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  1. Valjoux / ETA 7751 Triple calendar moon-phase; This gold-plated Berney-Blondeau S.A. with an ETA 7751 belonged to a German gentleman who received it new on his 60th birthday in 1995. Through the years he kept the original box, the warranty card as well as the 1995 price-list and the dealer’s business card. He has worn the watch only on social accessions and the watch spent most of its time stored in a "Panzerschrank". According to the original price-list, the 1995 purchase price was 1450 CHF. As you can see, the watch held up pretty well, only a few small scratches in the front- and rear mineral-glass crystal and on the top of the lugs some of the gold-plating has worn through. The watch ran, all function did work. It had never been serviced nor opened Disclaimer; This walk-through is written in the way I do it. That's not to say it's the most correct way of doing things but as they say: there are many ways to Rome, all leading to the same result. Neither do I, as a hobbyist, have fancy horological equipment such as a cleaning machine or a "sterile" & "dust-free" room and therefor the end result will not be "Rolex"-standards. All I can say is that I'm always give it my best shot and I will mention problems encountered or were I went wrong, so you don't have to Without any further ado, let's dig into this beautiful & complicated watch ...... First make sure that you downloaded the latest ETA 7751 "Technical Communication". Throughout this walk-through I'll use the same parts reference numbers as used in the "Technical Communication". Below the currently latest September 2021 version; 7751 manual.pdf Before having done anything to the watch, I tested all the functions for proper working and took the timegrapher readings to see if there was anything which needed special attention. These readings can later be compared with the readings after the service. Dial-Up; Dial-Down; Crown-Right; Crown-Down; Crown-Left; Crown-Up; From the readings, it's clear to see that the watch needed a proper service. The back-lid, just like the front-crystals found on pocket-watches, required a knife-type case-opener. Checked out the oscillating weight ball-bearing, it had next to no play and therefor good for another round. Removed the oscillating weight (48). Removed the two casing-screws and clamps, pulled the stem and flipped the case over onto a soft pillow. With the watch-case removed, the winding stem re-inserted and the movement was placed in a proper 7750 (or family) movement-holder. To me, working on these movements a proper movement-holder is paramount. During the disassembly of the movement I encountered some problems and without this holder I most likely would have made scratches or worse..... Pulling the 8x hands; they all came off without any problems. All the hands safely nicely stored in a small plastic container. The same counts for the dial, after the removal directly stored in a plastic container with on both sides of the dial a soft lining. Removal of the Day & Month indicator disk (78) and the Moon phase indicator (79) The keen observer may have noticed that there are no screws next to the movement holder, for example the two screws holding the Day & Month indicator respectively. When working on complicated movements or movements which I'm not familiar with, I took on the habit, when possible, to replace the screws in the same hole as they came from. For sure, it's more work, but some movements do have multiple types/sizes screws and it will become a big puzzle if you store them in the same container / basket. Replacing the screws works (most of the time) very well for me, but in some cases the replaced screws shoulder-out deeper than as they would have done when holding the part above. The protruding screw may touch parts below or when replacing bridges, prevent the bridge from not seating fully "level". To me, replacing the screws thoughtfully is far simpler than facing a huge sorting puzzle later. Removal of the combined maintaining plate (76) and the Month star driving wheel (77). The three tiny screws holding the maintaining plate (76) were extremely tight. I couldn't loosen them with my standard (new) screwdriver bits so I had to grind the screwdriver bit to match the exact the same shape as the screw-grooves. Only then, with "force", they came loose and I was glad for having a proper movement-support! One slip of the screwdriver, with the force that was required, could / would have easily made a deep score in the plate or worse ........ Removal of the Day jumper spring (71), Day & Month jumper (70), Day jumper (72) and the Moon phase yoke (73) plus an early warning ! With those parts out of the way, the Moon phase platform (75) had to come off. Assuming that the with the arrow highlighted screw was one of the screws holding the platform down, I turned the screw only to discover that it was the moon-phase corrector eccentric ....... Oops !! The setting of the eccentric has to be checked at the end anyway, but now I know for sure that it's set wrongly. Removal of the Moon phase jumper (69), Corrector maintaining small plate (66) and the Moon phase jumper spring (67). Still in the picture the Date & Month jumper (74) which should have been removed before this picture was taken. The original stem was replaced by a longer stem to adjust the Calendar driving wheel (61) which was holding the Date-star (63) down. Removal of the Date-star (63, shown in the previous picture) together with the Date-corrector (65) and the corrector maintaining small plate (66). Removal of the calendar platform (62). Slowly back to familiar ground; a standard ETA 7750 starts to appear ... Removal of the Hour wheel 24hrs H1 (59), the Calendar driving wheel (61), the Hour-wheel (60), the Day corrector (58) and the Day corrector spring (57). The removal of the Hammer-spring (56), Set hour-hammer operating lever (53 & 54), Hour counter lock (55), Hour counting wheel (52), Minute-wheel (51) and the free Cannon pinion (50). Pulling of the Driving pinion (49) has to be done carefully; either with a pair of hand-levers or two small screw-drivers. The upwards force on either side of the pinion has to the equal or you may break the pinion of the great wheel (16) (a previous experience has taught me so !! ) Flip the movement over and from here on I'm using a Bergeon 4040 movement holder. First the removal of the Hammer-spring (45). When removing this spring I had up till now difficulties avoiding making a small mark in the Automatic device bridge (44). It was our WRT-member "Nickelsilver" who tipped me off using a piece of Scott tape over the edge of the bridge. This worked very well and for the first time I was able to remove the hammer without leaving a mark! Thanks Nickelsilver! The hammer-spring (45) and the Clutch-spring (47) removed. Remove the Auto device bridge (44). Removal of the Reversing wheel; (43), Reduction wheel (41), the Clutch (40), Oscillating pinion (39), the Hammer (42), Chronograph wheel (37), Minute-counting wheel (38), Minute-counting jumper (46), the Lock (33), the Operating-lever (36) and the Minute counting driving wheel (19). Removal of the Chronograph bridge (34), the Friction spring (32) and the Operating lever