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  1. Thank you for clearing that up.
    4 points
  2. Very Rare "Mystery Dial" battery powered and never needs winding. Only 3 easy payment of $19.99 but wait there is more! figured it was time to decompress
    4 points
  3. Yeah, I've tried a few things: brass scarf, powdered marble, brass plates, etc. If I've learned anything about bluing steel, is that what works well for one person won't necessarily work for another person. I'm able to consistently and cleanly blue hands, but the much larger surface area of the chapter ring is a significantly greater challenge. If anyone wants to learn how to blue hands or screws, the most foolproof and consistent method I'd recommend would be to use an inexpensive (<$100) precision-controlled digital soldering station with some sort of brass heating platform attached.
    4 points
  4. Introducing anything magnetic into the work space when repairing watches is a no no I cannot see where it would be useful to have such a mat in watch repair. The only magnet I have is for those unfortunate times when a part does ping off into the distance I do a sweep of the floor with a magnet finds the part 99% of the time. Now if your a big tea drinker I have a Chocolate teapot for sale somewhere.
    4 points
  5. This watch was the score of the decade for me. I always liked the Tudor “snowflake” hands and block markers better than the 5513 Rolex for sure. This gem was an eBay score. I checked it over carefully- the crown was worn; crystal was horrible; bezel didn’t rotate. It was sold “head only” and was scarring a lot of buyers away. I grabbed it for a very good price. Not Y2K good price (when these were trading VERY cheaply) but for the time, well below average. Based on what I could confirm as genuine, I would break even as a parts mule. Got it home and popped the hood- Tudor marked 2784.
    3 points
  6. Is it available with an exhibition back?
    3 points
  7. Quick snapshot of a vibrant-to-the-point-of-garish completed watch. I'm likely to keep this one. Again, forgive the photo quality -- I've got a bunch of stuff lined up to shoot better this weekend.
    3 points
  8. out of curiosity why did you replace the entire setting? normally the above answer would be fine except this is a Rolex watch. Rolex is obsessed with end shake so often times they will have procedures to make that adjustment easily especially on the balance bridge. rather than explaining the procedure I'm attaching a section out of the manual. You'll notice there's a screw specific for adjusting the end shake. If somebody had zero idea what that screw was for an rotated it that would be the problem.
    3 points
  9. Cock screw is the one that holds the cock down on mainplate, in cases you suspect end stones might be pushing on pivot end( no or very little end shake) you can releive such possible pressure on end stones by loosening the said screw, if the are no end stones, the jewel itself can be pushing on shoulder seat of the pivot. Shelac is the stuff that acts like glue but wont hurt the base metal over time, it is used on fork pallets jewels to keep them from moving in fork slot, nearly all petrolium base cleaning solutions dissolve shelac rendering pallet jewels loose to move in the fork slot, w
    3 points
  10. Hi Mike I used the same stuff (typeclean) when servicing typewriters may years ago for cleaning the type heads once it was used up and dirty it went in the bin. The old stuff from using on watches can be reused for holding parts on the bench when measuring or other like tasks but the bin is where it usually ends up. Premium Rodico is likly to be an altered formula designed to remove money from your pocket it will be a bit more tacky so it collects more dollars/pounds .
    3 points
  11. The other day I was thinking about when I was a watchmaker and I was having problems with my posture and my neck. I was diagnosed with very sever spondylitis and was told the wear in the bones in my neck come close to someone in there 70’s I was only in my early 30’s at the time. My neck would lock and I was unable to move my head. The bones would rub each other because in some of my vertebral cartilage was none existent this also caused bad headaches and tightening of the muscles in my neck, it felt like my head was about to fall off. I had a Therapeutic counselor come around and have a look
    2 points
  12. Keeping with the spirit of this community, I'm not going to discuss any business stuff here. I've shared my photos and notes 'cause I hope they inspire someone else to try to do something cool and creative with watches, and I hope my progress notes will help.
    2 points
  13. Sorry yes you are correct. I was looking at the one in the link I posted. Looks like I'm going to have one of those days.
    2 points
  14. This is the Solar movement
    2 points
  15. The fact that it's clear is clear, but why it's clear isn't clear.
    2 points
  16. Looks fine to me. What's the problem? Ah, sorry. Looked again. Remove all the hands, Put the hour hand on, adjust it to the hour marker. Put the minute hand on, and turn both through a 12 hour cycle to check alignment and clearance. You might need a few attempts to get it perfect. Then put on the seconds hand.
