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Showing content with the highest reputation since 04/11/2019 in all areas

  1. 6 points
    JBerry

    Watch of Today

    Picked up this Sandoz Alarm watch, a bit big for my wrist, but it has a certain retro charm
  2. 5 points
    Blue steel can't be cut with a jeweler's saw but can be filed. That used to be how they checked the repivoting exam for clocks back in the day- saw bites, fail, file doesn't bite, fail. The commercially available blue steel bars watch and clockmakers typically use is very hit or miss. The nomial size is often way off (not such a big problem), and the heat treatment can vary between too soft, uneven, or sometimes actually ok. I have some and use it for pins and such. For staffs, stems, pinions- anything from steel- I use oil hardening steel in its annealed state. The standard in Switzerland is Sandvik 20AP, probably not so easy to find in small quantities elsewhere. In the U.S. O1 would be the closest thing (and is a fine steel for watch parts). Parts get hardened and tempered after machining, with generally the last 0.01mm or removed in finishing for bearing surfaces. For a staff I cut everything right to size except the pivots which are a good 0.10mm oversized, and I leave the taper for the roller table straight and oversized. After heat treatment, holding on the now straight roller diameter the top pivot is brought to 0.01mm over final size, the surfaces polished, rivet formed. Flip around and do lower pivot, roller taper, polish. Finally finish pivots in jacot. Heat treatment is a little different than most books or schools teach. I use an iron tube welded to a long thin bar. These are actually CO2 or N2O cartridges from selzer or whipped cream bottles with the neck cut off (about the size of the first two digits of an index finger). This gets filled about 1/3 with fine wood charcoal powder, parts go in, filled the rest of the way. The whole thing is torch heated until glowing orange, then the contents dumped in oil. The parts fished out with a magnet, and they are a nice grey color and very clean. After cleaning off the oil they are blued in a pan of fine brass filings over an alcohol lamp. With the above method there is rarely any deformation of even long thin parts, and no pitting.
  3. 4 points
    AndyHull

    Watch of Today

    I think I spent rather too much time getting this to work again. I still haven't dug up a suitable crown, but it is running, all of the corrosion is gone, and the crystal is not too shabby. I popped it on a period correct band. So what was so interesting about this little Timex you may ask? Well it turns out it is just as ancient as I am, since it was produced in 1964. It had pretty much everything wrong with it. Covered in interesting (and no doubt mildly toxic) blue and green corrosion. It had no crown (but the remains of a stem), wouldn't wind, wouldn't run, couldn't move the hands You name it.. However in between a few household chores including having to nip out and purchase and replace a Venetian blind who's plastic supporting beam decided to shatter in to a million pieces bringing the whole mess crashing down on to the window ledge (and destroying a glass vase of flowers in the process), this afternoon, I tore it down, cleaned it, replaced a few bits and eventually got it running nicely. I've included a picture of the new blind, just so you can admire my handy work. It still needs a little bit of cosmetic work, (though that hair at 8 o'clock is now gone I assure you), but given that its age, I think we can forgive that, unlike the original window blind, which was only produced in 2015. Somehow I doubt if the new blind will last any where near as long as the watch.
  4. 3 points
    JerseyMo

    Watch of Today

    today's watch is a Timex Marlin from 1969 and the same year as the picture in the background. The picture is from a group of photos made available to the general public directly from NASA back in 69'. I was only eleven years old than. geez!
  5. 3 points
    Johnnie

    Best way of attack ?