spring (35). After the removal of the Ratchet wheel driving wheel (33) it's time to release any residual power in the main-spring. This can be done by holding the crown, lift the Click-spring (20) and slowly release the tension by letting the crown slip through your fingers. Removal of the Chronograph cam (29), Cam jumper (28), Detent (30), Ratchet wheel (23), Crown wheel core (22) and Crown wheel (21). Removal of the Balance Assembly (26+27), Pallet bridge (25) and Pallet fork (24). Removal of the Barrel bridge (18). Removal of the power-train; the Great wheel (16), Third wheel (15), Second wheel (14), Escape wheel (13), the Movement barrel (12) and the Stop lever (17). Flip the movement over for disassembling the keyless works. Removal of the Setting lever jumper (11) together with the Intermediate setting wheel (10), the Time setting gear (9), Rocking bar (8), Yoke (6), Setting lever (5), Winding stem (4), Winding pinion (2), Sliding pinion (3) and the Yoke spring (7). All the parts safely stored in a compartmentalized box with lid, ready for cleaning & demagnetizing. Regarding the "wear & tear" of all the watch-parts; it was clear to see that the watch hadn't seen a lot of use. The Oscillating weight ball-bearing (48) was good, reversing wheel (43) looked good etc. However, I decided to change out the main-spring. This type of barrel has a lid which cannot be "pushed" open. To open the lid, I place a sharp knife in the groove between the barrel and the lid and while pressing down on the knife roll the barrel, in my case on a "soft" leather underground to avoid doing any damage. This widens the groove into a small gap and with the smallest screwdriver one can pry, going around the barrel, the lid off. When done carefully you won't leave any marks. Barrel & Arbor cleaned, braking-grease applied ready for the new spring. Apart from a few (see "technical communication" !) the parts were soaked for 24hrs in Zippo lighter fluid and pegged; all the sprockets, pivots and jewels. Thereafter all the parts were checked for magnetism. Instead of using the unreliable compass method, I'm using an App called "Lepsi" on my iPhone. This App doesn't tell you how much magnetism there is, it only indicates whether there is any. The distance of the object above the screen, by which magnetism is detected, gives you some indication of the strength of the magnetic field, but nothing more. For me, when magnetism is detected, that's enough reason to "Zap" that part on my no-nonsense self-build demagnetizer. Of course, in reality the demagnetizer is not placed anywhere near my iPhone or the other watch-parts / metal-objects like here on the photo. Also, it may be a good idea to take your watch off during the "zapping” operations! Quite a few parts, particularly in the calendar works, were magnetized. With the main-plate anti-shock Chaton cleaned, pegged, cap-stone oiled and re-installed in the main-plate (1), the assembly of the 7751 can begin. Escape wheel (13), Second-wheel (14), Third-wheel (15), Main-spring barrel (12), Great-wheel (16) and Stop-lever (17). Installation of the barrel-bridge (18) (by a 7750 the wheel-train the and barrel-bridge are combined in one bridge). Make sure that all the wheels turn fine before tightening the screws; check, check and double check. Again, if you using the re-installed screws method, some screws may protrude the bridge. (I took the "warning picture" below a little later, so don't look at any additional installed parts) All the Lubrications as per the ETA 7751 "Technical Communication". These two re-installed screws do protrude the Barrel bridge (18). The one on the left will touch the Great-wheel (16) and the one to the right may just touch the main-spring barrel (12). Back them out far enough so they don't cause any trouble. The installation of the Crown-wheel (21), Crown-wheel core (22) and the Ratchet-wheel (23). With the movement turned over, installation of the keyless works; Sliding-pinion (3), Winding pinion (2), Winding-stem (4), Setting-lever (5), Yoke-spring (7), Rocking-bar (8), Yoke (6) and placing of the Time setting gear (9) before placing the Intermediate setting wheel (10) and Setting lever jumper (11) as a "combination". Keyless work completed. Check for proper working! Installed the pallet-fork (24) and the complete balance assembly (26 & 27). Cleaned, pegged the balance Chaton and oiled the cap-stone. Before going any further with the assembling, I tested the power-train and escapement for any irregularities. On the timegrapher the readings were looking a whole lot better than initially. Instead of picturing each position, here are the readings; DU & DD both 292-294 degrees, 0 ms and 0 s/d. CU: 244, 0.1, -14 s/d CR: 249, 0.2, -16 s/d CD: 252, 0.1, -6s/d CL: 262, 0.0, -5 s/d Even though I adjusted the Etachron as good as I could, that's to say centring the hairspring between the two regulator pins and thereafter reducing the regulator pins gap to the point that the hairspring could still, but just "breath", the positional deviation with max. 16 seconds is slightly higher than I was hoping for. Then again, it's not a chronometer grade and each position produced straight lines, so I think that with some daily-rate adjustments the watch will run just fine. Once satisfied with the running of the power-train and the escapement, the assembly of the chronograph can start. Cam jumper (28), Chronograph cam (29), Detent (30), Minute counter driving wheel 30 minutes (19), Lock (33), Operating lever spring (35) and the Operating lever (36). As said; lubrication as per "Technical Communication" and test the proper function of the start/stop and reset levers. Placement of the Ratchet wheel driving wheel (31) and the Friction spring chronograph wheel (32). Install the chronograph bridge (34); don't forget the lubricate the Reversing wheel jewel on the bottom of the chronograph bridge before placement. Also pay attention to the reset-lever, it has to be pushed in so the bridge can sit level & flush. Check the working of the Ratchet driving wheel (31) and the reset lever before tightening the bridge screws. The placement of a well lubricated Reduction wheel (41), Minute counter jumper (46), Oscillation pinion (39, biggest sprocket down), seconds recording Chronograph wheel (37), Minute counting wheel (38), the Clutch (40), make sure that the oscillation pinion pivot is engaged), Reversing wheel (43) and finally the Hammer (42) before the Automatic device bridge (44). Before installing the Automatic device bridge (44), lubricate the jewel for the seconds recording Chronograph wheel underneath the bridge. The installation of the Automatic device bridge can be very tricky. It's very easy to touch the Clutch (40) and the pivot of the Oscillation pinion comes out. Before inserting or tightening the bridge screws, double-check the placing and working of every component!! Once the bridge is installed and with the relevant lubrication done, before mounting the hammer-spring (45) and the Clutch-spring (47), all the functions of the chronograph can be checked & tested; the engagement of the oscillation pinion, the smooth running of the seconds recording chronograph wheel, the advancing of the minute counting wheel, the start/stop- and reset-levers etc. Next