Jump to content

Leaderboard

  1. JohnR725

    JohnR725

    Advanced Member


    • Points

      754

    • Content Count

      2844


  2. watchweasol

    watchweasol

    Advanced Member


    • Points

      671

    • Content Count

      4389


  3. Nucejoe

    Nucejoe

    Advanced Member


    • Points

      614

    • Content Count

      5323


  4. jdm

    jdm

    WRT Patron


    • Points

      602

    • Content Count

      6518


Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 07/30/20 in all areas

  1. We made a balance tack in school, but aside from that time I haven't really used it. A much handier tool is this one which was a standard tool made in watchmaking schools here. The "tack" is a threaded pin which can be placed in one of several holes (usually 2 or 3 sizes of tapers on several pins). Choosing an appropriate pin and hole location, the balance isn't hanging as it sits on the table, so no risk to the hairspring. The overarm presses down on the rim, which is supported from the inside by the little "V" so that work can easily be done on screws (it's a non-screw balance in the pic bu
    14 points
  2. The clock strikes Christmas 1975 and these two sister were each given a watch which they are, here on a picture, proudly showing off. Their last parent recently passed away and in the parents "jewellery-box" one of the thought long lost watches emerged again. Inside the back-lid was the name S.Kocher stamped, a Swiss company long gone, went begin 1980's during the "Quartz"-crisis under. The watch was in their line of the "Royce"-watches and had an undisturbed Swiss 21.600BHP, 17-jewels AS1726 cheased /non-running movement.
    13 points
  3. Intro A while back I successfully made my first attempt refitting and adjusting pallet stones using shellac. It was something I had dreaded doing (it seemed difficult) but in the end it wasn’t that difficult at all. Having gathered experience from a few years of handling tiny watch parts using tweezers and having developed some left-hand dexterity as well (I’m right handed) probably helped. Anyway, I thought I’d share the experience with anyone who would be interested and hopefully there’ll be some other WR-talker, now or in the future, who’ll find it useful. If you’re new to th
    12 points
  4. This project has been ongoing for about six months. Another specimen from the box-o-watches. It was a mess when I dug it out. The dial was a wreck. It had the alarm, minute, and hour hand but no second hand. At the time, I did not know it was supposed to have one. Found out later that the center wheel was busted. The first threshold was to see if I could get the dial refinished. I won't go into the ordeal, but it took about four months from start to finish! I had a crystal in my stock so that was not an issue. I bought a donor watch that had some of the parts I needed and the
    10 points
  5. Part 3 is a sort of redemption, or at least some lessons learned. The donor arrived about six weeks later (thank you Covid) and I quickly transferred the balance complete. The wavy traces quickly returned. So I stripped the movement again, paying close attention to the barrel arbor bearings. Looking closely, I could see that the barrel had actually been scraping the bottom of the barrel bridge. Manipulating the barrel with the bridge on and the train removed, I could also see that, under torque, the barrel would foul both the bridge and possibly the mainplate. Swapping in the donor m
    10 points
  6. Hi, I teach watchmaking to complete beginners at Epping Forest Horology Centre, close to Epping and this is one of the lessons on the BFG 866. I wanted to show my class a classic pin pallet (Roskopf) movement and how to service it, as many watchmakers won't touch these watches as they hold no monetary value. Turn the setting lever screw 1 to 1 and a half turns to release the winding stem A piece of watch paper or small plastic jiffy bag to protect the dial, whilst removing the hands The driving pinion is part of the frict
    9 points
  7. Hey everyone, here's a fun and affordable 3D photography side project. I really owe Andy Hull for giving me the inspiration and information I needed to pull this off! In addition to horology, I'm an avid photographer. I've been studying and practicing photography seriously for 20 years now, having bought my first real camera in 2000. If anyone is curious, the camera was a Canon Canonet QL17 GIII. Some of my work has been in galleries, and I'm a couple of classes away from completing a photography degree. When I became fascinated by photography, I wanted but couldn't afford a digital