    2 points
  17. And an UV light when looking for jewels.
    2 points
  18. 2 points
  19. Could you inject tinted clear acrylic into the inclusions, or fill with some other material. This might allow you to then slice it without loss of structure.
    2 points
  20. These blue boxes usually work fine, if the tweezers are still magnetized try again. Remember to put the tweezers over the tool and hold the red button pressed while you slowly move the tweezers away from the tool, at least one meter. Then you can release the button and test again if it worked.
    2 points
  21. Okay I really need one of you to start a company where I can just call you up and tell you all the watch parts I need and you run around like an idiot and try to find them. Let me know when your new company is up and running please. I have a long list.
    2 points
  22. Use an endmil rather than a drill bit. Still go slower than normal for the diameter. Normal would be quite fast (around 1000 rpm I guess) but I’d probably go at 200 or so to avoid heat buildup.
    2 points
  23. 2 points
  24. Drilling the center hole try using a smaller pilot drill first, also try a piece of masking tape over the blank prior to drilling. I suspect that slow speed rather than high speed may be the way to go too.
    2 points
  25. Have a look at this site run by Christian Dannemann "The Watch Guy". I believe that it is available for anyone to use.
    2 points
  26. My mentor taught me a trick which he learnt from his Swiss master. Wrap a tiny blob of Rodico on a pegwood, like a Q-tip. You'll save a whole lot more of the stuff. And change it more often. He also told me that the stuff from stationery stores, like Faber Castell's, work perfectly well, and at a fraction of the price of Rodico.
    2 points
  27. Probably not what you want to hear, but for the Rolex and Tudor cases I seem to gravitate to, I found the best method is to hold the case in my left hand, and the die with a handwheel in my right hand. Sometimes I may wear a thin leather glove, but often not. I like to be able to balance the downward pressure and rotational force, so it does not "chatter" out of the grooves and also that I am not applying undue pressure to the threads once it is spinning. I have an aluminum case holder with the four Delrin covered pins and either the case pops out of the pins, or the pins pop out of the b
    2 points
  28. Hi Markr will this do find attached cheers 3564_Citizen 0200, 0201, 0271, 0272.pdf
    2 points
  29. Just in case I am preaching to the converted, I appologise, There are several company catalogues available from material houses in the UK namley, Gleave and Co which contain a lot of useful data as well as the usual lists of parts, Free on application. Cousins uk also free and available for down load, Clocks there is Meadows and Passmore, on line or application, A.G.Thomas Bradford also on line. This information is probably aimed at New starters rather than the seasoned Hobbyist/repairer. The Gleave catalogue has quite a bit of technical data which is useful. Sorry if you alr
    2 points
  30. Here you go all the info you need about the Geneva Stopwork.
    2 points
  31. When you put it all back together, wind some power on the spring before putting the center stop piece in, then put it in the "stop" position (stop for unwinding). 1/2 turn is a general rule; what you really want to do is wind the spring fully without the stopworks to see how many turns of wind the spring develops. Typically this is about 6 or 7, but some clocks can be more or less. Very old clocks I see here often develop about 5 turns, and have stopworks that permit about 3-1/2, some modern ones from this area (Le Castel for example) do about 15 full turns of wind. You want to set up the stop
    2 points
  32. That’s cool but a blue seconds hand would be over the top on that one!
    2 points
  33. Quick shot of my 3rd finished fordite-dialed Seiko. I'm making a push to get my first production run of 10 out, and then I'll be focusing on adding the chapter rings and making some ETA 6498-compatible fordite dials.
    2 points
  34. @MechanicMike: Right now, I'm using a propane camp stove with a 6" x 6" x 1" block of aluminum to help with heat evenness. Another shot: I'm working on improving my watch photography too!
    2 points
  35. Can anyone help me with this one. Just bought it and it was pretty inexpensive. Swiss tradition automatic and looks to be a sw200 movement. I can't seem to find out a thing about the company or the watch.