is the installment of the Hammer-spring (45) and Clutch-spring (47). To prevent scratches on the Automatic device bridge (44), as per brilliant idea of WRT member "Nickelsilver", a piece of Scotts tape was taped over the edge of the bridge. With the installment of those two springs, the assembly of the chronograph is completed Movement flipped over and placed in the 775x movement holder. Installment of a well lubricated Driving pinion (49), The Cannon-pinion (50), the Minute wheel (51), Hour counting wheel (52), Set hour operating lever (53+54), Hour counter lock (55) the Hammer spring (56), the Day corrector spring (57) and the Day corrector (58). The build-up, up till the Day corrector spring (57) and the Day corrector (58), was identical as to a standard 7750. The Hour wheel 24hrs (59) drops over the Second wheel (14) pivot. Attention: Sadly, no picture but when installing the Hour wheel (60) over the Cannon pinion, one has to lift the Minute wheel (51) slightly and to make sure that the hour wheel teeth do engage in the small minute wheel sprocket. Once they engage, both wheels can be lowered in place. Finally, before installing the Calendar platform (62) the Calendar driving wheel (61) with the "day finger" pointing as shown. From here on I pulled the winding stem to stop the running of the movement and thereby avoiding the advancement / altering of the positions of the wheels. The installation of the Calendar platform (62) can be a bit tricky. It's all too easy to dislodge the hour lever (53) and the Hammer spring (56). Make sure that the platform sits flush with the Main plate (1) before tightening the 3x screws. Place the Day star (63) as shown in both above pictures. Placing of Date + Month jumper (70), the Day + Month jumper (74) (Both jumpers are identical), Day jumper (72), Moon phase yoke (73), Day jumper spring (71), Date corrector (65), Corrector maintaining small plate (66), Moon phase corrector (68), Moon phase jumper (69) and Moon phase jumper spring (67). Installation of the Moon phase platform (75), the Combined maintaining plate (76) (Be aware that the top of the Combined maintaining plate slides in the gap of the Day Star) and the placing of the Month star driving wheel (77). Placing the Month & Day indicator disk (78) and the Moon phase indicator (79). Adjusting the Phase corrector eccentric (64) wasn't that hard as I feared. By adjusting the eccentric one determines the "depth" of the Date corrector (65), shown by the blue arrows. Set too high and the top-sprocket of the Date corrector (65) won't even touch the Moon phase corrector (68). Set too deep the top-sprocket of the Date corrector will jam the Moon phase corrector (68) into the Moon phase indicator. The "depth" has to set such that the sprocket of the Date corrector (65) pushes the Moon phase corrector (68) just far enough so that it will just advance the Moon phase indicator by one click before the top Date corrector (65) sprocket releases the Moon phase corrector (68). There is clear information about the Moon phase corrector "depth" setting in the ETA 7751 "Technical Communication". With all parts installed and tested as far as possible, the dial goes back on. Before re-installing the hands, I re-lumed the minute & hour hand with new high-class LumiNova. Both hands now re-lumed and drying before the installation. Placing the long Date indicator hand required a bigger size hand-pusher which I didn't have. The idea was born to cut a tweezer protector-cap from the top until the required size was obtained. Stuck to protector cap onto the handle of a diamond file for more stability / pushing-power. It worked like a treat Turn the date quick-set until the month indicator disk changes month, that will be the first (1) day of the new month. The rest of the hands (8! in total) to be set at 24:00 midnight when the day indicator disk changes. Detailed instructions about the "shift tolerances" are described in the ETA 7751 "Technical Communication". All the hands installed and correctly set on the month / day / date and moon phase. The 18th of January 2022 had a full moon. The German gentleman received the watch when he turned 60 in 1995, now I'll continue with his watch as from my (65th ) birthday in January 2022 I'm still awaiting new crystals and once the case has been restored, I'll add the final picture of the fully restored/serviced watch. I really enjoyed working on this watch and even though I sometimes feel that contributing to this current WRT-forum has sadly become a bit of wasted time, I do hope that my write-up, perhaps found via Google or some other search machine, will be of some use to somebody, at some point in time Endeavor, Denmark
    15 points
  2. Thought I’d show off a watch project that I have been working on. Wanted to create vintage inspired watches. Tell me what you think so far!
    11 points
  3. I use the term "restoration" lightly. I did a full service, cleaned the case in an ultrasonic, and replaced the crystal. When I got the watch, it wasn't running, and now it is, so I'll take what I can get.
    10 points
  4. It’s far from perfect, but they play well together...
    10 points
  5. Hello fellow watch repairers, a few days before christmas I scrolled through a website for used stuff and came across an unbelievable offer for a vintage JLC Memovox for just under 1000€. It said that the dial was restored but for this price I just couldn’t say no to it, although I feared that it might be a scam. So on the twenty-third of December I drove four hours to pick it up, still with the feeling that it is to good to be true. But everything worked out well and I bought the watch what makes me the proud owner of my first JLC: And with a new strap it was a really lovely piece: At first everything worked well but after a few days the alarm wasn’t functioning anymore. Diagnosis: broken alarm mainspring. So I had to replace it and give the whole movement a service. The movement itself seemed to be in good condition and marks in the caseback showed that it was at least serviced a couple of times during its lifetime: Here a some impressions from the stripdown: And indeed the alarm mainspring was broken: I cleaned all the parts, replaced the spring and reassembled it. Now the alarm works flawlessly again, it is running nicely and is ready for its next life chapter. I never worked on such a valuable and complicated watch, so I‘m really happy that everything went well and that the watch is working again. I hope you enjoyed this short report!
    9 points
  6. Slow day at the office again today. So I practised some micro welding. I got this Bally's ladies watch for about $10. The caseback says Bulova but the movement says PUW 211O2T. The movement is in great condition but the battery clamp was broken. So I fashioned the broken part out of a flatten piece of stainless steel wire and micro tig welded it to the old battery clamp. Not the prettiest specimen but it works.
    9 points
  7. This is a guy I have been watching on Youtube. He has some very good and interesting videos to watch some are for those just starting out. Here is a a nice one from him about Tweezers. He has a very good one on watch oils and grease. I have subscribed to his channel and I hope you will do the same.