    Done ! And running, it's 02.22 and my eyes are like organ stops. It turned out ok and I am pleased with it. Many thanks for all your help and advice. Ps, it's very good on petrol !
  6. 3 points
    PaulnKC, I went through the same thing a number of years ago. The device that worked the best for me was definitely a microscope. Low power loupes have a decent range of focus but as the magnification increases the range of focus decreases. At 20X any head movement will throw the watch movement out of focus. Since the microscope lenses are fixed in a frame, you can examine parts at 40X with no problems. Also, your eyes emit vapor which will fog up the loupe. I would vote for the microscope hands down. david
  7. 3 points
    AndyHull

    Watch of Today

    Its boring old quartz day today, as I'm going to be doing a bit of a general tidy up around the house, and need something that can take a few scratches without any worries. A Sekonda freebie from the junk pile on a random NOS leather strap.
  8. 3 points
    Nucejoe

    Watch of Today

    As5008 was/is the valjoux of AS in alarm movements class, in most brands.Here is a fortis brainmatic AS5008.
  9. 3 points
    Nucejoe

    Watch of Today

    West end watch co.
  10. 3 points
    wls1971

    More Mystery Tools...

    The bottom items look like cut floor brads a type of nail used for nailing floorboards down, flat to prevent splitting as they are hammered into the floor board.
  11. 3 points
    ro63rto

    Watch of Today

    Sector Depthmeter today
  12. 2 points
    rogart63

    Poljot 2415 cap jewel?

    Like to help . If i have the parts. But don't like the ones that always ask for parts. And not contributing to the forum. I ask for help sometimes and it's great to get some back. Scratch your back and you scratch mine
  13. 2 points
    AndyHull

    Pallet Stone Wear

    You could also use something like silicon carbide or boron nitride, if hardness was the only consideration, but there is a trade off between price, hardness and ease of manufacture. The steel should in theory wear out long before the sapphire does, but that does not take in to consideration the ingress of dirt, which may include tiny particulate matter from the environment, the watch manufacturing process, and any cleaning that has been done over the years. If a tiny piece of silicon carbide manufacturing dust, or an industrial diamond shard from a cleaning cloth was impregnated in one of the teeth of the escape wheel for example, or was introduced in contaminated oil, it could slowly, over many years eat away the surface of the palette stones. Dirt, as you are no doubt aware is one of the major killers of watches. You can find highly abrasive dirt pretty much anywhere in our modern industrialized world. You may find this interesting.
  14. 2 points
    oldhippy

    Pallet Stone Wear

    When it comes to the pallets, the only part that should be oiled are the pallet stone faces. Never oil the pivots of the pallets as it will cause drag and the movement will fail to keep time. You must use the correct oil for the escapement, if you are not sure which; look for one that specifically says for watch escapements. Some watchmakers prefer to oil the teeth of the escape wheel and let the combined action of pallets and escape wheel to distribute the oil. Pallet stones should be smooth on their face, any marks, chips and they should be re-placed. The stone is harder than the escape wheel so it is most likely it also is worn.
  15. 2 points
    Place an @ before his handle. E.g. "@nucejoe" without quotes. Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk
  16. 2 points
    Nucejoe

    Watch of Today

    Rado elegance, powered by eta movement.
  17. 2 points
    anilv

    Pallet Stone Wear

    If the pallet stones are worn then the escape wheel is probably worn as well, changing one without the other doesn't make much sense. Have you fitted a new mainspring? If not that is what I would replace first. Anilv
  18. 2 points
    anilv

    Best way of attack ?

    The triangle is to vote up an answer. In the topic index there is a 'pinned' post explaining the Vote Up function. Anilv
  19. 2 points
    JerseyMo

    Watch of Today

    My first watch was a Timex as well and recall getting it on Christmas, maybe 1965 or 1966. No idea whatever became of it. Maybe I actually restored it all these years latter without knowing. The sprite will always be smaller than a Mercury or any other of the made for men series. BTW: here is the 64 Marlin out for a ride on the wrist. Although not quite as interesting as a window blind, I added some "eye candy" to the photo for artistic impact!
  20. 2 points
    watchweasol

    Pallet Stone Wear

    Hi The enclosed PDF's are from Witschi training bulletins and explain the tic/toc issue with the escapement regarding the sounds picked up on their timing machines. They may be of some use to you in understanding the action of the fork and impulse jewel on the roller Witschi Training Course (2).pdf Test and measuring technology mechanical watches.pdf
  21. 2 points
    Nucejoe

    Watch of Today

    Zenith respirator. My father wore it thirty years then gave me the watch twenty years ago. Never needed a part, nothing ever malfunctioned.
  22. 2 points
    jdm

    Best way of attack ?