    9 points
  8. Please forgive the poor quality snapshot, but it all came together. I am over the moon! Here's my first completed fordite-dialed watch: I'll provide a more complete write up, better photos, and another completed watch example ASAP.
    9 points
  9. In order to maintain a healthy and friendly community there are some restrictions for new members as well as benefits for those who contribute the most to this forum. It has occurred to me - or rather, been pointed out to me that I have never really made the details clear. And for that I apologise and I hope this post will be helpful. All members will find their current forum status in the left pane of any content they post on the forum (non-mobile) or by clicking on their display name to view their profile. MEMBER LEVELS NEW MEMBERS (Zero to 9 Posts) New members can
    9 points
  10. This is a guy I have been watching on Youtube. He has some very good and interesting videos to watch some are for those just starting out. Here is a a nice one from him about Tweezers. He has a very good one on watch oils and grease. I have subscribed to his channel and I hope you will do the same.
    8 points
  11. I have multiple staking sets that I inherited. The small one sits on a table behind the watch bench...it is the one I go to normally. Today I got to looking at one of the others. I have looked at it before but never understood why it had pulleys and such. So...today...I decided to figure it out. Happily I discovered that there was a sort-of brochure tucked in the box. It explained that the tool could be used as a drill press. Wow! Here it is attached to my lathe. Now I know why I have more than one lathe...lol.
    8 points
  12. A recent online purchase and repair to a 1983 Timex commonly called "Red Dot Diver". Bought in non-working order I found internal damage due to a sheared pillar screw. With the aid of my parts collection all was corrected. Here is the before and after. - New Crystal - replace pillar screw - replace hour wheel - COA ( clean, oil, adjust ) - polish buff Only follow up has been with the seconds hands not seating correctly. This is very common with vintage Timex because there is no center tube. So once lifted off the seconds wheel the hole tends to be distorted. T
    8 points
  13. Thought I'd share another triumph, for me anyway. I'm still new to this game and don't have a dedicated work space and only functional tools. Picked up this 1970's "30" jewelled automatic wonder just before Christmas. It wasn't without issues. In it's past someone had poured a load of oil into it (smelt a bit on opening) and it took a while to clean it all by hand, soaking this and pegging that. I was lucky enough to find parts which proved invaluable and educational. I even plucked up courage and practised removal and lubricating shock jewels which was a first for me, still have a healt
    8 points
  14. This is just a beautify watch and I have to share a pic. Comes from watchmakers personal collection. I scan see why he held on to it.
    8 points
  15. I bought a slightly modded Seiko SKX007 off of eBay, about which in general a more experienced man than I here aptly quoted Obi Wan Kenobi: "you will never find a more wretched hive of scum and villainy." LOL. To be fair, the watch was accurately described cosmetically, more or less, but I didn't take the time to read the description. One thing that wasn't entirely accurate was the representation that the watch "works well." Well, it did run, but not to expectations. The amplitude was low, the beat error high and the rotor felt sluggish. So what's a newby to do? Well, a full service of
    8 points
  16. 1919 Burlington by Vortic Watch CO. USA
    8 points
  17. Hi all, Since it was impossible to find a how-to guide for servicing a tourbillon (in this case the seagull ST8000) on the internet, I decided to create one myself and share it on a couple of places on the internet. I hope you guys enjoy it and it will help you in the future. There are basically 2 types of tourbillons (other than multi-axles ones) 1. The brequet carroussel type (big balance wheel, turns 360 degrees around his own axle in 1 minute) 2. the blancpain flying type (the whole escapement and balance turn 360 degrees in circles like a planet in a minute) This is the
    8 points
