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  1. 3 points
    Others I've seen have a screw in the centre of the rotor....this one, I'm sure how to remove the rotor. It looks like this. Thanks! EDIT.....ok figured it out, 2 screws and the whole automatic winder comes out, rotor is screwed on from the bottom.....should have scratch head before asking
  2. 2 points
    fireftr45

    Mainspring winder for Seiko 7S26

    Thank you all!!! I am finding out that Seiko has discontinued making a lot of these mainsprings for 7S, 4R, 6R. I guess they just want you to buy a new movement. So a generic spring will most likely have to be sourced. They don't even sell the barrel complete anymore. (or I just haven't found a viable source yet) I have gotten a little frustrated lately, as I started purchasing spring winders from ebay. The first turned out to be a pocket watch spring winder that is too deep and the spring winds up in a ball. The second set I bought was an adjustable K&D 123, A & B, that fits the barrel but the right winding knob has the nib that grabs the spring hole worn off, so it won't wind. I am still very new to this. This is the first spring I am trying to wind up and it has been a source of stress so far. The spring has gotten kinked several times so I just decided to keep practicing on it till the tail broke off last night. I will say I almost had it once, but when trying to get the spring to let go of the knob, as I removed the winder knob the spring popped out. I suppose I could just keep trying to find a newer knob for the 123A, but I am gravitating towards spending more for the Bergeon and be done with it. My thinking is I could always add new drums one at a time as needed over time (as I don't have $1K+ to drop on a whole set). Well again Thank You all for your help. I will keep trying.
  3. 2 points
    Ishima

    Mainspring winder for Seiko 7S26

    I had to service my Seiko, same callibre, worked the mainspring by hand. If you haven't seen this, keep in mind the barrel lid comes off a little differently to normal barrels, as shown.
  4. 2 points
    chadders1966

    Silicone Grease (For Gaskets)

    Back to your original question I don't really see you can do anything about it anyway if Cousins are insisting it is silicone. Interesting point you raise though about KT-22. Bergeon don't say their version is silicone, I have some from an American company that doesn't mention silicone and it certainly doesn't look like silicone. Yet both Cousins and Walshs call it silicone (well, Walshs call it silicon for some reason). Makes me wonder if the word is being used incorrectly to mean gasket grease or something like that? Stephen
  5. 2 points
    Marc

    how to remover the rotor on an ETA 2452

    Pics 1 & 2 - canon pinion. This can be dismantled if needs be but there is a risk altering the tension at the friction coupling or distorting the sprung arms so I don't bother. Just run it through the cleaner as is and lubricate the friction coupling on reinstallation. Pics 3 & 4 - The date driving wheel doesn't come apart. Just through the cleaner as it is. Pic 5 - Auto winding reverser wheels. These don't come apart either. The official ETA guidance is that they shouldn't even be cleaned, just replaced. However that's is rarely required. Run them through the cleaner as they are. Lubricating these is a contentious subject. I have a 1 part 9010 to 30 parts naphtha solution that I dunk them in and then leave them to allow the naphtha to evaporate. This leaves them coated with the thinnest film of 9010, and I have never had any issues with them sticking. There is also a product called Lubeta which is specifically for lubricating reversers which is used in a similar way. Do a forum search or Google "lubricating reverser wheels" and you will find various solutions and much disagreement as to what should and shouldn't be considered. Find what works for you and ignore the critics Pic 6 - The main spring barrel. The damage doesn't look too bad but if it were mine I would use it as it is and see how the watch performed, but I would also look out for a replacement. You could try polishing out the damage but it's fiddly unless you have a lathe, in which case mount it up in a step collet and see if you can clean it up without either weakening the parts or making too much room inside the barrel. Easiest though is to replace. When you have the problem sorted check the main spring for flatness and if it is out replace it. The problem is most likely caused by a distorted M/S and highlights what can happen when a spring is inexpertly hand wound into the barrel. You should always use a M/S winder where possible, and perfect the art of hand winding for when a winder isn't an option.
  6. 2 points
    familyguy

    Refurbished watch from India

    Some pics - I know forum members like pics. Still have not managed to get the bridge on, main concern is breaking the pivots. I put the bridge back without any of the gears just to gauge the amount of pressure needed to seat it - not much, I did notice though it needs to be put on squarely, then assembled with only the two larger gears, took about 20 seconds, I noticed that the jewels are opaque and I can see the pivots moving around through the jewels. It is the circled gear that is causing me headaches. Not about to give up though. A pic also of the stem with the remains of the tube next to it.
  7. 2 points
    JohnR725