    2 points
  36. I use stock hands or aftermarket hands, depending on what I think looks good. I tend to use stock hands (with their awesome lumibrite) more, but sometimes I switch it up. I'd like to say that this is always an intentional choice, but sometimes I fumble the hand installation and break a factory hand. I've gotten way better at installing watch hands, but I'm still not perfect. I am considering purchasing a Horotec Watch Tool Hand Press after a particularly painful and expensive loss of a handset from a watch I really liked. I'll be posting separately on this. No plans for indices, lumed or
    1 point
  37. If you haven't found one.. perhaps there is no need for one. A gentle push down - it's all you need to set a Central Seconds Hand on that watch. Just make sure your "pusher" is clean, flat, soft enough not to scratch the hand surface, etc. Do NOT try to push it 20 times "to make sure". One gentle push after it was centered and set correctly on the pivot. Then tilt the movement to see from the side if the seconds hand is sitting in parallel with the minute hand. There should be enough clearance between two. If it sits too low - it maybe that the minute hand was not pushed all the way down, or y
    1 point
  38. Well thats a bit unfortunate, from the enclosed blurb they are based on or exact copies of the bulova accutron made under licence, hope the attached will be of some use in determining the model you have and give you a lead as to the exchange unit if it can be found. One would suppose they are interchange able. I have also attached the sheet for the 214 which will be pretty close to the 218. Also have a look at Ranfft for the Bulova 218 for more tech details. Bulova Accutron 214.pdf Citizen - Electric Watches.html
    1 point
  39. @VWatchie Seems some videos produce more questions than answers - compared to reading books by proven expert authors (the old fashioned way, I know). To your initial question: Dynamic poising is to be handled with care. Conclusions are valid only, if the watch is in perfect technical condition! The mentioned watch differs by more than 50 degrees in those two vertical positions. Here the rate difference can come from isochrone effects (rate dependent on amplitude) - in that case, poise conclusions are not valid at all! Also a TM amplitude measurement can be unreliable, the real li
    1 point
  40. nope Bob at ofrei has got that job locked down. he's no idiot by any stretch of the imagination and is a good guy but he does the running all over the place looking for stuff for us customers. but yeah I absolutely get your point. well if you had the scratch and could afford a pro parts person, you'd still have to put in the time waiting for the actual part to get to your hands and into the watch. so ya might as well forgo the parts person and occupy your time looking for parts lol my worn circular path of travel is between Esslinger, Ofrei, Ebay, a few odd stops at Cousins and AE, then b
    1 point
  41. yes the magical amplitude as I call it should have zero positional errors showing up on the timing machine or the running of the watch. Of course the problem is keeping your watch running at 220°. Then running in all of the pendant/crown positions at exactly 220° is an issue. I'm guessing the problem when Mark does a video is time this means things have to be simplified. It's really hard to tell if you have a positional error if you only test in two positions that would show that. Ideally at least four pendant positions eight would be even better. then for the rest of your questio
    1 point
  42. Hi Neil and welcome to the forum I have attached two documents that you may find useful regarding watch repair, there is also another tool lost on the site, found through the search function on the home screen by DrG who is a member. Again its a comprehensive list. cheers 1612608791_ToolsfortheHobbyist (1).pdf TZIllustratedGlossary.pdf
    1 point
  43. Hello everyone, I keep finding this 70s ladies pocket watch in my junk heap so to stop it appearing everytime I have a dig I thought I would get it going. A new mainspring and balance staff and clean, and a lot of love and a little bit of oil, and bingo. I haven't timed it yet I just wanted to get it out of my junk heap. Now it's sitting in collection. What do you think? VID_20201118_162745.mp4
    1 point
  44. Welcome. It looks like the hour hand and the hour wheel are both missing. Complain to the seller.
    1 point
  45. had to look at this again-you're probably way ahead on this now but hey, I think this chap ring lo9oks cool as is!
    1 point
  46. Well technically I used a steel flange nut. After spending 2 hours cleaning jewels under my 1970's microscope and 10x loupe, I serviced it and reassembled it without the mainspring. It's coming in a couple of days. The last person to service this tightened down every screw overly tight. They lost one of the case mouning screws and the bridge over the minute wheel as seen in the thrid pic has two cross threaded screws that destroyed the treading. Right now they only have friction holding them in place. I have no way to re-thread them right now. Here are your pics
    1 point
  47. picked these up today
    1 point
  48. that is very true.... but I did finally get this one going again by swapping out the pallet fork.
    1 point
  49. Hi Guys. I have always used Bergeon drivers so cannot comment on the Horotec although they do look excellent! Having recently found the need for some larger sizes I looked on cousins site and ended up buying the Bergeon 9 set below. I have found these to be excellent in all respects and they do come with spare blades so for the price I think they are great value. As a hobbyist I try to balance the cost of tools with the quality I require so for me these were a no brainer as I can sell on my old sets and recover most of the costs, complimented with a new set of Dumont tweezers I am now s
    1 point
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