  18. Well, that was so easy as to be anticlimactic. I figured 30 minutes was enough curing for a glue I would be removing with acetone anyway, so I gave it a shot using my desktop jeweler's vise (cushioned by some soft plastic). I wouldn't have tried this without a case vice except that I noticed the design of the lugs gave two nice reinforced perpendicular surfaces that would fit easily into a jeweler's vice without significant risk of damage. Slow, even pressure with a 1 1/8" wrench opened the caseback on my first attempt. Easy peasy. Thanks all for the advice!
    8 points
  19. I was allways fascinated by Gems, Minerals and Meteorites. Then there was a Video on Youtube about a Watch with a Meteorite-Dial. I want that too...... luckily i could buy a Meteorite-Dial with 31mm Diameter. But the way the Guy in this Video made it was not acceptable for me, i dont want to glue the Dial to the Movement and he did not use the Screws to fix the Movement to the Holder. So i bought Dial-Feets and glued them to the Dial, for this i made a Fixture to get the exact Position for the Dial-Feets. So far so good, but the Dial was not flush with the Spacer (Werkhaltering)
    7 points
  20. $5 each at a yard sale today. The Omega has a 625 in it. Both are running.
    7 points
  21. Hello all. I recently posted a video on my youtube channel showing the process I use to make pivot drills. I hope its helpful. Comments and critiques welcomed.
    7 points
  22. A dip in the ultrasonic bath, some lubrication, a new crystal and a pimpt up bracelet and it’s back to it’s 60’s bling bling shape. Not bad for a few dollars more, even Clint Eastwood would agree
    7 points
  23. This is a great tool for the watchmaker when he wants to replicate a part, or even the watch repair man sometimes needs to make a new bridge. The tool is used to transfer the hole positions from the part you want to replicate. Usually, it is fastened into a wise in the square part you can see in the picture, but here I just show you what it does. On the tool you got two snuggly fitted rods which is pointy in the both ends; these has to be exactly centered with each other. I mostly use a nickelsilver alloy when doing the parts since you get a much nicer finish to the parts
    7 points
  24. My Timex Waterbury 2018 backlight was intermittent from new. This was a 60th birthday present which I really appreciated so I didn't want to try and return it in the heat of the Pandemic. After about a month the Idiglo stopped working altogether even though the watch keeps excellent time. The illumination itself was working fine when it worked at all. The problem was that pushing the watch crown inwards to activate the light seemed at fault. Towards the end I found I had to pull the crown out slightly and then press to get the light to come on. This ran the risk of accidentally changing t
    7 points
  25. No great achievement of mine; installed a NOS hour hand, and a cleaning for good measure. I simply wanted to post this here among people who would appreciate a fine vintage wristwatch. It would technically be a lady's watch. The gold is thick on it, but I'm sure it's only plated. I'm wearing it to keep an eye on it. It was sporadically sluggish before the cleaning. And so far the hands are not conflicting. She's a beauty, isn't she? My watch dealer friend will be setting her out for sale once I deliver her back. No clue what he'll be asking.
    7 points
  26. Oh boy this was hard. So I had an A-17 Waltham 6/0 military watch with a busted staff. The first one I ordered was incorrect. The second one I ordered was correct. I watched this WRT video about a dozen times: "Fitting a new balance staff to a vintage 1940s cyma www military watch" I read the Bulova training manual (fitting a balance staff) that somebody posted the other day. Once I was comfortable with the process, I dove in. Imagine that, just like on the video, the roller came off in two pieces. Removing and installing the staff went off pretty much like the
    7 points
  27. A greate thanks to ya all, and to HSL for helping out...sends you a befor and after pic.
    7 points
  28. It was productive week with these 3 watches and getting them in working order. The Bancor AS1187/94 was the only one received that was running but needed a new mainspring and cleaning. The Elgin 730A wristwatch stopped and started and the pocket watch had a broken staff. The PW, Elgin grade 96, was a gift for my father. All running well now. Lastly, I made some cosmetic improvements to my staking set last month. The tools inside needed minor refreshing but the box had seen better days. Scraped to bare wood - poplar - stained and finished. before: after:
    7 points
  29. It has been a bit of saga but worth it. Finally cut a screw for the 8 days French alarm clock. One of the four to fasten the pillars to the base, three were missing. I am almost sure that all its sizes are in French lignes (symbol: ‴), to begin with the pitch of 4 threads per ligne (0.564mm). The head is 2‴ x 1 exactly. The pitch is easy to get if your lathe has a bunch of gears. But the profile is another story, antique threads have rounded crests and valleys. I can only hypotize on how that could be reproduced in an home shop - not easily. Anyway, just like my Swiss-exiled counsel
    7 points
  30. I figured I'd post the watch that started me on this journey. It really is quite gorgeous. I saved the photos from the original ebay listing. The listing said, "ART DECO 1930s BULOVA ENGRAVED CASE WATCH NEAR MINT" I've since learned that the watch is not from the 1930's but is a 1928 Surrey. Also, not mentioned in the listing is that it was recased in an Illinois Watch Co. case. I actually like this case much more than the original Surrey case so I can't really complain about that. The only real issue is that the movement just kind floats in the case since the movement isn't actually atta
    7 points
  31. Hi, Just wanted to show a before and after of a recent project. I completed Mark’s online courses a few months ago and have done a few small projects. Mainly servicing and repair of movements. I am an Omega collector and wanted to acquire the Seamaster Racing 1974 due to the Cal. 564 movement. I bought this on eBay for $500 and yes it was as rough as it looks. Rust, corrosion and badly maintained movement. I managed to find a NOS replacement crystal and bezel. I serviced and repaired the movement back to Chronometer specs. Unfortunately, I can not ta
    7 points
  32. I am a father of four. And I am still coming 'round to the fact of my oldest daughter, Sophie, having turned 18. She will be the first of them to graduate high school, with honors at that. She has been offered "free rides" recently by a couple universities based on her grades, and has chosen Ball State for its computer science program. And, being eighteen, she immediately registered to vote so that she could (pardon the political post) vote the orange-haired fascist out. She and her friends and fellow classmates seem determined to undo all the injustice, unrest, and damage that has had su
    7 points
  33. LOL, last night my neighbor was over for happy hour and I am telling her about my watchmaking renaissance. She says she has this watch that belonged to her grandmother...wondering about it. So she runs it over today and hands it to me to check out. Oh my!
    7 points
  34. Hi, Just wanted to share my experience of radial brushing on a Seiko 7005-8160P. I built a little jig using a block of wood, plastic case press, and Wood screw. I think the pictures are quite explanatory. The red tape was used just take up the slack. Using a junior Jigsaw blade with some 600 grit paper wrapped around it and short 5mm strokes back and forward as the case is rotated slowly. Using the long slot I made in the screw head as a guide. The height of the screw is adjusted so that the Jigsaw blade is flat against the case and not at an angle. It's working pretty well. Will post a pictur
    7 points
  35. Arrived today from Japan: A lovely Hamilton Jazzmaster Automatic. Nice clean lines, and is currently ticking away on the TimeGrapher: +13 s/day, Amplitude: 258 deg., Beat Error: 0.4 ms. in face up.
    7 points
  36. If my dad were still alive, he would be 105 yrs old. When he passed, I got the majority of his gear--watch bench, lathe, staking sets, hand tools, etc. These are in one room of my house--I call it the lab...you see...I am an electrical engineer (Ph.D). The other stuff in the room are electronic in nature (soldering/desoldering station, parts bins, microscope, oscilloscope...etc.) My dad owned a business in Houston, TX for 50+ years. He wanted me to follow in his footsteps but I chose engineering. In addition to all of the tools, I inherited lots of old watches. Many were left at his
    7 points
  37. Ok I didn't make a 3D model or anything, but laid out the most important part, the plate. The back piece is 40mm x40mm, the arm can be anything hinged any way just so that it comes down over the balance rim. The support piece for the inside of the rim can also be anything, on the old tools they were V shaped and pressed into a hole, on my friends it's a simple pin that has a notch filed in it. The notch/V permits whatever bit of screw that is sticking out inside the rim to be unharmed when working on it. The threaded holes for the pins are a 2mm thread, but anything near that would be fine.