    How do I start on this

    Personally I think I'd rather have this than having a hairspring all tangled up. So an interesting book is "Bench practices for watch and clockmakers" by Henry B Fried Has a nice section on what to do with hair Springs that don't quite look right. I would suggest though practicing on a practice hairspring first. But if you lack of practice spring you could try just be careful not to pull too much. So a couple images out of the book.
  8. 1 point
    familyguy

    Refurbished watch from India

    Received my practise watch the other day, a Mumbai special from Ebay, the watch looks pretty decent clean shiny and at first glance could well be described as new. The dial is an obvious repaint but does look quite decent, a working mechanical watch, swiss movement with a new band for around $16 delivered - I have no complaints. A quick wind and away it went, I don't have a dedicated timing machine but I do have TG and Watchoscope on my laptop, a quick test showed a rate of about +75 seconds/day, a beat error of approx 2.5ms the amplitude varied from 140 to 190 deg (not sure why). This is about what I expected so no surprises here. Came back to it after diner and found it had stopped, checking the winder it felt as it was still fairly well wound, I gave it a few more turns and away it went, after taking off the back I let down the main spring and found it had been just about fully wound. I gave it few turns and it came to life only to stop after a few minutes, I found it needed to be almost fully wound to keep going, no matter, it is a practise watch and will be a challenge for me to see if I can (a) strip clean and reassemble without screwing it up and (b) find the cause of it needing to be fully wound to continue running. Had some trouble getting the movement out of the case, the plastic spacer holding the movement central came out with no problems but releasing the winding stem I found it could not be removed as the tube it passed through was too small to allow it through, as I never intend to wear this and my primary concern is working on the movement I decided to pull the tube from the case so I could free the stem, a few moments with long nosed pliers had the stem and tube out - it was tight though and reasonably thick, I had a good hold on it and did not crush it. Although it is possible to strip a movement without the stem in place every thing I have seen/read says put the stem back once the movement is out of the case. With the movement out I gave the case a bit of a look and the plastic crystal just fell out in my hands when I tried to wipe a finger print from the inside. I had hoped the band would be real leather - maybe it is I can't tell, it does have FRACOMINA embossed on it - this is the name of an online fashion store. If I decide to reassemble it to a fully working watch I'll have to either source a new tube or make one - looks pretty small but do-able.The movement is now sitting on my home brew holder and hopefully I'll have time later today to do my first strip and reassemble.
  9. 1 point
    chadders1966

    Silicone Grease (For Gaskets)

    As I mentioned Bergeon don't say KT-22 is silicone. I don't know who makes theirs, but the American made KT-22 I have has an msds sheet that specifies it is made from mineral oil, so I think that is pretty clear.
  10. 1 point
    vinn3

    Hello from Alabama

    Thanks for serving - UNDER WATER ! I was just a "dry dock nuckel buster". your gona like it here. vin
  11. 1 point
    Marc

    Mainspring winder for Seiko 7S26

    I haven't measured one but it seems widely reported that the ID of the 7S26 barrel is either 10mm or 10.5mm. If you check Cousins web site it lists the bergeon winders by size. https://www.cousinsuk.com/product/watch-bergeon-winders-by-size No.6 has a diameter of 9.8mm so woud be the right size.
  12. 1 point
    astralmind

    Hello from Quebec, Canada

    Hi everyone, I’m glad to have found this forum through the youtube channel, it seems like a very active and friendly community. I’ve always been fascinated by early technology, automatons, watches and antiques in general. My previous hobby (short lived but intense) was collecting/restoring trunks which wasn’t exactly practical living in a small apartment! I stumbled on my great grandfather’s pocket watch last month in parents basement while helping them clean things up and it has revived my passion for these. I was able (to my surprise) to find all about it within a couple of minutes thanks to google and pocketwatchdatabase and from there on well.. I’ve spent way too many hours reading, watching videos and now, bidding on auctions and checking the classifieds J At the moment my collection is limited to 3 watches but I intended to add to it and Iearn as I go. Above and beyond the collecting aspect, I want to understand and, if possible, maintain/fix them..down the road. I ordered a few books already, horribly cheap Chinese tool (knowing it is not a great idea but at 20$ it shall satisfy my curiosity for now) and if all goes well, I should inherit a few damaged movements that need to be looked into. Verge Fusées caught my attention (of course.. expensive stuff) and I’m hoping to find some experts on here from whom I could learn. If by coincidence there are some members willing to share their knowledge in the Quebec (Montreal) area, give me a shout! Looking forward to interesting discussions,
  13. 1 point
    astralmind

