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  1. I don't get to post here very often. But I picked up an interesting specimen at a local flea market: a TruTime talking atomic watch - for a dollar. The vendor didn't know much about, except that he didn't know how to make it work. To be honest, neither did I at that moment, but I intended to give it a shot. I figured if I failed it would still be a cheap lesson. I happened to have a 2032 battery for it, still very fresh. As a precaution I cleaned the contacts and blew it out a bit. Put a touch of quartz oil at the very few pivots it had, and it just sat there at first. So I went online to search for the setup instructions. With their aid, I got it set and running. Now what? I don't need a talking watch. And I don't want to just sell it. My oldest daughter has a friend who is legally blind, and her sight is degenerating. So I'm giving it to her. Best use I could think of for it. I have to find the link to have a braille copy of the instructions sent out.
    7 points
  2. Without Youtube, or should I say the Internet, I would never have gotten into servicing/repairing. So I guess you're right about that. Nevertheless, it wasn't that I just happened to see one of those watch repair videos that got me started. It was a strong inner urge to be able to service a watch (long story) that drove me to actively research the Internet for information about it. Being well over 50 years old, having young kids, and doing fairly well in my profession, going to a watch school just wasn't an option (something I mourn quite a lot). I remember watching some of the videos on the Watch Repair Channel but having zero knowledge of watch repair, those videos basically just made me feel intimidated and confused. I should say that these days with all the knowledge I have obtained over the years I appreciate the Watch Repair Channel immensely and there's basically only one other repairer that I respect as much as Mark and perhaps even more. That repairer has a member name on this forum being a combination of one transition metal and one precious metal Eventually, I found a Youtube channel named "Ratfaced git". It was hosted by a retired car mechanic named Dan. Naturally, his approach was much that of a car mechanic, rather than that of a skilled and experienced watch repairer. Dan hardly knew the names of parts, didn’t care much and was proud of it. It inspired me endlessly and gave me - at that time a complete mechanical idiot - the courage to try it myself on one of those Vostok movements that could be had on eBay for a few dollars. Honestly, without those videos, I’m not sure my interest would have taken off and that I would be writing this post. I have now taken several online courses and I have some of the books by Fried and DeCarle, and I have learned tons on this forum, but without that retired car mechanic, I'm not sure that would have happened. Have I butchered any watches? Well, butchered is a strong word, but to be honest, some of the watches that I have been working on would likely have been better off in the hands of a pro. For that, I apologise to the watch gods and the pros. Yes, they all make it look so easy, don't they? Complete and perfect service and repair of a Rolex 3135 in under 40 minutes, and for that, "the pros have the audacity to charge $500 or more". Having some personal experience of what it takes to just service a watch without doing any repairs, I'm personally amazed that the pros can even survive at those rates, but I guess they're really good at what they're doing. Nevertheless, I think these Youtube videos are great for promoting watches in general and that means more people will want to have "a real watch" and that is a good thing for the trade on the whole. Sure, some of those affordable vintage watches will be butchered in the process, and however sad that is, there are millions and millions of them out there. And, although there's a lot of ooohing and ahhhing in the comment sections, I rarely see comments where people express that the video gave them the confidence to service/repair the family heirloom themselves.
    6 points
  3. How many years of experience someone has is irrelevant if they have been doing it wrong for all of those years.
    5 points
  4. Completely new to watch repair, shiny new tools in hand and impatiently waiting for a Unitas 6431/6445 to arrive in the post to begin to learn on, I decided to take a stab at disassembling and reassembling an old watch that was passed down to me, nothing sentimental, was just floating around with some unknown jewellery. With a bit of research I've found it's an Australian designed 9ct Hantily case with an AS 676 handwound movement. After researching Hantily, I've discovered that they were producing cases in a factory in Richmond barely a kilometer from where I live. The spelling of the logo (business changed several times) and the Ebauche SA TR shield stamp makes me believe it dates to between 1926–1934. I was too nervous to try and clean it properly, but I successfully managed to fully strip and reassemble the movement, set the time and recase it. The tiny movement size of 8.75''' blew my mind at how delicate things were. Several screws barely turned with my 0.80mm screwdriver, and I also had to drill a hole in my new loupe... While probably a stupid first undertaking at least now the pocket watch is going to seem huge in comparison!