    9 points
  8. This Master Craft Mainspring Winder has been recommended and praised several times by @clockboy and I’m so happy that I, after several years of trying to acquire one, finally found a copy in very good condition on eBay. The Master Craft mainspring winder is surprisingly easy and convenient to use, and of the mainspring winder variants that I have tried so far, K&D 128, and Bergeon style winders, I must say that the Master Craft winder is the one that I now prefer with a good margin. Maybe a bit exaggerated, but I always dread and feel tense using my other mainspring winders, especially the K&D 128, but with the Master Craft I feel perfectly confident every time. It’s simply a joy to use and handle! There are several things with the Master Craft mainspring winder that I especially appreciate: The transparent discs of the winding arbors that make it so much easier to understand what is going on with the mainspring, both when you crank it in and especially when it’s to be detached from the winding arbor. The gauges that make it superfluous to measure the inside of the mainspring barrel. Instead, you can just try out which gauge best fits in the mainspring barrel and that’s it. That the mainspring can be transferred into the mainspring barrel from either side of the transfer plate to provide for right- or left-hand coiling. A nice feature too is that these transfer plates are coin edged making them easy to attach and detach from the holder. That the mainspring is so easy to crank into the transfer plate as the contact area between the mainspring and the transfer plate is so small. It almost feels as if the spring has lost 50 % of its tension. It also makes it quite easy to pull out the mainspring a bit from the transfer plate if you happen to crank it too far to get the bridle in. That it’s so easy to get the hook on the winding arbor to attach to the hole/eye in the inner coil of the mainspring. Using the suggested "method 1" in the user manual, I just push the winding arbor down in the inner coil of the mainspring while I crank it and the arbor hook automatically finds its way into the hole/eye in the mainspring. Conclusively, I must say that I’m super happy with this cleverly devised mainspring winder. It exceeded all that I was hoping for and was expecting! So much that I felt an obligation to write this post.
    8 points
  9. Someone had tried on a large Sector watch at the jeweler shop. Only later the owner found that the person managed (how?!?) to snap the stem in the little time he handled it, but didn't say anything. The crown is signed and of a peculiar look, of course Sector service center said that it's not available anymore. Then, somehow I botched on the correct way of removing a stem broken flush on the crown, that is to cut around the top of the female threaded section about 1mm to grab it. The sliding portion left for good and the fixed one was ruined. Time to think something different, all in all it took about two years until yesterday. All work was done an a non-watchmakers baby lathe with standard tools. An extremely useful one is the carburetor jets gauges below. These are now discontinued or sell for a stupid price but I had secured the pair from a German metrology seller. As the usual I apologize for the rough pictures. I started by drilling a blind hole in the original crown "core" to be the largest possible without touching the threads. Then cut off the button from a spare screwdown crown. That revealed the mistery of how the pipe, which holds the sliding portion and its spring, is attached to a screwdown crown. It's screwed in as well! But, once turned to press fit size into the hole of the original crown (3mm) there was not enough material to hold a firm friction fit. That I remedied turning and pressing in a brass sleeve. I left the contact surface a little rough to improve friction on the 0.05mm interference. I don't know why but most of my mechanical repairs involve sleeving and shimming. Then I turned a tube to push the above into the crown. It's sized so to be also used as a stump on the staking set. It went in without issue. Compressing air in there is not ideal, but once I realized it was too late to pull it out back and cut an escape groove. The finished item works fine on the case, all is left to do is to cut a new stem to size and return it to the happy jeweler.
    8 points
  10. I was allways fascinated by Gems, Minerals and Meteorites. Then there was a Video on Youtube about a Watch with a Meteorite-Dial. I want that too...... luckily i could buy a Meteorite-Dial with 31mm Diameter. But the way the Guy in this Video made it was not acceptable for me, i dont want to glue the Dial to the Movement and he did not use the Screws to fix the Movement to the Holder. So i bought Dial-Feets and glued them to the Dial, for this i made a Fixture to get the exact Position for the Dial-Feets. So far so good, but the Dial was not flush with the Spacer (Werkhaltering) of the Movement and the Heigth of the Stem was not exactly in line with the Case with a Clone of 2824 / ST2130, but it did run.......for two Days. Time to do it again, but better. I had to mill Pockets for the Dial-Feets about 0.14mm deep and glued them again, now they are flush. I used a Clone 2826/ST2100 and the Stem fits now ok. And some Pictures of the Dial, the Fixture (with Teflon Sheet), the Fixture with the Parts to put Pressure to the Dial (for the Glue), the Dial with the Feets and the finished Watch, bottom and Top. I hope you like it Ernst
    8 points
  11. Some of my recent repairs to non-runners that are now happy again. 1963 Mercury - water ingress damaged the dial so I cleaned it up and coated with a Sharpie. 1968 Marlin - found the date detent spring was curved and causing the day of the month not to align in the dial window. 1970 Marlin - this was missing the case back, movement spacer and the hair spring was bent. It was also very dusty inside since the case was exposed. I replaced the balance wheel assembly form a M31 automatic. Have to love the interchange parts Timex used! All were cleaned, polished, movements serviced as outlined in the Timex Service Manual.
    8 points
  12. My Timex Waterbury 2018 backlight was intermittent from new. This was a 60th birthday present which I really appreciated so I didn't want to try and return it in the heat of the Pandemic. After about a month the Idiglo stopped working altogether even though the watch keeps excellent time. The illumination itself was working fine when it worked at all. The problem was that pushing the watch crown inwards to activate the light seemed at fault. Towards the end I found I had to pull the crown out slightly and then press to get the light to come on. This ran the risk of accidentally changing the position of the hands which meant I couldn't trust the time afterwards. It was getting annoying! Following advice in the forums I used a stout bladed knife and popped the back off by lifting the tabbed part against the nearest lug. Replacing the back was going to be very tough but more on that later. The scratches on the crystal look terrible in this picture but it's hardly noticeable in reality. The fault did appear to be with the on/off switch mechanism so that's what I went looking for. When you press on the crown the sprung lever should be pressed against the gold plated electrical contact and complete the circuit for the light. The spring then returns the crown, the circuit is broken and the light goes off again. Ok so cool. I know how it is supposed to work now but it's so simple, how can it not be working? To make matters worse it did work absolutely perfectly with the back off! So I figured that I had mended it and put the back cover back on. This was VERY HARD. I couldn't press the thing hard enough to make it snap back and all that happened was that the cover 'see-sawed' around and I started to worry that I would damage it. So in the end I pushed the cover as far into position as I could and then clamped it between two pieces of wood in a table vice. Protecting it with layers of paper towel I gradually increased the pressure - fully expecting to crush the crystal - until it popped back on. I'd been very careful to clean the surfaces around the seal and replace the rubber gasket without any twists that might