    I dislike to clean anything with diesel fuel. It's greasy and smells bad. And in the US isn't even cheaper than petrol.
  23. 2 points
    vinn3

    Best way of attack ?

    good show ! now sypon some petrol - add the two 50 / 50, try that. vin
  24. 2 points
    saswatch88

    Best way of attack ?

    acetone and alcohol should also be avoided when cleaning pallet and roller jewels. use naphtha (ronsonol lighter fluid) cheap and you dont have to syphon any out of your car lol
  25. 2 points
    Johnnie

    Best way of attack ?

    Hi Vin, yes it's very cheap, I syphoned it out of my wife's car !
  26. 2 points
    HSL

    ETA 251.262 Walkthrough

    Even though the garden is screaming for attention one has some spare time to continue my magical journey through the heap of quartz movements. This time it is the ETA 251.262 Chronograph which can be found in watches like Breitling Colt Steel, Certina DS FIRST, Longines Hydro Conquest and so on.. I'm quite surprised of the amount of quartz movements which are getting a new life after a good clean and service. As usual all the files are in a PDF format, and all pictures are original. ETA_251_262_Dissasemble.pdf ETA_251_262_Assemble.pdf
  27. 2 points
    vinn3

    Best way of attack ?

    diesel and kerosene are basically the same ! NOT the best solvent - for cleaning today. BUT, it is CHEAP. VIN
  28. 2 points
    HSL

    Watch of Today

    Sorry forgot about the movement porn bit... unforgivable I know. This one has an little bit odd one .. lets call it a Certina 28-10 humping around with the odd oscillation of 19800A/h ..
  29. 2 points
    jdm

    seiko question

    What I was saying above is that "staffs" are never referenced, only the balance complete is. And if you take apart one of these most likely it will not run properly if put back together.
  30. 2 points
    jdm

    seiko question

    I don't think the balance staff was changed, but that's not relevant to practical repair because only the balance complete is orderable, and it not meant to be taken apart. What was changed on the balance complete is just the hairspring end stud. One can fit A/B/C types across versions as long the arm (in practice, the entire balance cock) is matching the end stud. These also fit Seiko 4R, 6R series and their SII equivalents, although the latter have different P/Ns and materials and finishing.
  31. 2 points
    jdm

    seiko question

    As noted, the 7009 has the same balance as the 7S26A. For 7S26 parts change across versions one can check my table: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/e/2PACX-1vRN2UULQKTfKmhRStZhDdIOIQrqd6sPB-g6x2SKyQQjOvTBjG_7TQXQhAT4f1WqAX5QAPkIimi-3jqd/pubhtml
  32. 2 points
    AndyHull

    Watch of Today

    Time to lower the tone again I'm afraid. Just before Christmas, I decided to see what was the cheapest new analog watch on ebay. I wanted a baseline to compare everything else to. Here it is. It cost a whopping 76 pence, new, shipped from China, and included a battery. It is of course truly dreadful. The case is plastic, the strap is.. something unidentifiable. It was covered in dust when it arrived, and I suspect wearing it may give me a rash, but its a risk I'm willing to take for science. It has run, (ticking rather loudly, amplified by the chap plastic case and thin metal dial) since it arrived in late January, and only gained about a minute over that period, so not exactly accurate, but not dreadful either. I have no idea how long the battery will last, probably about the same length of time as the "leather" plasticized cardboard strap, but for 76p you get two spring bars, a set of "fake lumed" hands, and matching fake pushers and fake chrono dial, a no-name Chinesium movement, a battery and a high potential for contact dermatitis. You will of course observe that what I received bears no relation to the picture on the original advert, so even the advert is fake. What more could you want for your money. Oh.. and it has a blue dial, so I'm slightly warming to it.. or is maybe that is the skin reaction kicking in. The depressing thing is, the Daniel Wellington I picked up used, for 99p is actually not that much better. It does have a metal case, and the dial and hands are slightly higher quality, and the original strap may actually have been leather (it arrived on a cheap nato replacement) but bear in mind that when new it would have cost between 100 and 200 times as much.
  33. 2 points
    ro63rto