    5 points
  5. So here it is. I couldnt wait to post this as I'm over the moon with it. I've wanted one since i started collecting. Would you believe i asked the universe for it ( the right way ) two weeks ago. So a couple of weeks ago i was at n.cave e.yorks carboot talking to a guy about watches . He had a couple of non descript clocks that i wasn't interested in but i asked if he had any watches. He said no not with him but at home he had a w.w.w. ( very large clue as to what is coming )wristwatch that he had had fixed but had broke again. I asked if he wanted to sell it and if so bring it in two weeks time when i come back up this way to see my sister. He said ok. He told me it had a blackface and he thought it was an Ingersoll. I wasn't aware Ingersoll made www watches and had never seen one so i thought maybe he's mistaken. So anyway keen to go back yesterday morning, i mooched around the carboot for an hour taming my anxiety and excitement ( i dont like to rush a universal gift, its not respectful and can get taken away as quickly as its given ). In doing that i also picked up a lovely 404ish clock. Eventually i made my way over to the guy's inside stall. Now then matey how's you i said , gud he replied, I've brought you something. He searched through a carrier and i was thinking it cant be much of a watch to chuck it in a carrier bag. A minute of searching and i thought hes forgot it never mind. Ahha he says pulls it out and hands it to me ( the watch ) . I look at it and look at him. Then I look at it, and I look at it , and then I look at it some more. Oh crap its a w10 military watch. He tells me the mainspring has gone, i said no it hasn't, its just fully wound. Have a look inside he said if you want. I had taken a screwback remover a loupe and a piece of rodico with me. I undid the back and peered inside. Its a Record i said, oh at least i know what it is now he said. I had a little prod with the rodico, unfortunately one of the staff pivots had broken, the top one. I said what do you want for it, he gave me his price I'm not saying how much but it was cheap. I said no i cant give you that, so he came down a tenner. I said no i cant give you that either. He said I'm not taking any less that that for it, i said i know your not, your going the wrong way. He looked at me confused, i said take your first price and double it. He looked at me even more confused. Mate its worth more than double what you want , I've got to fix it but I'm happy with that if you are. He wouldn’t take double and we settled in the middle. I gave him his money, we chatted for 15 mins and then shook hands, before i left he said i think i have a couple of pocket watches at home, ill bring them next week, if you come again you can have them. Wow Universe what have i done to deserve your praise. So here it is. As far as i can tell up to now. Its a redialled record dirty dozen (possibly). The movement is the same as the Record DD, the dial serial number relates to the Record. I have yet to date it yet but the movement 022K according to ranfft started being manufactured in the 1920s. Anyone that has some serious knowledge on military watches, i would be so grateful for any help working out what i have here. Here it is i absolutely love ❤ it .
    4 points
  6. Today I'm sporting a blue dialled four hander Accurist quartz alarm. The bezel is only for show and does not rotate, but over all its a very nice little watch. The picture doesn't do justice to the very eye catching deep blue sunburst dial. The alarm is set with the main crown. Turned anticlockwise it sets the alarm hand, and clockwise sets the date. The alarm is enabled and silenced with the button at the 2 O'Clock position.
    4 points
  7. For me, eBay is a great source of knowledge.
    3 points
  8. Today, a little bit of classic Seiko elegance in the form of a 1981 Seiko 5 Automatic. I'm assuming September 1981, based on a few hints from the internet (which is of course, *never* wrong).
    3 points
  9. The clock is running great now. The pendulum is adjusted just slightly off mid scale. Now I have moved it out of the LWS and to a place where it can be enjoyed.
    3 points
  10. I have had good success by unwinding from both directions, then twisting the wires together and then, using an iron with solder already melted on the tip, touch the twisted wires. The insulation melts and the solder flows to join the wires. Often, the tag end will melt and fall off. It is worth the effort regardless of the value because "practice makes perfect" and at some point you may run into an expensive watch that needs this service.
    3 points
  11. I would try conductive paint. This sort of stuff. https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/314056794488?hash=item491f3e6178:g:bz8AAOSwHrVivlzd
    3 points
  12. Update on hour wheel, I melted the solder and got the two parts parted. A quick measuring session and a wait for my lathe to be returned and a new one is turned. Just need to file the top and tap the hole for the hour hand screw. Customer is more than happy
    3 points
  13. I have refinished the top and made new rails. Obviously, I could not remove the stains that are deep into the wood, but I sanded it down, stained it, and put on a poly clear coat. It is not a perfect job but it is a major improvement. I am debating on whether or not to sand down the front. It is in the garage now and I do not have a place for it yet. My watch room (The Little Watch Shop) is full with five watch benches and one electronics bench. Not sure what to do...I will ask my therapist.
    3 points
  14. Yeah, pretty much. I'll grip the overcoil somewhere with one pair, then tweak with another where I want to modify the curve. This is with the spring off the balance. In the watch, if space permits, you can often do a lot with just one pair of tweezers- in fact one of my hairspring teachers pressed on us that it's always better to use one pair if at all possible; when you get two going you can mess things up very quickly. Out of the watch you need a second pair though.