    Hello from Quebec, Canada

    Thanks for the warm welcome! Just to be clear, I certainly don't expect to own (much less take apart !) a Verge Fusee anytime soon hehe. I'm actually on the hunt for lots of broken movements to play with. The watch I posted isn't the one I found from my great grandfather but my actual first purchase off the classifieds. T
  14. 1 point
    clockboy

    Mainspring winder for Seiko 7S26

    There is no barrel supplied by Bergeon that fits the Seiko 7s26. If I remember correctly with the Bergeon set they are either too small or to large. I used a K&D winder that I usually use for the larger pocket watch barrels. Oldhippy is correct Seiko recommend a new barrel & mainspring. I have noticed Cousins have the mainspring as obsolete. However I have done a little research & the consensus is the mainspring size required is: 0.95 x 0.12 x 400 x 10.5. Which is ref: GR2378X Cousins have this in stock.
  15. 1 point
    tholt

    Hello from Tim

    I'm Tim from Saint Paul, Minnesota in the USA. I'm a systems support engineer for Windows and Unix applications. I'm a tinkerer and shade-tree mechanic for hobbies. I was bitten by the watch bug two plus years ago when I was awarded a modest watch at work. Just like with motorcycles and firearms, the more I researched my watch and other watch things, the deeper I got in. I changed all the batteries in my quartz watches for a start. Then I started buying interesting junk off of eBay. Now I'm up to a motley collection of 10 or so watches that I wear fairly regularly. I'm looking forward to getting further into the hobby and frequenting this site. Tim
  16. 1 point
    oldhippy

    Mainspring winder for Seiko 7S26

    I know Seiko parts are not so easy to buy these days. Seiko back in the 70’s and 80’s advised, you should replace the barrel complete after (I think 5 or 7 years) you’re not supposed to take them apart. Its possible you will not find a winder that will fit.
  17. 1 point
    jguitron

    Mainspring winder for Seiko 7S26

    I’ve found that for some Seiko mainspring it’s best to use a combination of one handle and another drum. The appropriate size drum has too wide of a post. Anyway, my 2 cents. May just have to do it by hand... Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  18. 1 point
    anilv

    Watch of Today

    Wearing a Mido 'chronometer' with a 'tv' case. Its pretty chunky, But at least the caseback is reasonably flat! It still has its original band but its missing some links. It fits me but is at its maximum at the clasp. Bracelet is a Stellux. Inside is a Cal 1157 which is what Mido calls the AS1920! Sorry no movement pics. Pretty weird design typical of the late 70s, early 80s. Anilv
  19. 1 point
    Hello Alvis, I recently did exactly the same as you and I finished up with a great machine fully refurbished. Sadly I didn't take any photos but did follow SSTEEL's posts for guidance. I did find the manual for the cleaner. I think it is the same one but there may be some differences. If you would like a copy I can send it in pdf. format to you. Also if you need any help then just contact me and I will try to do so. Best wishes, Mike
  20. 1 point
    MikeR

    Hi from MikeR

    HI, I'm Mike and live in the south of England, an electrical engineer, semi-retired, worked on antique clock repair for a number of years and now into watches. The only concession I make for electronic watches is Citizen. Excellent engineering. Other than that they must me mechanical.
  21. 1 point
    familyguy

    Refurbished watch from India

    Finally had success ! With no gears in place I noticed that the bridge does not just drop on but needs a slight push - it is ever so slightly tight on one of the locating posts and tends to stay in a partially located position. When trying to locate the gear pivots in the jewel hole if I release pressure on the bridge to allow the gear to be nudged into position, the bridge stays put and jambs the gear so it can't be moved I then have to lever the bridge up just a fraction to allow the gear to be nudged. It is now ticking away amplitude looks to be on the low side - I don't have any lubricants at present and did not oil any thing during re-assembly, thanks to all those that replied.
  22. 1 point
    Hi, My usual method is pressing on the rotor on the edge away from the weight. If the rotor weight has noticeable movement I would consider tightening up the bearings. Problem with any bearings which are not fully to spec is that the more freeplay the faster it degrades. On my own watches I may not do so if I know that the watch will see limited use. A NOS rotor does turn up from time to time but this is only half the solution as it does not address wear on the other components. Previously you could 'harvest' the parts from other watches obtained cheaply but even these are thin on the ground. On these watches if you are using them regularly I would suggest an annual clean and oil of the automatic reversers and rotor bearings at least. When these are neglected, debris will be the result and this affects the running of the watch. Anil
  23. 1 point
    I'm working on mine at the moment. Man, it was dirty. Here is the progress on the baseplate. A big thanks to SSTEEL for the tip on removing the jar holding springs before cleaning.
  24. 1 point
    Ishima