    Watch of Today

    Seiko Asymmetric today Paid more for an extra link as I did the watch IIRC [emoji35] Got a black dial one waiting for me to transplant a new movement too but that one came from Japan so needs two extra links [emoji37]
  34. 2 points
    aac58

    seiko question

    Part # of Balance complete with stud for 7S26C is 0310197 and for 7009 is 310 020, so I'm afraid they are not compatible. However the balance in 7S26A is 310 020, so it is the same than in 7009.
  35. 2 points
    Nucejoe

    Watch of Today

    Chrono quartz. I especially like the finish on the case, if satin finish or hard chrome, I don,t know. The picture dose injustice, bezel is actually spotless.
  36. 2 points
    AndyHull

    Watch of Today

    More blue strap fun. I'm not sure that blue is the perfect colour for the "Mardon", but since it was the only 17mm strap I had that wasn't attached to anything else, and since I can't think what else I would put it on, blue it is. De-gunked, dial cleaned, case polished, movement serviced, new crown and stem fitted and ticking away nicely. It is looking a whole lot better than this..
  37. 2 points
    milosbn

    Aerowatch Neuchatel conversion...

    Still i didnt place movement holders into case. Waiting them to arrive from Malasiya. But so far this is how it look like. I have trim the winding steam..hand made leather strap 28 mm on watch and 26 mm on buckle. Overall looknice Послато са SM-J600FN уз помоћ Тапатока
  38. 2 points
    oldhippy

    HAC Ballerinca clock

    That hat is too small for my big head.
  39. 2 points
    Tmuir

    New Horology Books for me

    I'm a self confessed bookaholic, not just Horology books, but books on model engineering, jewellery making,woodworking, restoring classic cameras, gardening, cooking, brewing etc. Basically if its a book on how to make or fix something I probably have atleast 1 book on it. I've even got books on how to make books. (book binding that is not writing a book)
  40. 2 points
    AndyHull

    Watch of Today

    Nice, lots of character, and one of those rare watches that actually suits a blue strap.
  41. 2 points
    AndyHull

    HAC Ballerinca clock

    I'm sure I saw some similar plastic domes on either ebay or ali express, being sold as display cases or some such. In fact... try this ebay search... https://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/i.html?_sacat=0&_nkw=plastic+display+dome+large&_frs=1
  42. 2 points
    AndyHull

    Best watch brand for beginners

    I agree. Pocket watches, mechanical alarm clocks and desk clocks are good, as they have nice big components and are less likely to be damaged. You might also like to look on ebay for the really cheap basket case hand wind watches, or perhaps some second hand Chinese mechanicals. The big skeleton movement Chinese manuals and automatics come up regularly, and I've picked up a couple of the last few months for less than £4.00 each. Citizen and Seiko manual winds and automatics are another option, but they tend to be slightly more pricey. Also worth considering are Indian HMTs which are a bit of a favorite of mine can be had for a few quid. The ones with the most hideous repainted dials from India, often go for rock bottom prices. The HMT manual and HMT automatic watches are clones of some of the good quality Citizen movements, and they are pretty robust mechanisms to play about with. Quite forgiving, and not much money if you come a cropper while learning on them.
  43. 1 point
    oldhippy

    Greetings from NYC

    Thank you for your introduction and welcome to this friendly forum.
  44. 1 point
    N0bby