    3 points
  15. Out of curiosity I have just tried a 2836 dial (same as 2824 but with day as well as date) on both 2772 and 2763 base plates (both same family as 2789 according to Ranfft). Interestingly the 28xx dial will mount onto the 27xx base plates with the dial feet locating properly into the relevant holes and the central hole lining up properly with the canon pinion and hour wheel so that the hands will go on. What doesn't work though is that the dial feet seem to have been displaced by about 2 or 3 degrees anticlockwise about the central dial hole, so the day/date window is correspondingly 2 to 3 degrees out clockwise. So yes it will physically fit, but no it won't work, unless you want a wonky date window
    3 points
  16. Hello and welcome to the forum, have a study at the attached, It will give you an idea of whats what TZIllustratedGlossary.pdf
    2 points
  17. In short, the natural rate of oscillation of a (flat spiral) spring is largely independent of the amount of motion (amplitude). Think also of a musical instrument string (even the name is different only by changin p to t), no matter how strong is hit, it plays the same note. You may find this interesting to read: https://www.forgottenbooks.com/en/download/IsochronismofBalanceSprings_10290824.pdf
    2 points
  18. Nice work! The general rule is for truing "in the round", correction is done at 90 degrees to the max error; truing "in the flat" correction is made at 180 degrees to max error. In your case there are bends next to bends, so keep those rules in mind but work as each case demands. Work from inside out. Pretty sure you'll save this spring!
    2 points
  19. Well I now appear to have a working display on my Hi Fi amp (aka my Yamaha DSP -A970 Digital Sound Field Processing Amplifier). My cheap from China display works. There are however, still a couple of issues I need to resolve. The original display has slightly different dimensions, so I am thinking of 3d printing an adaptor for it. It is currently fitted with one screw, some tape and a tie wrap. Its perfectly secure of course. Also the backlight supply needs wired to the original switched supply, as currently the backlight remains on, even when the amp goes in to standby. I may also check the old display as it may only be a failed tungsten filament backlight that is making that unusable, in which case an LED or two might fix that, and I can re-fit the original with no 3d printed adaptor required.
    2 points
  20. 2 points
  21. Whatever strange behavior happens in its present state means little or nothing. Only after it has been cleaned to perfection, all parts inspected and found to be good at least, then put back and lubricated correctly, you will be able to make meaningful observations about its performance. And It will be better that you use a timegrapher to make calls at that point. BTW if you really care about this watch it would bw better that you practice first on something else of no value whastoever, especially about hairspring and balance handling.
    2 points
  22. No worries man, I was just pointing out why your circuit was cooking resistors initially. I'm sure it works well after making the changes required based on the parts you had on hand. I think the real cheap ones don't even use basic rectification, they're just a simple inductor with one primary that's saturated as well. That's why they get warm and burn out after continuous use. It works for it's purpose but they're made as cheap and basic as possible.
    2 points
  23. @grsnovi is right! It’s an AS 340: http://www.ranfft.de/cgi-bin/bidfun-db.cgi?10&ranfft&&2uswk&AS_340&
    2 points
  24. I had acquired the book by going to a regional is also a companion one for jewels. Somebody finally made it into a PDF I've seen the staff one on eBay. Then yes the numbers correspond to the other numbers. There is no picture at the very top of each page they just list whatever the dimensions are usually works best when I'm stepping things out if I get the top of the page that your staff was at the bottom of the page. then I snipped out an image of the other books you can see what it is it's interesting because it went through and measured a huge assortment and that lets you look up staffs by size. With at the bonus at the end of the book they have all the various technical literature of various American watch companies. Plus if you're lucky a few of the staffs have all the dimensions more than you normally see in the list were somebody went to into the detail like you're going to make a balance staff but not all the staffs are listed in the back just some of them but typically the first book one I got your numbers from whenever I need a staff that's where I go unlock because then you can see all the verifications because most people don't realize that one number could refer while is one Elgin actually refers to 12 different staffs I think there's three or four groupings of differences for variations and all the rest the differences are the pivots size there's very few staffs that you only have one staff with no variation but they do exist there just in the minority then of course what makes this one interesting of the Swartchild's American Balance I think almost no one knows it hacks even exist it have to have literature from the material house and I was at a regional meeting just picked up some stuff is as always on the hunt for literature. I'm guessing somebody on eBay just scanned it and probably is not worrying about the fact that assesses copyrighted on the bottom of the page but it does become an interesting book to have
    2 points
  25. This is an absolute beauty from today's carboot from a posh old lass that was clearing her house to down size. Apparently passed down to her from her shorthand teacher 50 years ago .5 quid plus my fuel to get there 9 miles from home. I dont understand why some people part with these things . Its the loudest alarm clock tick I've ever heard, in mint condition. I did pick up an even better gem but thats for tomorrow unfortunately not a fiver but still a ridiculous price and something I've been after for a while.