compromise the water resistance. But the backlight was still faulty. Exactly the same. I guess the stem was touching the lever while the back and retaining parts were removed. I took the back off again and decided to go a bit further this time. The stem was removed very easily by pressing the little locking tab. I don't have a picture of it happening but when I was handling the case to get the stem out a tiny, tiny circlip fell out as well. About 1.75mm diameter. I'd never seen one of these things so small! Here's a picture of it close to the groove it should be clipped into. I know that holding it with a magnetic pick could risk magnetising it but I tried tweezers and immediately realised that the tiny thing would go flying into orbit and be lost forever. How am I supposed to get the circlip into the groove without it disappearing across the room? The answer was Blu-Tack. I pressed the circlip into it with the open part upwards and then pressed the watch stem down on to it until it clicked in. Result!! And that was it. I replaced the stem and did the scary vice thing again to replace the back and it was done. Good result! Considering how many Indiglos have been sold around the world I was surprised that there was just nothing like this on the internet so I'm posting to help others in the future. It was pretty easy to do once I knew what was needed. But it was also VERY fiddly and you really should be aware that losing the circlip or crushing a watch in a vice are likely to void your warranty! See you out there, Moo
    8 points
  13. Disassembly sequence here (Please sort by name in ascending order) Assembly sequence here (Please sort by name in ascending order) The watch is an Enicar Star Jewels Ocean Pearl from the 1970s A bit of background I bought this watch on tradera.com (Swedish eBay) listed in the category "Klockor/Renoveringsobjekt" ("Watches / Renovation items"). It was listed as "working" despite lacking the winding stem. I bought it for three reasons. I wanted to try my hands on an inexpensive watch in visual need of renovation. I was curious of the Enicar brand and their in-house movements, and I thought the blue dial with its applied indices had potential. It was clear that the watch needed a new winding stem, crown, and armoured crystal. I found an original stem on eBay from Spain for less than €10 including shipping (a bit of a bargain I think). I bought a bunch of inexpensive waterproof crowns from CousinsUK.com so that I could select the most comfortable and at least somewhat nice looking. I also bought a couple of inexpensive Sternkreutz armoured glasses from CousinsUK.com Overall the movement looked pretty OK except for a third wheel pivot that was rusty. Removing the rust (using vinegar essence) the pivot became Coca Cola bottle shaped so I burnished it and in the process had to remove approx. 2 to 3/100 mm. This in turn created too much side-shake so I replaced the jewel as well. The mainspring looked pretty OK too so I kept it. The cannon pinion also needed a bit of tightening. I guess the friction between the centre wheel arbor and the cannon pinion really can't last forever when a watch is being used for many, many years, perhaps even for decades (looking at the case back of this watch it has seen massive use). Anyway, to tighten the cannon pinion I first tried with my Seitz jewelling pusher and stake for lanterning cannon pinions, but it feels like the edges of the pusher and stake are somehow too blunt or perhaps not designed for wrist watch movements?! So, I resorted to my cannon pinion tightening tool (Bergeon 4733) which is really a bit scary to use but works very well once you've destroyed your first two or three cannon pinions learning how to use it. The trick is not to alter the position of the screw (unscrew it) once it reaches the inside of the handle. As soon as the screw touches the inside of the handle it's time to press. That will usually tighten the cannon pinion the required 1-3/100 mm (I would guess). To give back some of the luster to the dial and hands I simply used a Dial & Hand Cleaning Pen from CousinsUK.com. It worked better than I had expected. The old lume was partly missing and what was left was completely crusty so I simply scratched the remains off and didn't bother to replace it (the blue colour shining through the hands looked pretty great and I don't care much for lume anyway) Despite throwing everything in my arsenal of collected knowledge and experience on the this watch I couldn't get it to run perfectly. The amplitude (as well as the rate) in the horizontal positions fluctuates between 260 and 280 degrees but mostly stays around 260 degrees. I did adjust the curb pin as the hairspring was pinched between the boot and the curb pin and made sure it bounced evenly between the two, but the effect was only marginal. I suspect that the hairspring touches the lower part of the boot. Anyway, I decided to wait with further investigations, put it together, wear it and enjoy it. Despite this shortcoming it performs very well as a daily wearer, only varying in rate between about +1 and -1 seconds per day.
    7 points
  14. Updating to THIRD Vulcain Cricket (Sensilarm) done except for the sweep second hand. To bring this one to life I had to: 1) new staff 2) turned a new pusher 3) replaced keyless works (clutch and winding pinion, crown gear, setting lever and setting lever screw) 4) sweep second pinion I am now in the hunt for a sweep second hand. I put a lot of money into this thing...I think...it has been going on for about nine months. Bought parts on ebay, NOS material houses, donor watch, and I made the pusher.
    7 points
  15. Holiday present to myself. I ordered an ETA 2824-2 elabore movement, PVD coated stainless case with sapphire crystals, dial and hands from a watch materials supplier in Switzerland. None of this stuff was cheap, but the seller guarantees that all the parts are Swiss made and I don't have any reason to believe the items are not genuine. The strap is made in China, but I don't believe in spending big money on 'designer' leather straps. So what do you folks think?
    7 points
  16. I have fixed several watches for my neighbors and advertised to other friends that I would fix their watches--for free. So...it has been fun. Those who get their watch back in perfect working order love me and have promised to attend my funeral (as far as I know I am not about to die--but only God knows). Well, this developed beyond my expectation. My neighbor contacted all of her friends, law enforcement, customers, other neighbors, friends (neighbor is a Lt. in the local Sheriff department). So in order to feed my insatiable desire to fix things of horology (although one friend asked if I could fix an ancient typewriter), she gathered a pile of timing pieces to be fixed. I received them this evening as a Christmas gift. Each piece with an attached email address so that I can communicate with the owner. They have been informed that when their item is fixed, they must come to my little watch shop to pick it up. LOL...I love it. I have not counted, but I would guess about twenty watches and maybe eight clocks. I love this journey I am on, and I love to see the joy I bring when someone gets their time piece running. There are no watchmakers in the area, so people just give up on their time piece. So, I am now buried in work. And...I know already...I will not be able to accomplish this work without the wisdom of my friends on this forum, so I thank you in advance!!!
    7 points
  17. Thinking about a perfect finish here's an interesting PDF to read. A Quick Evaluation of Surface Finish of Pivots.pdf
    7 points
  18. Recent acquisition.....
    7 points
  19. I haven't done one of these for a while..... My latest acquisition with a Record 107 movement, and on my first attempt at making a strap (no apologies for the dodgy stitching). Came in as a non-runner, turned out to be a broken M/S so easily sorted. I was tempted to have a go at re-plating the case but I think it carries off the brassing rather well.
    7 points
  20. I think we have become overly OCD about beat error. Before the invention of timegraphers, what did watchmakers do? They just line up the balance jewel with the pallet fork by sight and that was it. I think the error could be out by 1.0ms.