    Hello from the Isle of Wight, UK

    Hi and thanks for the welcome. tritto, it's always nice to hear from people living in far-flung parts of the world who know the Island. I'm thoroughly enjoying myself so far, and hopefully my knowledge and ability will build little by little as I aim to reach the "not totally incompetent" level of tinkering.
  45. 1 point
    I did not join Marks course but the feedback I have received is very positive. A price tag of $1245.00 US is way to high IMO.
  46. 1 point
    harlantk

    Hello from Eastern Iowa

    My name is Tim, although officially Harlan Timothy, so please feel free to call me Tim. When I searched for a watch repair/making forum, I found this to be a really nice community, a place where I can search and learn what I would need to know on various watch repair issues. I am an old retired fella and redefining my interests to keep my mind under control :). I have had a varied background professionally and I wish to continue to use and hone my skills or even take them to a new level. Watch repair is definitely a whole new level. My interest here comes from the little boy in me, loving shiny tiny moving bits and pieces and the engineering marvels we can do! As we are cleaning up the family estate, I was given my fathers watches and jewelry, compelling me to try and restore his watches. When I started my career in electronics, one of my first fields was meter movement repair and calibration. I worked for G.E. and had many movements on my bench for jewel replacement or hairspring repair. My hands were much more steady then, and I will learn if I can still hold a steady hand. It comes from the meter movement repair job, that lit the fire of watch repair in me, some 40 years ago. After the work at G.E., I moved on to medical equipment design and engineering, then semi retired to my passion of violin making and restorations. So to sum things up, over the years I acquired many tools, some which can be helpful in this, but knowing the right tool is always necessary to do something right, I am now adding new tools to my stash. I of course will need all the suggestions and advice to properly set up a new bench. Timing is always nipping at my heels, and as I am beginning this, I am plopped into a move, so my time to practice and attempt to hone my skills will rather limited. But makes for a good time frame for putting things together for this hobby. So that is the brief (extremely so) bit about me and what I wish to try. I am looking forward to getting to know everyone here and hope all shall forgive me as I forget names and places a lot. Memory is going here for sure. I wish all a good day and well being. Tim
  47. 1 point
    Marc

    Sekonda 19 Jewel (Raketa 2609.ha)

