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Showing most liked content since 09/18/2017 in all areas

  1. 5 points
    TimFitz

    Lew & Me

    Here is my cat "Lew" helping me adjust a pocket watch and adding a hair to places one should never be.
  2. 3 points
    Chopin

    Starter tools?

    case back opening tools (for snap off and screw down case backs) case holders (not always needed but they come in handy; I have a plastic one to not scratch the case) movement holders (very important; usually come in pair of 2s, smaller and larger; mine are cheap and can be used on both sides so 4 sizes in total) a good set of screwdrivers (very important to get a stone or something to sharpen them or a screwdriver sharpener) hand removing tool (again I have a cheap one but it does the job just fine; there is also the 2 hand lever version but I prefer the special tool) good loupe or magnification (one of those digital microscopes might come in handy) a watchmaker's mat good light source hand fitting tool (you can use tweezers here I guess... as long as they are not sharp or pointy; I use the sides...) a good set of tweezers spring bar removing/installing tools (various types exist) a watch crystal press (if you want to replace crystals that is; there is also a claw tool that can be used but only in some cases) a digital double digit pair of good calipers (for measuring and stuff) an air blowing tool (not sure what it's called; use this to blow off debris from parts; human breath should NOT be used to do this) polywatch or various other acrylic crystal polishing substances (they say tooth paste works just as well) a cushion watch/case/movement holder (can come in handy sometimes) good oils and lubricants oiling tools (a couple of variants exist) watch part cleaning substances (in case they're dirty or rusty) This is all I can think of for now...
  3. 3 points
    wls1971

    Lathe Belts and Oiling

    You can get the belting off ebay you cut it to length and splice it together by heating the ends Mark has made a video on the subject : 3 in 1 oil is what I use for oiling the bearings on my lathe. The belt should have enough tension that it does not slip but not very tight as this will risk damaging the bearings
  4. 3 points
    Geo

    Canon Pinion Remover Tool?

    Also my preferred tool for tightening cannon pinions. I purchased a set of end cutters for about £5, drilled and tapped M5 and fitted a cap screw, job done!
  5. 3 points
    DJW

    First time lumed dial..

    I will try to put together a walk-through of the process of dial printing along with creating the plate itself. Honestly I spend more time on the computer designing the dial layout then it takes two create the actual plate or print the dial.
  6. 2 points
    measuretwice

    A handle for a Levin

    I have a Levin lathe that was missing a handle - that was today's little project and I thought I'd post some photos. The blank is small, .220" dia and less than an inch long. I turned the press fit section in big lathe then switch to a Pultra and did the balance by hand with a graver. Fun work, sort of like wood turning. The one I made is on the right, obviously not identical, but good enough for an eyeball job
  7. 2 points
    Josip

    Shelf life of oils VS time of use

    Many oils have suggested shelf life of 6 years when they are bought new. Then again it is suggested that watches should be serviced every 6 years so. My question is: If a watch is serviced with a brand new oils... OR ...With oils that are near their recommended shelf life Could one expect there to be a significant difference in the performance of the watch? I mean, in theory, the oils are either 6 or 12 years old at the time of the next service. Let’s assume that the oils have been properly stored
  8. 2 points
    Chopin

    Starter tools?

    To be honest I'm an amateur. Only serviced a few watches so far. Almost all of my tools are cheap (each costs a few $) but they do the job just fine especially if you are careful and patient. If you worry about the costs you can just start cheap like me and see if it satisfies your needs. It'll take some time to get all of the things that you need but you can get there in no time.
  9. 2 points
    clockboy

    Miyota 6P

    This should be helpful: http://miyotamovement.com/product/mfunction3.html
  10. 2 points
    digginstony

    Canon Pinion Remover Tool?

    While we're talking cannon pinions. This is a must for that gigantic tool box. It's basically a fancy pair of nail clippers with a micro adjuster. Made by Bergeon and comes with a fancy price. It's the best tool I've ever used for tightening cannon pinions and in my opinion, more accurate than using a staking set. Sent from my SM-G920F using Tapatalk
  11. 2 points
    praezis

    Shellite ok in the Elma Super elite?

    Do not use naphta at all, it may explode (if it is what we in Germany call 'Benzin')! I use Elma 9:1 myself and I am satisfied with the results. 2nd jar destillated water, 3rd jar Isopropanol. Frank
  12. 2 points
    szbalogh

    Canon Pinion Remover Tool?

    Pin vice is perfect to remove cannon pinions
  13. 2 points
    clockboy

    Canon Pinion Remover Tool?