    7 points
  21. Bulova Seaking Automatic from 1975 I believe. Just restored and serviced this for my next door neighbour. It's 'on test' for the next day. He told me he got it for his tenth wedding anniversary and has been in a drawer for 25 years or so. Going to give it back to him tomorrow evening. I hope he will be pleased to wear it again.
    7 points
  22. This 1956 Bulova has spent quite a bit of time in the above condition and fought tooth and nail during it's disassembly. Several components needed to be completely desolved to facilitate it's improvement. I tried ice machine cleaner but found it somewhat aggressive. After the first cleaning, I had intended to reuse all of these parts including the mainspring only suggested at in the lower right corner. After a second look it was determined that the balance spring would not be reusable. Several components would need to be replace, including a wheel that never got into the above picture. This was the first round of components chosen, the damaged balancecock was selected mearly for the screw it contained and then discarded. Others would need to be found. After pouring over loose wheels for several hours and test fitting for each position, I dropped in a balance wheel just for a test run. This balance is out of round and will need to be trued or I will pull the staff out for installation into the original wheel. I have not found a regulator yet but it is running. I would have liked to reuse a higher percentage of original parts but they were just to far gone. Arguably it's in better shape than when I found it. Thanks for looking. Shane 1337923888_VID_20210828_1830034.mp4
    7 points
  23. This is a fascinating conversation here... Pedro (not picking on you, just exploring your perspective as the asserter) is describing a frictionless market with perfect access to, willingness/ability to find, and willingness/ability to understand information. Additionally, Pedro is assuming people necessarily care that they might be flushing some value in the interest of time saved or ease. My parents are well to do, and my mother couldn't be bothered with something like a garage sale. She just drops everything she doesn't want off at Goodwill or what have you. I've seen her dump many many thousands of dollars worth of goods without the slightest care what they might be worth or any forgone revenue. The time spent figuring out what something is worth and dealing with it just isn't worth the value potentially gained to her. She has no desire to understand what something might be worth. To Pedro's point, buying a watch for even a dollar is infinitely greater than she would have otherwise received. Additionally, I think there may be a cultural misunderstanding of what a garage sale is in the US... I don't know what a boot sale is, though as a car guy, I can infer that someone is selling something out of the trunk of their car. However, it has no further meaning to me, and I've never witnessed any such thing that didn't involve frozen meat, fireworks, or tamales at a construction site. A garage sale is NOT how poor people make money. If anything, it's the opposite. It's a way for people to unload massive quantities of junk they no longer want as a result of spring cleaning, or a pending move or something. Poor people come from miles around to buy things super cheap. My maternal grandmother was an horrific hoarder, and would troll garage sales like it was her job because she could buy things for pennies on the dollar. A decent TV will be $15 or something like that. A couch might be $20. If someone wanted to put in the effort to actually extract some sort of market value from these things, they wouldn't be having a garage sale. There are instances and people who will research things, and put more... well... educated isn't the right word... sort of educated in the "know enough to be dangerous" sense of the concept... They'll search online for something, find something similar or an outstanding example of the same selling for a mint, and think their... '72 Super Beetle with a seized engine and rust to the windows is worth $50K and a night with the buyer's spouse because they saw a '53 museum quality example sell at some auction for around that. In reality it'll cost a few hundred to have it hauled off for low grade scrap metal. As a more easily relatable example of this, early in the pandemic, someone nearby had a garage sale, and my neighbor went to check it out. They had most of an L&R watch cleaning machine somehow. Since they didn't know what it was to begin with, they googled it, found the cost of... some really expensive version I guess, and decided it was worth a few grand. I believe everything that wasn't attached to the base was missing (or misidentified and tossed), and it had lived at least some years outdoors. It MIGHT have made a noise or something when turned on, but there was no way it was usable without a lot of time and money invested. Not a few $K, and probably not even a few hundred. When my neighbor showed me a photo and told me what they were asking, I didn't even bother going down there. On the flip side, pedro's take comes from a more ethical perspective. Let's explore that a bit... My preferred ethical paradigm is Deontology. For simplicity, this particular conversation would boil down to "would the outcome be positive if everyone did this?". If everyone had a giant pile of stuff, some of it may or may not be worth actual money, and everyone else went around asking about specific items in each others' piles, and occasionally these items were worth more or less than one party realizes, would the outcome be positive or negative to society? I think the answer is that it's neutral. Everyone has their domains where they know a lot about some things, and not much about others. If I know that a particular computer keyboard is worth a ton of money, but don't recognize the name on the dial of a watch, I'll be able to pick computer peripherals up for free all day long, but I'll lose out on the watch. In the end, things sorta wash out at the societal level. If I try to take the harshest view, and assume that the seller in these scenarios full of market friction are losing out, we can't ignore that they're winning elsewhere. Not all transactions are of equal value, but the lower value transactions occur with far greater frequency across a much wider variety of goods... That's not to say there won't be imbalances at the micro level, but I'm not sure that can fully be attributed to the shortcomings of the question at play here... Now, if someone asks if that Speedmaster is worth anything, and you say, "Nah, but I'll give you $5."... That's a different story entirely.
    7 points
  24. $5 each at a yard sale today. The Omega has a 625 in it. Both are running.
    7 points
  25. Hello all. I recently posted a video on my youtube channel showing the process I use to make pivot drills. I hope its helpful. Comments and critiques welcomed.