    2 points
  26. Hi In my opinion Optical Microscopes are far superior to digital scopes for one main reason and that is depth perception offered by the use of a Stereo microscope, plus its easer to work looking down at the work area rather than looking up at a screen, it just feels wrong. This is the one I use, you will need to add a Barlow lens which is about £20 to give a greater working distance between work and lens so you can get your screwdrivers etc in under the lens but that's it, it will take a camera should you want to add one, I did and its a boon to be able to review video or pictures you took during the disassembly to help remember where all the bits go, it does not need to be super hi resolution so again not too expensive. https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/124373214244?hash=item1cf538a424:g:RBoAAOSwOQpfmcWS Its said that once you try a Microscope you will never go back to using a loupe and with that I can agree.
    2 points
  27. To the left, I've got this self build "Zap"-everything demagnetizer. One can get the the wheel-train and I tried to get the motion going. All seems to run free, including the rotor, but without the life support it doesn't show any sign of life ......
    2 points
  28. He's wearing gloves, obviously didn't want to get his hands dirty. Hehe.
    2 points
  29. Still, he tried to remove the centre wheel without having removed the cannon pinion. Maybe he thought he'd be lucky this time around, or maybe that was his way to assess whether the cannon pinion needed a bit of tightening or not (I'm sure he'd use his fingernails for that). A ticking watch. I remember years ago waiting in my seat to get off a plane in Asia while people were passing by in the aisle. Having nothing else to entertain myself with I noticed two things. Everyone was wearing and flaunting a wristwatch. None of them was on time (all were totally off without exception). Now I know which watchmaker they hired.
    2 points
  30. The reduction wheel moves slowly and it is not under much pressure, so whatever thick oil (graphite or not) will work fine. Some minor design details like this are not very important. You can find that the same manufacturer changes them in between versions or generations and even give different oiling instruction in their various service sheets.
    2 points
  31. the only minor problem with using the manual using the meter are you using a Mercury battery? If you have a Mercury battery than your fine but if you using a silver cell you have too much voltage. For phasing I use what they described here. http://members.iinet.net.au/~fotoplot/accphs.htm
    2 points
  32. I don't think so. Prior to the explosion of folks (of vastly differing ability, but often generally being perceived as competent to expert) posting videos of watch repair I don't think it occurred to very many people- i.e. next to none- to try repairing watches. When I see some of the videos, which are very popular, and the horrifying "technique" and the ooohing and ahhhing in the comment sections, I think the average affordable vintage watch is at much greater risk now. Just the comment section of the above video is primarily folks who are utterly impressed and making comments about the outlandish cost of professional repair. Then there's one YT channel, from pros who know what they're doing, that has half it's viewers believing that ultrasonics will hurt watch components. So... I've seen plenty of clock repair vids too, also from "professionals" (but far from expert), showing absolute rubbish technique. But if it's Joe from Joe's TicTocShop and he learned it from his father, and the viewer is a rank amateur, it probably looks like a great idea to punch around holes and fill things up with soft solder and use transmission fluid in the barrel etc. etc. etc. Probably going to sound like a grumpy old man here, but when I got into watchmaking I went to the library and read every book they had on it. Yes, DeCarle and Fried are a bit dated now (and were 25 years ago too), but when I finally made contact with some local watchmakers I could speak intelligently about different aspects and components, and I'm sure if I had been transported to 2022 to watch a bunch of the YT vids I would have a similar opinion as my future self. Also having read those books and yes, indeed, having worked on some flea market watches (with proper screwdrivers and tweezers, and they were also expensive then) I was way ahead in school when I made it there.
    2 points
  33. 2 points
  34. Both screws were reverse threaded and I now have it off! Thanks Mike
    2 points
  35. Get hold of Spencer Klein. He’s the 6309 king and will be able to get that puppy up and running back to its former glory. And he’s in the US as well. Not cheap, but it’ll be done right. He loves a watch with a story like yours. kleinvintagewatch.com - he has a YT channel where he rambles on about the interesting stuff he comes across. BTW: Your younger self had impressive taste!
    2 points
  36. It’s like driving past a car crash. You know you shouldn’t look but you just can’t help yourself
    2 points
  37. An update, should anybody need to know in the future. This calibre, the Lemania 1275 works with the 1-4 KIF Trior springs (top and bottom) – that's the 1.65mm version in the image in my opening post. I bought a micrometer in the end and managed to get a close enough measurement of the existing spring to take a punt on the right size. These KIF Triors are the fiddliest little rascals to install though, I can tell you. I missed Incabloc while installing the cap jewels, I must say.
    2 points
  38. personally I find when you're dealing with American pocket watches that of 100 years of interesting things have occurred to them. I find that static poising I can easily get a Delta within 15 seconds and that's good enough. I often find if I try a dynamic poise I end up chasing my tail and things don't usually get better. In other words when you're grossly out of poise static it to really close and then if you want to be a perfectionist you can dynamic poise.
    2 points
  39. I got round to boxing the homemade demanetizer up last night, i moved it from the biscuit box, so now looks a bit more sturdy, it's easy and cheap to build and perfoms as well as the branded demagnetizer costing hundreds of pounds. I printed a crosshairs onto a self adhesive postal label to stick on the box a the centre of demagnetization area. The only variation i made from the parts list was i used a 1N4007 diode instead of the 1N4004 listed as i have plenty of these, they are booth a 1 amp diode, i will change this diode to a 1N5408 diode as these are rated 3 amps. https://www.instructables.com/Demagnetizer-From-a-Microwave-Transformer/
    2 points
  40. Years ago I attended a party where a magician showed his tricks. He brought my quite valuable wrist watch to an immediate stop by just tipping with his index finger on the crystal. I was impressed! Months later I found out that this trick is done with the help of an artificial finger tip which has a little but strong magnet inside. The magnet pulls the seconds hand up to the crystal and stops the watch by friction
    2 points
  41. Come on Gaz, give us a tune. Ahhhh. Just had Bet Midler on the radio. A beaut that definitely has not lost her amazing voice. ❤
    2 points
  42. You are right about the right tool. Since my press is pretty much useless, I was finally able to snap it into place using 2 vice clamps. Time to upgrade tools again. Thanks for all the help. It is good to go now.
    2 points
  43. If anybody's interested I did a long speil on this forum about lubricants. Below is the link to the start of the topic. Follow the comments through as my inputs are in the comments. FYI I spent many years as lubrication applications engineer covering many industries. http://www.watchrepairtalk.com/topic/638-lubricants-basics/
    2 points
  44. It looks like snap-on. Look for a seam, maybe even a pronounced notch, around the outer diameter of the case.
    2 points
  45. Thirty days hath September, April, Tuesday, and November. Bidding on ebay ends soon, so if you want it you better be quick. If badly printed dials are not your thing, then perhaps this will float your horological boat. Have you just spent a fruitless few days fighting through the crowd of fanbois trying to get the latest and greatest Omega Moon Swatch, only to be beaten back by the zombie hordes. No matter, just trawl around on ebay and you can have the next best thing. A Swatch Irony in a bundle of tat equally desirable quartz watches for under a fiver for the lot. This is the latest potential entry to the 404 club. Before you ask, yes you probably can take this one apart, unlike the "Moonswatch" which I believe contains a completely un-servicable swatch chronograph movement, with a crystal laser welded to the (plastic, described as something space age) body and a debased Omega logo on the dial. Just my opinion however, the Moon Swatch may be the best watch ever invented, since I haven't actually seen one in the fanboi zombie dripping flesh. This particular Swatch was accompanied by an Accurist, a Ravel, and a "GMT London" (not actually as terrible looking as it sounds), one or more of which may or may not work. Time will tell. I will of course post pictures of any that I restore. NOTE: The author of this remark has a love hate relationship with Swatch, and may not be the best judge of all things Swatch related. So with that in mind, here is one I prepared restored earlier.
    2 points
  46. What amazes me is there was absolutely no attempt to "sanitize" or hide anything. The setup looks like it was from the '80s. Except for the part where they were using what looks like China made timegraphers. I can't wait to see the insides of a Chinese watch factory.
    1 point
  47. I remember reading on the machinist forum about a guy carrying out a punch and die set, setting it in someone's trunk, and the set slamming closed as he set it in. There was a mention of "popping grapes" which horrified me but apparently the bloke made a full recovery. I'm eternally terrified of punch sets.
    1 point
  48. Yes, on a machinist forum I frequent someone wanted to sell some small presses and there was a unanimous cry "if they were made after 19xx they're scrap". Presses scare the bejezus out of me.
    1 point
  49. I subbed and also have been watching the bearded one for some time also. hi guys!
    1 point
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