    The top one is the best IF you can purchase a vintage version. The reason is for some reason Bergeon changed the design and as result the new one's do not work with the small cannon pinions.
  14. 1 point
    oldhippy

    A handle for a Levin

    What did you use? Was it mild steel. That looks very good and a good reason to put your lathes to use.
  15. 1 point
    PJA

    A handle for a Levin

    Good Job!
  16. 1 point
    Chopin

    Longines 291(?) help

    Thanks guys. I haven't decided if I'll "take a punt".... The price isn't as high as a functional one but not as low as 50$...
  17. 1 point
    wls1971

    Longines 291(?) help

    Yes calibre 290 no date calibre 291 addition of date at either 12 o'clock or at 3 o'clock
  18. 1 point
    rogart63

    Longines 291(?) help

    Is the 290 post the same as the 291. I now where you can find one. Send me a PM and i can give you the contact.
  19. 1 point
    oldhippy

    Longines 291(?) help

    You need to find out if the parts are Interchangeable.
  20. 1 point
    wls1971

    Longines 291(?) help

    no that part is a calibre 505, 1496 and will not fit you need the one specific to the calibre 291
  21. 1 point
    wls1971

    Longines 291(?) help

    The part it needs is a cal 291 1496 rotor post it is a separate part to the plate it is listed on the cousins web site as obsolete
  22. 1 point
    oldhippy

    Longines 291(?) help

    The axel has broken. The oscillating weight is held onto the axel by a clip, when pushed the weight is free to remove from the axel. The axel is fixed on a plate by two tiny screws underneath. You will need the whole plate.
  23. 1 point
    clockboy

    Longines 291(?) help

    It's a real pity because looking the movement it is in really good condition apart from the screw or post has been broken. The 291 is obsolete so its up for sale.
  24. 1 point
    clockboy

    repair a worn cap jewel

    The jewel should be changed. After grinding the pivot fitting will be incorrect. If you require diamond powder (mix with oil) I use Bergeon with 3 different grades & I purchased from Cousins.
  25. 1 point
    wls1971

    Longines 291(?) help

    Yes the post is a separate part that is secured with two screws from the under side of the bridge, why not ask for clarification from the seller as to what part is missing or broken if its just one of the screws that holds the rotor post in place it should be easy enough to find a suitable one to use but if it is the post that broken then you will have trouble finding one as you say the way to go would be a donor movement but that may start to make the good price look a little less appealing
  26. 1 point
    wls1971

    Longines 291(?) help

    It is a calibre 291 the rotor sits on a post at the centre of the movement and the screw on the rotor is used to secure it to the post. It is probably the rotor post that has broken, these are listed as obsolete on the cousins web site, it is a common problem with this movement I dont know if any other supplier would hold this particular part. The ring looks like a tension ring from a watch crystal and is not a part of the movement such as a movement spacer ring as this one is held in place with clamps
  27. 1 point
    PJA

    Starter tools?

    You are at the right place at the right time. This forum has a great group of people who love to help and teach people like us who are just starting in this exciting world of the watch repairing hobby.
  28. 1 point
    arkobugg

    Vintage glass metal ring

    Cheers everybody! In the lately I have done service on vintage Certina and Omega watches from the 50 and 60 s. And I see that many of this have an metal ring atteched to the glass or crystal. Can somebody tell me the purpose of this? What is it for? Thanks and best...
  29. 1 point
    Watchfixr

    Vintage glass metal ring

    A word of warning here. In many Omega crystals the ring was relieved to fit around and center the dial. The outer edge of the ring will be level with the edge of the crystal, but the dial is slightly smaller and fits into the inner relieved area that is recessed. If you press a new crystal with a solid ring all the way home, you will crush the edge of the dial with the tension ring.
  30. 1 point
    Oriawr1

    Starter tools?

    Thank you Chopin. O dear, what will I tell the wife. I never imagined this and doubt if I will be able to do it. I think most of you here have an aptitude for such things. I think I can only fantasise! Back to the watch maker but again, many thanks.
  31. 1 point
    ro63rto

    Invicta Signature II - 7281 Real or Fake?

    http://calibercorner.com/sii-caliber-vd53b/
  32. 1 point
    Steve21185

    baumgartner/brac

    Only insofar as they are both Roskopf-style pin lever movements... same basic layout but lots of detail differences. Have a look at them here: http://www.ranfft.de/cgi-bin/bidfun-db.cgi?13&ranfft&2&2uswk&Baumgartner_34 http://www.ranfft.de/cgi-bin/bidfun-db.cgi?13&ranfft&2&2uswk&Brac_37
  33. 1 point
    david

    Lathe Belts and Oiling

    For the lathe cone bearigs I prefer something a little thicker than 3 & 1 oil. I use hydraulic oil but a thin motor oil will also work. I purchase my hydraulic oil in a 5 gallon metal bucket from a hardware store. This is because I also use it as a solvent in a small solvent sink. For cone bearing applications a small should last several lifetimes. Small quantities can be purchased from an auto parts store. david
  34. 1 point
    david

    Lathe Belts and Oiling

    Years ago I switched from the "welded" belts to seemless O-Rings. They are stronger, grip better, last longer, are inexpensive, and most importantly for me, they don't make a clacking sound every time the seam in the belt hits a pulley. I purchased mine from MSC but any industrial supplier should be able to provide them. As luck would have it, the cheapest belt material worked out to be the best for the lathe application. david
  35. 1 point
    Endeavor

    Omega 861 Speedmaster Mark II

    Owner was very happy ........
  36. 1 point
    systeman

    Omega Info Required

    I just found out that Omega do a later version of Redima tick which id still current today.
  37. 1 point
    rogart63