    7 points
  26. A dip in the ultrasonic bath, some lubrication, a new crystal and a pimpt up bracelet and it’s back to it’s 60’s bling bling shape. Not bad for a few dollars more, even Clint Eastwood would agree
    7 points
  27. This is a great tool for the watchmaker when he wants to replicate a part, or even the watch repair man sometimes needs to make a new bridge. The tool is used to transfer the hole positions from the part you want to replicate. Usually, it is fastened into a wise in the square part you can see in the picture, but here I just show you what it does. On the tool you got two snuggly fitted rods which is pointy in the both ends; these has to be exactly centered with each other. I mostly use a nickelsilver alloy when doing the parts since you get a much nicer finish to the parts. I glue the part which holes I want to replicate in the plate of nicklesilver. One have to super glue the part into place on the plate. It will come of in a bath of acetone later on. Next I adjust the center jewel hole in the main plate with the upper rod (so you can see better). With the rod below I gently push and twist so it makes a mark in the plate. I just do one for this example. In real life you just continue to mark out the rest of the holes you want to drill. Here is the result from this operation. So now I take the drills out, I measure the hole diameter in the mainplate and choose one slightly smaller, don’t take the same size incase the hole you drill comes slightly out of center. You might need some room to adjust it later. In this case I use an olden goldie drill press too. On this drill press you also got a rod which is pointy on one side and has a small indent on the other. With the three fasteners you center the bit into position by using the pointy part of the rod in the drill press. Here you can see the part centered to the indent with the pointy rod. When the part is in place you put the drill into the drill holder part, this is pointy on the upper side so now you turn the rod around in the drill press. As you see the drill is centered in the dent you made with the upright tool. So now you just drill away with the bow (which I can’t find right now) Hope you got an idea of what to do with the tool, feel a bit sorry we hi-jacked JD's post a bit but it is such an interresting subject
    7 points
  28. The other week I went to visit a friend at their shop and they had in for repair the nicest electromechanical slave clock I have ever seen. It would of been originally installed in a very large area and the dial was about 2 foot across with a lovely wood and brass case. I was told that the owner wanted it cleaned and serviced and made to run, but he did not have a master clock for it. I suggested an Arduino with a real time clock module and a relay board should do the job as it only needed a pulse every 30 seconds. This weekend I was up in my loft and noticed my 'parts' Synchronome clock. I picked it up a few years ago and the only original part to it is the slave dial mechanism (1909 to 1918) model and the pendulum, everything else is not original (including the dial) and someone had tried to make it work by using a break beam sensor and home wound electromagnets to give it it's impulse. I bought it for the price of a beer as the pendulum rod and weight was worth it alone. I decided to remove the slave dial and make myself an Arduino Synchronome. The mechanism was filthy so was given a good clean. For those familiar with these clocks also note that someone had replaced the coil with a newer one. The resistance of the new coil was 45 ohms whilst the original one would of been around 2.5 ohms, so all my notes on what current to use to run the clock were useless. After cleaning and replacing the sheet of paper that is on the active surface of the armature I had to spend a lot of time tweaking the placement of the coil to get it to operate correctly as it was slightly too wide. Once that was sorted through trial and error I worked out that around 6.5 to 7V gave reliable operation of the clock, then it was on to the programming. After about an hour of struggling to get the program to work correctly I called my 14 year old son who then in about 3 minutes wrote me the code that would get the time from the Real Time Clock module (RTC) and then just looking at the seconds at 00 and 30 seconds it would send a 40 millisecond pulse to the relay. The clock is now happily ticking every 30 seconds on my bench. I still need to fit a 450 ohm resistor across the coil to stop arcing on the relay contact but will sort that out tomorrow. Then it will be time to move the cct off the breadboard onto something more permanent and sort out a dedicated supply for it rather than my bench supply. Please ignore the mess on my bench. I'm in the process of restoring a late 1930s and a late 1950s bicycle, both made in Australia.
    7 points
  29. 1970 Seiko 5606-7000 with hand made stamp dial. Running at 0 SPD and amplitude over 300 degrees at full wind.
    6 points
  30. Testing using Adsense at the moment. the forum is currently costing me IRO £250/mth to run now and the last payment from eBay ads was £77 so as you can see it’s making a significant dent in my back pocket you might ask why £250 when you can get cheap hosting accounts anywhere. Tried that last month. Disaster (you may have noticed performance issues and outages for a day or two). Moved back to a cloud system. Currently we are at 50gig of user uploaded data (images and such), this is backed up on Amazon cloud and Digital Ocean Cloud for failover and I have to pay for an 80 GB NVME SSD storage plan to get the performance we need. and as well as that the system sends almost 50,000 email notifications per month - for this I have to use a separate transactional email service. Bandwidth is not too bad as I use a lot of caching. but it all adds up unfortunately. I can’t afford to keep paying this every month. adsense has been a little encouraging. The past two days it made £4.50. So if that and eBay ads pan out then I will be able to comfortably continue with the project. I am also looking at making a theme for moderators and paying members where ads will not be served. Hopefully have this done in the next couple of days
    6 points
  31. Here is my latest ebay acquisition. A Waltham Colonial pocket watch. This one was in pretty good nick. I disassembled, cleaned and oiled. No broken parts on this one.
    6 points
  32. This curious little ladies pendant watch was manufactured long before transparent Swatches arrived on the scent. I'm going to guess this is from the late 1950s or early 1960s, but it is difficult to tell, as the caliber looks older, perhaps 1940s. There is quite a lot of wear on the acrylic and the plating, and since it is not shock protected, there is a pretty high chance the balance pivots may be damaged, but even if it proves unrepairable it is still quite an interesting piece.
    6 points
  33. Check for train freedom with fork out Check the pallet fork snaps back and forth cleanly with balance out Check that balance oscillates freely with fork out Check that balance endshake is correct (as well as fork and other endshakes) Check that hairspring is level and centered If you do that last check you will see that your hairspring is sitting on top of the center wheel. Once you correct that, note that the lift angle for this piece is 42 degrees, not 52.
    6 points
  34. Thought it may be worth to share; I received a pretty beaten up, none-running 1890-1900 cylinder-escapement pocket-watch. It had all sorts of problems, a list too long to go into details. Among those problems was a bend/broken minute hand. It inevitably broke off when trying to straighten it. The center-hole diameter of the minute-hand was 0.5mm and the length was 15mm. The hour-hand had a hole diameter of 2.0mm and the length was 10mm. Searching the internet to find an identical set proofed futile. The watch is a heirloom so originality was a priority. The hands turned out the be made of bronze, a copper-tin alloy. Therefor it made sense to attempt soldering but the part that had to be soldered had a thickness of only 0.3mm. Both parts had to be fixed in place with a sort of clamp capable to fixing both parts, being heat resistant and "none-sticking". A soldering iron, even with the smallest tip, would be far too big for the job and to avoid touching the parts, I choose to use a hot-air gun used in electronics for soldering SMD-components to a circuit-board. A few test were made which tin to use and at which temperatures. 300 degrees C with tin used in electronics seemed to work fast and made the tin to flow nicely. I used a soldering flux-paste. The clamp consisted of two metal rails, slightly diverting from each other to give many clamping options, bolted on a plate of gypsum. Pulling over a #1000 grid sand paper, I made two 45 degrees chamfered edges on either end of both parts; The two parts were clamped in; Applied some soldering flux, heated it all up to 300 deg.C and applied a tiny bit of tin. Once cooled down, I removed some excess tin with a small diamond file. Here a picture of the back side of the minute-hand; And here the front; the tin didn't flow further away from the soldered joint or around the edges Most likely not the strongest repair in the world, but when not touched it should be strong enough to do the job. On the picture the hand color looks black, but that's due to the lighting. In reality the hand hasn't lost any of its shiny patina at the front ...... Anyway, I thought to share this repair as one of the many different possibilities
    6 points
  35. Finally the new crystals (back and front) arrived so I could finish the watch, complimented with a new Ostrich leather strap. Project done
    6 points
  36. I have just serviced this Swiss made golf scorer. The main interest to a watchman is that the reset of the scores is done by turning the crown a full circle and each score is reset by the 'hammer' labelled A in exactly the same way as the second and minute hand flyback resets of a chronograph.