    Just before Christmas I sold (through the good offices of eBay) an absolutely immaculate example of a 19 jewel Sekonda hand winder. I was a little sad to see it go as I don't think I am likely to see another in as good order for some time, and having just serviced it it was running like a champ but I couldn't justify holding on to it. Well, shortly after it had arrived with its new owner I received a message through eBay from the buyer. Huw had contacted me to say how pleased he was with his new acquisition, and did I service watches? as he had another example of one of these that was a little stiff in the winder and gained about a minute per day, and he felt that it maybe could benefit from a bit of a spruce up. I have done quite a few of these so am reasonably comfortable with them so I quoted a price and accepted the commission. A couple of weeks ago Huw's watch arrived so I thought I'd do this as a walk through. Looking well used but not abused, Huw had explained that he bought this not too long ago as a stop gap whilst his other watch (a Sekonda quartz chrono) was out of action with battery issues. First impressions are of a watch that has seen a lot of wrist time in its (probably) 40 years. The Timegrapher trace confirms the rate at roughly +60s/day, and confirms that a service is long over due. With the crystal out of the way the condition of the dial is actually rather good. The shadow to the right of the 7 is a lens fault on my camera, not the dial. With the back removed there is plenty of dirt speckled around the whole movement and everything is bone dry. The good news though is that it doesn't look like anyone has messed anything up inside. You can see the spring clip retainer on the escape wheel end stone (a bit like Seiko Diafix but not quite as clever). You can also see corrosion to the back of the bezel, this watch spent a lot of time on some ones wrist. With the movement out of the case the reason for the stiff winder and all of the dusty crud in the movement is brutally apparent. The outer end of the stem has started to rust causing it to bind in the case, and the resulting rust powder is thick on the inside of the case. These cases are a bit prone to this kind of problem as there is absolutely no attempt to seal them even against dust, let alone water, so even sweat on a hot day can seed the beginnings of a corrosion problem. With the dial off the press fit retaining plate for the motion works is exposed along with the keyless works. There's that little end stone retaining clip again, and the Raketa version of Incabloc on the balance. The rust doesn't seem to have got this far. With the set bridge out of the way though there is a hint of rust in the keyless works. Ouch!!! Just in time me thinks!! Balance and cock removed and the hairspring looks to be in good shape apart from the terminal curve which is off concentric. That will need to be sorted or the regulator will distort the hair spring as it is moved. Here also is the shim that Raketa are fond of using under the balance cock to adjust the balance end shake. A bit further in and plenty of gunge under the ratchet and crown wheels. Train bridge removed to reveal the train layout and a sub-bridge for the 2nd wheel. The main plate stripped with the screws put back in their respective holes. I do this so that screws don't go missing in the cleaning machine and I always know which screw goes where. The stripped main plate dial side. And then with the balance reinstalled (minus jewels) ready for the Elma. After a thorough clean everything is ready for inspection and reassembly..... ....starting with the balance jewels. This is when I check and adjust the hair spring for flatness and concentricity, eyeball the beat, check the end and side shake on the balance, and that everything swings freely. If you leave it until later there is too much other stuff in the way. Once I'm happy with it the balance/cock assembly comes back off until later. There is still a little work to do in this pic as the coils are still not quite concentric. The main spring re-lubricated and back in the barrel. This maybe could have been replaced but it wasn't too bad so went back in to help keep the cost down. Barrel, barrel bridge, 2nd wheel sub-bridge, and train back in place. Pallet fork and bridge installed. You can see the exit pallet poised ready to receive a drop of 941 on its impulse face. Walking the pallet too and fro then distributes the oil to the escape wheel teeth. Drop in the balance and away she goes. The cleaned up and de-rusted keyless works go back in.... ...and then the motion works and cover plate. Dial and hands back on, and ready to re-case. Again, to help keep the cost down I didn't replace the crystal with a new one, however, the original was just a little too deeply scored to easily polish out and there was what looked like a very small fracture. So a quick scout through my spares box and I found a second hand replacement which has cleaned up nicely. And the proof of the pudding ... as they say!! At 230 degrees the amplitude isn't anything to write home about but it is a significant improvement on the starting point. A new mainspring would almost certainly help this up into the high 200's (on the watch Huw bought from me I seem to remember it was 300+), but 230 is certainly usable. It is otherwise a nice clean trace with minimal beat error. It has been running for a week now in which it has gained just under a minute, so after a final tweak to the regulator it will be ready to return to Huw. I like these movements a lot. They are well designed and well executed, and capable of excellent results if looked after. They also seem to turn up quite frequently at the boot fairs. Unfortunately though, the lack of any attempt to keep moisture out of the case does mean that they quite often suffer from corrosion issues, and the relatively low cost (both when they were new, and when they turn up second hand) means that they are often used as a beginner watch smiths practice or learning watch, with the resultant butchery that many of us have dealt out as part of our learning curve. It's a shame in many respects, but then we all have to learn somehow. When you do find one that has survived unmolested though they are very well worth looking after. My thanks to Huw firstly for buying my watch, secondly for asking me to help this one to keep going for a few more years, and finally for allowing me to post his watch on here.
  48. 1 point
    jdm

    P6040482.JPG

    From the album: Staking Set

  49. 1 point
    stoli67

    Micrometer & Pin vices

    From the album: Andrew (stoli67)

  50. 1 point
    First, have it come in, check if pads clean, coil continuity, etc. Then, rhere are 5H23 and 5H23 going cheap on the bay, I guess the difference are not too many to take the needed parts or the entire movement. Technical guide: http://thewatchsite.com/files/Seiko Technical Manuals/5H22A_5H23A.pdf
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