    7 points
  38. Hello fellow watch enthusiast, I have been working on a new dial and would like your thoughts on it. Created from bare brass and is not, I repeat is not a decal or a decal slide and is not pad printed. Tell me what you think.
    7 points
  39. Guys I did it it's working I cleaned the ground soldering and soldered a new wire then put it in an aluminum external hard drive case and stuffed the front and the back with aluminum foil and voilà it's working perfectly (well I don't know it it's perfect but who cars it's working). I tried a citizen 8200a and a Seiko 7009 and an Orient 46941 on Watch-o-scope and the results weren't satisfying at all looks like I have to service them again the Citizen and the Seiko rates are all jumping all over the place so I'm not including them to save my self some embarrassment . the Orient howe
    7 points
  40. It's time for me to give back.. these are not expensive items but it takes time to picture and ship, give with the sincere hope of helping, Offer is for old and new members worldwide, I reserve the right to not send to opportunists. Unless noted I will send one item per person Small countersunk screws, polished, Ø available 40, 45, 50, 55, 60, 65. Beginner's polishing compunds assortement. Includes one slice per type. More items to come as time permits.
    7 points
  41. I'm so glad this topic popped back up. I'm new here and hadn't seen it. Blue is probably my favorite dial color, in contention with champagne. Even so, looking through my collection I appear to only have 4 watches with blue dials. Then again, my collection seems like it's probably puny compared to some of you here. In order of acquisition: Seiko SNKK45 ("Seikonaut"): Seiko SNZH53: Grand Seiko SBGA375 (it's hard to coax the blue out of this one - it looks black most of the time - had to get in bright sunlight for this picture): Bulova Precisionist 96B257:
    7 points
  42. I've been away for a while and thought I'd ease myself back into the watch world but... ended up jumping in with both feet for this one- I've wanted one of these for ages and figured the market had passed me by but now I get to do the happy dance! Can't wait to get started on this one.
    7 points
  43. Yes, I too hate the h/spring stud screw. So easy to slip and wreck the hairspring, especially ladies watches!! In the past with the screw in-situ I have stripped a small piece of insulation off a suitably sized small electric wire, just a mm or 2, and slipped it on to the screw or screwdriver. This stops the screwdriver form slipping off, but means you have to rely on feel for it going into the screw slot. Can sometimes work to fit the screw as the insulation has enough friction to allow the screw to start. Otherwise I find a well dressed screwdriver just a bit wider than the the screw als
    6 points
  44. There is an old thread here that shows a YouTube vid of how to remove the EtaChron stud from the stud support, which I think is a bad idea, as there is too much downwards pressure on the stud support when using tweezers. It can be done that way, but isn't ideal, especially when working on a clone movement where the stud support isn't as strong as an ETA movement. I put a lesson together for my class at https://efhc.org.uk/wordpress/index.php/centre-facilities/ to show how to do it without risking damage to the stud support and how to save over £60 making your own tools to perform this tas
    6 points
  45. Battery and crystal change for 100% bio local produce. I'm happy, what do you think?
    6 points
  46. The lume binder holds the new pip in place.
    6 points
  47. It's friday night over here and what is better than having an small party with wine, chips and a small check. Just because it is ticking it might not be ready to be adjusted. Since this question is freqently occuring in different shapes I will just make a small guide which can help you decide if you done the minimal checks. Maybe it will avoid this beeing an 50 + page post There are some initial checks one can do while servicing a watch after the repair, here I use a ETA 2824-2 as an example. First of all, I assume you cleaned the movement properly. After and before cleaning alw
    6 points
×
×
  • Create New...