    6 points
  37. Random thought I assume you demagnetized it? The nice thing about the graphical display is the meaning hasn't changed since the first machine spit out paper. Although some of the timing machine manuals you wonder about the mental state of the people who Were interpreting the results. The one I'm attaching is pretty straightforward. Then I snipped out an image of what it probably is. Then unless you verified the lift angle your lift angle is probably wrong. But that's not going to change the graphical display output only the amplitude. Timing-Machine-Charts.PDF
    6 points
  38. Hello All Members I should like to extend to you Old and New A VERY MERRY CHRISTMAS and a HAPPY NEW YEAR and continued enyoyment in the horoligical journey. Enjoy the season and the coming year The Watch Weasol
    6 points
  39. Hey friends. I'm posting this not really to show case, but to say thank you to everyone of you who gave me tips and help to finally achieve this. As I mentioned in my very first post, introducing myself, this summer I purchased 3 of watches in a jumble sale. This is one of those 3 watches, fully serviced and restored with the skills I learnt from Mark's courses and this forum. It is named Kowal Ancre, I think it was a Spanish company that bought the name from a old Swiss company, it mounts an As2066 movement. Noting more to add but some pictures. Again, thanks a lot. @Mark @jdm @Plato @Marc @HectorLooi
    6 points
  40. Thought you might be interested in this.... A few of the causalities. All done
    6 points
  41. Not all watches with flat spring have the distinctive "dog leg" from the terminal curve to the hair spring body. This one looks OK to me, maybe needs a little bit of centering, but I think it's otherwise original and correct.
    6 points
  42. Hi all, I have uploaded a pdf copy of the Generale Ressorts catalogue. So that you can make yourself a hard copy. Handy to have in the drawer. (sometimes!). Even the pdf seems to be hard to find. Cheers Graziano. GeneraleRessorts.pdf
    6 points
  43. Well... That took forever... I have very very bad internet (<.5 mbps on a good day and very unstable to boot), so I don't like to upload photos very often. We're having some work done on the house in preparation for winter, and my wife took the baby away to not be around potentially infectious strangers, so I have the whole half meg to myself! Over the last few months, I've managed to score enough 404 wins that I haven't been able to find a gap when there wasn't something en route since the last photo I posted! I obviously have a type: All stainless, fully jeweled, European movements. I've taken a stab here at a Russian and Indian movement, and will probably try to find a Chinese one just to round it out (I've got Japanese covered already). Being a little picky keeps me from drowning in the things, and hopefully gives me a shot at making a few bucks on these when and if I ever get around to putting some finished ones up for sale! Here's the whole lot since that red jump hour a month or two ago. Ignore the Slava. I thought it was 404, but I stretched for it, and the photo is already uploaded. Everything is flipped, and otherwise in the same orientation. Ditto, now open. HMT. A little corrosion on the ratchet wheel, but otherwise this is the cleanest watch I've come across superficially. Technically, I cheated a little, and won the auction at $9.50, but that included free shipping, so I'm counting it anyway. If this one regulates out OK, I may not mess with it much. If this Clinton cleans up OK, this might be a handsome enough watch to hold onto, at least for a while. I'm a sucker for cushiony cases, and I need something a bit dressier than my daily driver for those occasions. This is an interesting one... "Garuda" is the name on the dial, but it has the Seiko "5" logo. Came out of China, which may explain the pretty obvious trademark infringement. From what I was able to find while no one was outbidding me, the brand used everything from jewelless pin levers up to mid-level Swiss movements. I took a gamble on it as there were no movement photos in the listing, but 21 jewels and an all stainless case seemed promising. That said, the movement is supposed to be 21 Jewels, but it looks like the cap jewel plate is missing so I may have been ripped off for some jewels. It's possible I have another watch somewhere with the same movement that I can salvage from if need be. Also, I can't see the escape wheel, but the balance is real chintzy looking, and it might be a pin lever escapement. The crystal has some interesting faceting as well, but I'm just going to replace it and not really spend any time trying to polish it up or find a matching one. Interesting watch. I think it's the only one of the whole lot that doesn't run at least briefly. Full disclosure, this one is not technically a 404, but the photos are uploaded... I've wanted to fiddle with one of these double mainspring high jewel Russian movements for a while, but I can't stand plated brass cases that every. Russian. Watch. Ever. is cased in. This is an export model, and is either in really good shape, or all stainless. Big modern size too. This one is a Frankenwatch... The case back says it's all stainless, but upon receipt I discovered that the case is actually plated brass. Formerly plated in a number of places as well. Lame... No bid deal though, because 404 and.... This guy has a pretty rough looking movement, but is actually stainless! I might just swap the Canoe movement and dial over, and have a decent enough watch in the end after all. And, because it's 404, no sweat! Last and probably least is this guy. All stainless and fully jeweled, so it's got that going for it. Handsome enough as well. I don't think it runs for more than a few seconds, and I'm not sure what's going on with the movement/dial. The dial is loose and turned a few degrees. It was straight in the listing, but arrived askew. At least it's not glued in place or something. Also, I think the movement is also loose in the case despite the spacer. Probably another frankenwatch, but won't know until I get into it. If the dial feet are broken off, there's not much I'll be able to do immediately. I might have a movement spacer, but it might go into the parts tray. So that's what I've been up to lately. I often only have an hour or two in the evening to screw around, and trolling eBay every few days for 404 fodder is a great way to while away an evening. Almost as great as reviving them!
    6 points
  44. Perhaps I should qualify that remark. While it is arguably true that with great power comes great responsibility, there is little to suggest in the recent history of mankind that those who consider themselves entitled to wield such power are ever given to consider those who have little or no access to such power. That applies as much to the fiscally wealthy and their power to lord it over the rest of us, as it does to the rest of humankind and there general disregard for the health and well being of the planet around them. The noblesse, without the oblige if you will.
    6 points
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