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Showing content with the highest reputation since 12/07/2018 in all areas

  1. 3 points
    Tmuir

    Longines 30LS

    All going to plan I will be picking up my Christmas present to myself tomorrow, a Longines 30LS in a 9K gold BAUME case. I'm getting it for a very reasonable price as I am buying it from a watchmaker I know and it is a watch he has had for a number of years. It will need a new band, but other than that is good and keeping time within a few seconds a day. I do love the gold chatons for the jewels in the movement too. I cant decide if the winding knob is original or not, as I have seen this model of watch with a slimmer winding knob and with ones like this, but it does look a bit chunky to me on the watch, so I may replace it if its not original.
  2. 3 points
    MattWatch

    Watch of Today

    This has been my watch of today pretty much every day since i bought it a couple months back! 70s Tissot Navigator Chronograph:
  3. 2 points
    rduckwor

    Watch of Today

    The "Turdor". An assembly of stuff used to build a watch. Had a spare 2824-2 sitting around and was bored. Why not? RMD
  4. 2 points
    Look closely through the hole while moving the stem in and out. At one point, either on the second or third position, a lever with a little hole or dimple will appear.push gently on it while pulling on the stem and make sure you do not pull the mechanism to the third position while doing it. The lever is seldom visible when the stem is pushed in all the way. Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk Pro
  5. 2 points
    yankeedog

    Help identify this watch

    What gets me is this....the case says movado but not the dial?this strikes me as odd.would a premium watch manufacturer put a no name dial on the watch? I think you have a mismatch here.it is entirely possible that dial was taken from a non movado movement..and just put in that case because it happens to fit. The movement maybe an AS an ETA or even a jeambrun. When I get a chance next week I will look a few of my subdial watches and see what possible movement could fit that dial
  6. 2 points
    MattWatch

    Watch of Today

    Thank you sir! Fell in love with it the moment i saw it, had to have it! The movement in this particular timepiece is the Lemania 872. Pretty well regarded i understand, i need to do a bit more research on the movement to be honest. Pic of movement and a better pic of the watch itself for your viewing pleasure The only thing missing from this watch - i WISH it had an exhibition case back! I am tempting to look at the logistic of having one made up.
  7. 2 points
    margolisd

    watch timing machine

    Hi Dan. I have a Weishi and it works great. You certainly don't need to be a rocket scientist to use it but there is quite a bit you should learn about. Beat errors, lift angles positional adjusting.There is a great video here on how to regulate watches. But if you really want to get into it, there is a great book called Practical Watch Adjusting by Donald De Carle. You can buy it on Amazon. Good luck.
  8. 2 points
    ricardopalamino

    Watch of Today

    Colorful , fun watch for a cloudy day....Seiko Bellmatic in great shape .........
  9. 2 points
    HSL

    Watch of Today

    What can go wrong when airing a Timex after a long time. Here we see a Timex 4047-3167 with the bells and everything, enjoy.
  10. 1 point
    MattWatch

    Some past projects and keepers!

    Hi All, Now, to start with I should say that my watch repaires are nowhere near the caliber (......see what i did there?) of some on this forum, but everyone started somehwhere right? Up until now I have been into costmetically restoring watches that run but have been somewhat unloved. Out of that I have started getting into the mechanical side too, I'm currently building up a FL Twin Power movement (one that I did not take apart) using the age old "yep, that seems to fit there" and "hmm that doesn't look quite right" methods! Some resources on this very forum have also been extremely useful. I can get the odd dead watch re-started, but a full strip down, service and rebuild is where i would like to get to. As i say mainly cosmetic work, the interest for me is taking something that looks completely unloved and turning into something that will be cherished. My watches have been bought for birthday presents, wedding presents, something that's being bought specifically to hold onto and pass down to the next generation, and that's what it's all about for me. Anyway, some examples for y'all Hamilton Self-Winding: Stunning Louis Erard Triple Date: Longines: Omega Geneve (never did try to sort that bottom lug out just in case): Oris 15 Jewel: Oris Super: Roamer Popular: Rotary 17 Jewel GP: 70s Seiko Auto: Seiko SeaHorse: Tissot Visodate Seastar Seven: Tudor: Old Timex: Thought I'd leave it there as you're probably getting a bit bored That's probably about 10% of the watches I've done over the past couple of years!! In terms of my own 'keepers', I don't actually have that many. A couple below: Tissot Seastar that I fell in love with the moment i put it on: Oversized Tissot Antimagnetique, which i sold and then pretty much begged the buyer to sell back to me. Which he did.....but failing to mention that hands were fused together. So i wound it not realising, and it's now broken and slightly in bits In the future I'd very much like to aquire a genuine military issued chronograph, that will be my significant investment watch i think. Hope you like! Matt
  11. 1 point
    aac58