    Omega Info Required

    Redima could mean girl. In Sanskrit Riddhima is girl. Take care if the watch is from India? Could be a fake?
  38. 1 point
    oldhippy

    Rhonda 1223

    I found these pictures from another watch forum. They might help you. There is nothing complicated with this movement its pin pallet and inexpensive. If you can take photos as you dismantle it. Here is a link about the movement. I'm sure we can help you if you get stuck. http://www.ranfft.de/cgi-bin/bidfun-db.cgi?10&ranfft&&2uswk&Ronda_1223&
  39. 1 point
    jdm

    foreign brietling navitmer movement

    And help was given. In the end, you're still quibbling about nothing, when the OP has already extended his thanks to everybody. Time to move on, right?
  40. 1 point
    Delgetti

    Help on an ETA 2391

    Ok, I reassembled the keyless works and the wheels for time setting yesterday evening and it works. Thanks to FlyingWatchmakers advice I knew where to look. Here is a pic of the downside of the minute wheel. Easy to spot the 3 mentioned areas which work as springs. I put a very little amount of 9501 in this area and blocked the minute wheel to test. Time setting works with a good feeling of some friction.
  41. 1 point
    Tmuir

    Shellite ok in the Elma Super elite?

    Shellite is good for the rinse, but you do really need proper cleaning solution for the initial wash. I use turps 70% to 80% shellite 20% for the first rinse and 100% shellite for final rinse. At my watch cleaning school we make our own watch cleaning fluid, but its not really practical to make your own for just yourself as some of the active ingredients and very expensive and unless you are making 20 litres or more it isn't worth doing. Unfortunately there really isn't an alternative to buying the real watch cleaning solution, but save yourself some money and skip buying their rinse. Where in Australia are you?
  42. 1 point
    clockboy

    Canon Pinion Remover Tool?

    Whatever method is used it is important to pull straight and even because it is so easy to break the pinion.
  43. 1 point
    jdrichard

    Watchmakers Lathe Or Mini Lathe

    I will look foe the video. The main reason i bought a boley lathe was to make balance staffs. I dont care how long it takes to learn, i will eventually master the art. of course i may ask you guys a question from time to time. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
  44. 1 point
    david

    Punches needed

    Cousins was a miserable company to deal with. Their only redeeming quality was their prices were a little better than other distributors but they jacked up them up and they now have no redeeming qualities. david
  45. 1 point
    digginstony

    Canon Pinion Remover Tool?

    It really depends on what you're getting into as time goes by. On larger movements you can even use hand levers but keep that lift vertical ! Nailclippers concern me as you may squeeze and pull at the same time which could severely damage the pinion. But they are a great "Lazy" way of tightening a pinion whilst still attached. I've come across several movements where accessing the pinion base has been difficult and the above pictured Bergeon tool has been the only effective way to remove it. As for the second photo. I just regard these as a waste of money if only even cheap but they do make good crown pullers, if you're dealing with a split stem. As for buying tools in case you may need them (Excellent Philosophy) definitely buy yourself a large tool box but don't let the Mrs know what you're up too [emoji16] Sent from my SM-T585 using Tapatalk
  46. 1 point
    oldhippy

    Watchmakers Lathe Or Mini Lathe

    Interesting reading about making balance staffs. It is one of the hardest things to master if you want to become a watchmaker. I learned on a Boley lathe with a foot control. You need to be very good with your grave and have complete control and bags of confidence. I had disasters lots at first, but my master would explain where I went wrong, many times, it was down to me making the wrong cut or not holding the graver at the correct angle and sometimes speed, you do not need high speed to make the final cut. . There are a few videos on YouTube showing how to make a balance staff.
  47. 1 point
    rodabod

    Longines

    Would be helpful to know which model of Longines watch.
  48. 1 point
    Hi all , and first of all thank you for all the pointers, it has given me the confidence to progress this. I applied the "24h rule" and came back to this today, and I am pleased to report I have successully disassembled the ratchet wheel. It turned out to be much easier than I expected. I started by lining up the square. As Stuart pointed out there are wear marks along the edge of the slot, which gave me the confidence to try a bit harder to slide the washer. I applied pressure at the end of the slot with a piece of pegwood to avoid any damage, and eventually the washer did move and its edge went over the recess. What became obvious only after disassembly is that the washer was actually dished, and therefore acting as a spring (hence the "no play" I had observed). So it had the ability to flex to go past the edge of the recess of the ratchet wheel. I was initially very reluctant to even try this as I expected a flat washer, which would have simply butted against the edge, no matter how much pressure was applied. Mystery solved, I have taken some detailed pictures given the interest this thread generated, so I will let them do the talking!
  49. 1 point
    oldhippy

    Punches needed

    You could try ebay. I have only just found out that Uncle Larry sells second hand watch/clock makers tools. Here is the link. www.execulink.com/~lfoord/tools.html
  50. 1 point
    Rob

    How Old?!? Not A Clock Mechanism As Such...

    The Clickspring YouTube channel recently started a series of videos about recreating the Antikythera mechanism. It should be good: