches I have and many are project watches that I intend to restore, some of which I will keep and some I will let go. But since I'm new here, I thought I'd share my collection with others so you can know a little more about me. Not included in this shot are some I recently sold, a Seiko 62mas and a Seiko World Time. Some of these are heirlooms or gifts from my wife of 40+ years. You can see I am a bit obsessed with Seiko. Sorry.
    7 points
  46. I was inspired by a post on the Watch Repair Lessons Facebook group showing a DIY watch bench. It's using a 62" Husky adjustable height desk with some added rails along the back and sides and a Vyco table mat on the desktop. My old setup was so cramped and jumbled together and now after getting rid of my old office desk, I have a lot more room to work and I can adjust the height of the desk to ideal. I'll eventually be adding some more drawers/tables along the sides for storage. It was (somewhat) cost effective with the desk costing $199 (on sale), the Vyco mat $75 (free shipping), and the rails just some pine from my local lumber yard for $14.
    7 points
  47. Updating to THIRD Vulcain Cricket (Sensilarm) done except for the sweep second hand. To bring this one to life I had to: 1) new staff 2) turned a new pusher 3) replaced keyless works (clutch and winding pinion, crown gear, setting lever and setting lever screw) 4) sweep second pinion I am now in the hunt for a sweep second hand. I put a lot of money into this thing...I think...it has been going on for about nine months. Bought parts on ebay, NOS material houses, donor watch, and I made the pusher.
    7 points
  48. Holiday present to myself. I ordered an ETA 2824-2 elabore movement, PVD coated stainless case with sapphire crystals, dial and hands from a watch materials supplier in Switzerland. None of this stuff was cheap, but the seller guarantees that all the parts are Swiss made and I don't have any reason to believe the items are not genuine. The strap is made in China, but I don't believe in spending big money on 'designer' leather straps. So what do you folks think?
    7 points
  49. I have fixed several watches for my neighbors and advertised to other friends that I would fix their watches--for free. So...it has been fun. Those who get their watch back in perfect working order love me and have promised to attend my funeral (as far as I know I am not about to die--but only God knows). Well, this developed beyond my expectation. My neighbor contacted all of her friends, law enforcement, customers, other neighbors, friends (neighbor is a Lt. in the local Sheriff department). So in order to feed my insatiable desire to fix things of horology (although one friend asked if I could fix an ancient typewriter), she gathered a pile of timing pieces to be fixed. I received them this evening as a Christmas gift. Each piece with an attached email address so that I can communicate with the owner. They have been informed that when their item is fixed, they must come to my little watch shop to pick it up. LOL...I love it. I have not counted, but I would guess about twenty watches and maybe eight clocks. I love this journey I am on, and I love to see the joy I bring when someone gets their time piece running. There are no watchmakers in the area, so people just give up on their time piece. So, I am now buried in work. And...I know already...I will not be able to accomplish this work without the wisdom of my friends on this forum, so I thank you in advance!!!
    7 points
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