    Watch of Today

    My watch collection isn't big, but here I go today with this Seiko 6119-8090 from 1969. (Photo from the fridge)
  12. 1 point
    I wonder if there is maybe a build up of oil oil or corrosion in there. You could try polishing it with an abrasive like autosol or brasso and then thoroughly cleaning before lubricating again. Or just buy a new part for £5.
  13. 1 point
    Number 1 is a case back opener I think the long metal rod fits through holes on the silver round slotted part the black parts are dies that fit into it also, these dies I think are for Rolex case backs are they very finely toothed along their edge ?
  14. 1 point
    I couldn't resist and added this diving-watch, anti-magnetic with the classic 420 model SS-case, 2409-movement to my collection ........ How much more Soviet does it get !?? I haven't received it jet. The bezel is new and perhaps I leave it like that, perhaps a SS-green numeric bezel and a fresh seconds-hand? ........ we'll see what suites best. I'm after the more rare dials out of the CCCP-period and after many years, this is the first time I've seen this dial. Has anybody any idea what the symbol in the dial may mean? A certain Sports event related? It has the original anti-magnetic cover under the back-lid;
  15. 1 point
    Those are the screws. they clamp down on the dial feet, which are actually tiny posts attached to the dial .This watch does not look rusty, so they ought to back out without any problem, just don't get mad at them .
  16. 1 point
    JohnR725

    Help identify this watch

    It would've been nice to have a little more to go by. So based on the previous reply my watchmaker 125 and 135 are probably too big although they claim to be 28 mm. I'm giving you the link so you can look I'm just going to Through Movado watches with Sub seconds. So some are bigger than 28 mm so I'm not putting them in the list that I course Some are smaller which brings up the problem of the second and won't be in the right place. Then I don't know if you can take the images on the website if you know the diameter figure out all the rest Of the dimensions from that as to how well that's going to work or not. So for the limited list I have it looks like watchmaker got it right because the 75 is about the right size and there is a image of the dial side. It's the last link I have. http://www.ranfft.de/cgi-bin/bidfun-db.cgi?10&ranfft&&2uswk&Movado_150MN http://www.ranfft.de/cgi-bin/bidfun-db.cgi?10&ranfft&&2uswk&Movado_135 http://www.ranfft.de/cgi-bin/bidfun-db.cgi?10&ranfft&&2uswk&Movado_125 http://www.ranfft.de/cgi-bin/bidfun-db.cgi?10&ranfft&&2uswk&Movado_473 http://www.ranfft.de/cgi-bin/bidfun-db.cgi?10&ranfft&&2uswk&Movado_75
  17. 1 point
    WatchMaker

    Help identify this watch

    The style of your dial, and with the sub seconds, probably makes it from around the 1940s / 1950s. First let's assume the ligne size. The often used Movado 125 movement from watches of this era can be excluded because, being a 12.5''' movement (at 28mm+), this would be too large for your case which has an ID of only 28mm. Similarly a 10.5''' ligne movement at 23.7mm (covering a movement such as the Movado 261, again, often used) can realistically be excluded as if your dial feet are 22.5mm apart this would put them perilously close to the edge of the dial to fit such a movement (which I'm assuming they're not)! So I think we're in circa 11.5''' territory for a Movado movement with 17 jewels and sub seconds ... also extremely likely to be manual wind (era of watch and the flat case back). In that case there are few (Movado) movements it could be and almost certainly we're therefore looking at the 75. If you locate an image of the dial side of this type of movement, e.g. from ranfft, it looks like the dial feet positioning holes are in the right place from the description of your dial too. Result?
  18. 1 point
    Wdc

    Watch of Today

    Here is my contribution to the “Watch of the Day”. My Citizen Quartz Calculator GN-4W-S 4-096673 TA (1978+-). I have seen it referred to as the Holy Grail of Citizens Calculator watches. I don’t know about that, but I do enjoy the watch. Something I stumbled onto while searching & purchasing Pulsar P2 watches. Sadly, the crystal was hit at the 4 o’clock position, but still fun to wear.
  19. 1 point
    oldhippy

    Red gasket - silicone?

    There should be no need in lubrcating casback gasket. If the gasket is in bad condition just replace it. Having the corect tools for fitting the back plays an important part.
  20. 1 point
    rodabod

    Red gasket - silicone?

    My understanding is that they can be left dry. I'm not sure if it would be all that bad if it was lubricated though.
  21. 1 point
    Today was NWD (New watch day). I received a Seiko Sumo from a friend to live with for a while. What an excellent friend he is too. It's going to be a while before I take this one off. ;-)
  22. 1 point
    TonyC9

    British School of Watchmaking Course

    There are several online courses you can join were the instructions is via video via YouTube the instruction I free in s kind of search for topic to learn from ie straighten a hair spring or the author instructor , Mark Lovik (I think that’s the name);runs his own sunscribed watch repair, cleaning and other horological knowledge. I think he’s s natural patient Teacher. Whatever it’s worth checking out and you seem enterprising maybe it’d be a good relaxed route back to the more formal learning once you’ve developed more skills and knowledge. Join forums read up online books make friend and continue to ask questions. It not that you failed to get in it’s just they only had enough room for people a bit more prepaired. Good luck eh!
  23. 1 point
    G’day all, Here’s my little collection of watches. Some are complete, some are not Some years ago, with saved up birthday and Christmas money, i bought an 1877, key wind, American Watch Co. Full Hunter; Stirling silver English case (that’s a few years older than the workings), engraved balance cock and 9ct gold balance wheel. This is my everyday watch, when it’s not too hot to wear a waistcoat A Swiss Acurex, 17 jewels, bought for a few dollars from an Op Shop (Ozzie version of a Thrift Store). This has seen service for when the above mentioned temperatures arrive. Unreliable now, so probably needs a service. Not worth paying for one, so will wait until my knowledge and skills are high enough. A Smiths pocket watch, pin lever, some of the wheels are just stamped out. Bought it a couple of years ago figuring that it might be a, non precious, watch to learn on. Plastic lens was all scuffed. 40mins of sanding and polishing cream fixed that. Balance wheel was sloppy as all else, and my dad said that one of the balance pivots was probably a screw. The one up under the dial was, so I fine tuned it. Within a week it had come loose again, so I put a dot of Lock Tight on the thread, re-fine tuned it, and left the dial off in case of recurrence (the dial’s only held on with bent tabs). Sits on my desk in a wire stand as my desk clock. Recently my Wife and I found a little shop in a nearby town that has the remains of retired watchmaker’s stock, both working watches and parts ones. I’ve been raiding his $5 tub. So far I have two fusee works, both missing the balance wheel and pallets, and a couple of other bits on each. One is by John Anderton of Huddersfield (found him on a list and he had his shop there in the 1820’s), and the other one is R. Cunningham of Liverpool, with an older style of regulator. No dials. Hope to tinker, and make parts and dials for them over time, but even if I can’t get them going, just having watch works that were made 200 years ago, and at $5 each I love hand work and engraving. The next 4 watches and works, also from the $5 tub, started ticking when given a gentle rock. In fact the first one, the workings of a Lombard Vernon & Co. pocket watch, that were sitting in a zip lock bag, started ticking away when I turned the bag over. I haven’t been able to find anything so far on the ‘net about them, and the main brass chassis, with the regular ‘works in it, has a white metal 1/2 plate on top with a collection of damaged springs and cams on it. Wondering whether it was a chimer or something. Missing winding stem (and anyway it’s grotty so running it is probably a bad idea in it’s present state). Quite a few jewels. The Odd Ball watch of the lot: A wind up ‘digital’ pocket watch! I had not seen this sort of thing before (though have now looked them up on the ‘net and seen some Very expensive versions, mostly wrist watches. ‘Liga’ brand, Swiss made. Pin lever. Ticked when rocked in the shop, but wouldn’t wind (no resistance or click). Thought it might be a broken mainspring, but $5 what’s to lose In the car I popped off the back with a screwdriver to find the clickspring rattling around loose. Found where it was supposed to be, fitted it, and, hey presto, winds and runs under certain circumstances. Have largely cleaned it, including the grotty celluloid window, and hope to get it going properly soon. A nice watch to learn on as it doesn’t have as many wheels as a conventional hands watch. Love watching the hour wheel flick over (a pip at the ’30’ position on the Minute dial engages a star wheel under the Hour disk). Have, since the photo, put the front watch case on my lathe and finished it with a fine grit, leaving a nice, subtle, radial polish. Heuer stop watch. Will run for a few seconds at a time. Very clean inside. No winder or crystal. Missing movement restraining screws (what’s the official name for those?) Generic Swiss made watch. The hour hand was bent around the minute hand, and once dis-entangled the watch spontaneously ran for a 1/4 Hour. Hour hand didn’t survive No winder, but apart from that, a new crystal and making an hour hand, it may be a goer without much work. Marathon over. Hope you enjoyed it. Cheers Duncan
  24. 1 point
    Put down your hammers and back away....Just kidding . Some members have stated thar's how they service Timex Watches . I picked up this Timex Electronic , back-set , front loader at the swap meet for $8 . It wasn't running and had an AG10 battery still installed , but with no visible damage to the movement . This one has the M87 movement with the date . This is a late 60's model called " The Blue Nebula " with a West German movement that was produced by the Laco watch company that Timex acquired when they bought Durowe-Laco at the end of 1958 to get into the electronic watch arena ..... http://electric-watches.co.uk/makers/laco/ I got home from the swap meet , opened the watch up and installed a new battery . The watch would only tun for a minute or less . I did some reading on this movement and started to disassemble it for a service . If you have ever tried to service a Timex you know why the hammers are used . I got as far as taking off the magnet and then the balance and then a voice from above said , " don't do it . Don't go any further "...so I didn't . What I did do was to clean and tighten any electrical contacts that I could reach , and put a light oil on any jewels and bushing in reach and assembled the watch again . At that point it would tun for an hour or two , and stop . I would shake it and get another couple of hour worth of run time . I left the watch under a light bulb for a while and it ran for approx. 24 hours . Back to the light bulb treatment that I may patent and the watch has been running for 5 days now and actually keeping very accurate time .....Honest . I had a watchband in my stash but have had to file some areas where the lug area of the watch was binding . I still have to smooth and buff those areas so it has a better finish .
  25. 1 point
    JerseyMo

    WARNING !! Timex Content Ahead !!

    yes, the Nebula dial is a cool one and have a very unique case as well. Just two of those in my collection.
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