    ISO Swiss VS Cousins Watch gaskets

    That's a tough one, I have every confidence with my battery replacement reseals in cousins gaskets, and the servicing i do on mechanical watches at this stage of my career tends to be on old watches that are splash proof at best anyway, so I don't think about that much. If you're working on modern expensive modern autos that are 50m and up, and you're promising them resealed then it might just be worth the extra expense, (If its quartz it will need to be resealed with the next battery change in a couple of years anyway, so dont worry) I dont think anything would come back to you in any time frame that you could take responsibility for, but given that some of these watches go a decade without anyone looking at them, the customer might find 8 years after the service they jump into a pool and it floods, now obviously thats not really your fault or responsibility, even if it could have been theoretically prevented with an expensive gasket that would degrade more slowly, you cant promise people that their watch will be waterproof for a decade without maintenance. so it shouldn't cause you any problems, but perhaps more of an ethical consideration for the owners of the watches and what they might face way off down the line and whether that hypothetical situation would cause you to lose any sleep. To answer more directly, as chopin says they're a bit better, but not 8 times better.
  25. 1 point
    rodabod

    Silicone Grease (For Gaskets)

    Is Bergeon KT22 definitely silicone? I've seen it advertised as silicone, but their website does not mention the word "silicone", whereas their other gasket grease does mention that it is silicone.
  26. 1 point
    rogart63

    Silicone Grease (For Gaskets)

    It's like Bergeon KT-22? It says silicon grease but it doesn't smell like silicon? And it's not working very good either? Have used it on gaskets and it makes the gasket stick to the crowntube in no time. Use Seiko silicon grease . That's the best?
  27. 1 point
    trident

    Hi from Singapore!

    Hi, I am from Sinagpore. Was into watch collecting but took up a watch repair course a few months ago. Have been practicing with some old watches. And I hope to learn from all the experts here.
  28. 1 point
    ricardopalamino

    Panda Time…..Finally...

    Well I finally was able to scratch an itch for a watch I have tried numerous times to get and had come up short on those occasions . That watch is a Seiko 6138 - 8020 "Panda " Chronograph . The more I saw this watch and kept missing my chances at acquiring one , the more I wanted one. The pics are the sellers and he apologized that some of the pics had a yellow hue . He said he had it serviced a few years ago , wore it for 12 month , and it has been in a drawer for the last 2 years . The Watch : I think the day usually comes in 2 languages and I can see Sun in red letters . I'm curious if there is another language and what it is . I made an offer and didn't hear back from the seller for a few days so I figured the offer was too low for them compared to what they were asking . I feel it doesn't hurt to make an offer and see what happens , and sometimes you get a surprise . I can add this to my collection of other Seiko automatic chronographs . So far I have 2 Pogues and 2 Helmet/Vaders ……Maybe another Panda is in the future ….
  29. 1 point
    familyguy

    Refurbished watch from India

    After nearly 2 hrs straight I finally managed to get the bridge on with all of gears correctly in place, a slight push on the mainspring barrel has the gears spinning. Just to prove it was not a fluke (I wish) I removed the bridge and had another go - back to square one and having the same problems. I'll give it a rest come back to it tomorrow. On the positive side I didn't break or bend any of the gear spindles, they are small I measured one 0.2mm or 8 thou in the old system.
  30. 1 point
    Ishima

    Removing barrel lid

    Hand fitting mainsprings is really tricky. Unless you have experience removing and refitting mainsprings on scrappers or know what mainspring would replace it when you damage it, I suggest you open the barrel and attempt to clean and lubricate the spring without removing it, of course, thats not ideal, but much better than mangling the spring or being unable to refit it at all. Especially the case for smaller calibers/barrels. I think i must have practiced for many hours in total, repeatedly removing and refitting the mainspring, with about 10 different mainspring barrels on scrappers before I felt confident to do it for real, and I was long into the habit of wearing safety glasses due to unexpectedly losing grip at the wrong moment and it exploding out of my hand. ...maybe I was just a slow learner.
  31. 1 point
    measuretwice

    taking apart a Seiko 5Y23

    progress report...... You know what the difference is between a watchmaker who knows what he's doing and me? sore knees searching the tiled floor for parts. An that's with a bench with glass sides back and top and the pull out catch tray. Good news is I'm getting lots of practice and manual dexterity is improving. I usually find the part, but this time I managed to lose the rotor when it flew off . Being magnetic exacerbates the challenge, it could have stuck to so many things. This movement is out of production. I suppose these electronic watches are sort of a disposable consumer thing given the electronics will eventually fail, and with all the plastic they're not exactly inspiring....but hey, that one lonely jewel needed to be serviced and I'm a dog with a bone. As it turns out the yoke is just about rusted through. While Seiko forsakes you on the movement, the good news is both parts are still used in other watches (yoke and lost rotor) so they're available and on order. Hopefully I can make it work. The symptom of the watch was a jumpy second hand and not really keeping time. Turns out there were bits of metal stuck to the rotor, no doubt the missing chunks of the yoke. Interesting how the metal corroded in just that one spot which is an obvious stress riser. Stress does increase corrosion in steel so it seems a bit of a design flaw....the thin spring arm could have been wider through this section. Other than some crud from the battery, there was no other corrosion in the watch
  32. 1 point
    Tmuir

    Removing barrel lid

    If you can post a photo it would help, but usually you just push the bottom of the barrel arbor down onto something hard, or gently tap the arbor bottom down and it should pop the top off
  33. 1 point
    chadders1966

    Auto Oiler

    Hi Those oilers are not meant for working on watches - I tried them myself because of the price but they are not right for the job, lacking precision and leaking a lot. They may be alright for working on larger machinery. Automatic oilers are one of those things that some use, some don't. They are certainly not essential, but some people find them useful for specific jobs. Stephen
  34. 1 point
    rogart63

    Scrapper movement

    Maybe i could have that? Shall take a look during the day.
  35. 1 point
    vinn3

    Crown Wheel Interchangability

    if it fits and works use it. vin
  36. 1 point
    Hi szbalogh, Thanks, but it actually isn't... (I wish it was, would have made my life easier [emoji3]) Citizen must have picked up on the idea as their design resembles this much older Shock Resist design. If you scroll up in the post you will find more info on the device. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  37. 1 point
    szbalogh

    Refurbished watch from India

    Serviced similar movement recently (ST 96N), also from India My procedure is like this. Put the gears in their hole jewels in the mainplate. Place the bridge over them and add the screws and turn them half way in. Just to hold the bridge so that it wont fall off but it is moving freely up and down. Then hold the movement by hand (finger coats) and look at it from the edge from the balance direction with the loupe. Hold it to a good light. Now You can see what arbor is not upright. Usually i am using brass tweezers, thin toothpick (sometimes to thick) or thin brass wire in a pin vice to align the gears. The bridge usually will simply fall in his place if everything is aligned .... in case of some good movements. If it is not falling in place then i am just keeping my finger over it (dont push, just hold there), then align the gears, check them that both pivots are in their holes (push on the center wheel to check if they are spinning properly), now You can push on the bridge until it is in place. Have not broken one pivot yet.
  38. 1 point
    clockboy

    Hi from Singapore!

    Welcome to this friendly forum plenty of guys here to advise and also share their experiences. Enjoy
  39. 1 point
    oldhippy

    Hi from Singapore!

    Welcome to this friendly forum. Lots of good info here for you to get stuck into.
  40. 1 point
    Watchtime

    Hi from Singapore!

    welcome to this great forum....if you don't ask, you will not learn...Enjoy
  41. 1 point
    nickpeh

    Hi from Singapore!

    Welcome onboard! The more u practices the better u will be.
  42. 1 point
    Glad you found it out! On these watches, the rotor runs bare between the bearing surfaces formed by the rotor and the slotted retaining screw. If you have one which has too much end shake you can remove a bit of the raised portion on the inner side of the rotor, this effectively closes the bearing up. Do it a bit at a time so you don't remove too much metal. You should not have problem with the rotor hitting the mainplates as the amount removed is very little but check it anyway. In the event it does hit the movement plates then you need to grind off a bit from the edges as well. Anilv
  43. 1 point
    StuartBaker104

    Cleaning Lathe using Lighter Fluid

    Here you go. Start by removing the bearing dust caps - should twist and slide off. Then remove the split nut and loosen the pulley set screw. Then you can loosely fit the drawbar (no collet) and tap the end of it to loosen the bearing shaft. You could hit the shaft directly, but this will help protect it. Once removed, you will see the outer bearing cone has a pip which located in the slot in the shaft - important point for reassembly. Here are all the parts when disassembled. I remember reading that some lathes have a plain ring nut and a split nut. Mine doesn’t and I don’t think it should, but of course the shaft will only come out if there’s no threaded retainers in the way. Let me know if you have any other questions... oh, and don’t forget to refit your drive belt when you put it all back together like I just did.
  44. 1 point
    Geo

    How to open an old Elgin pocket watch?

    It sounds like a cannon pinion issue. Has it been snapped back in place properly? If it has, it could be needing tightened.
  45. 1 point
    vinn3

    Hello from Alabama

    welcome Erik. ever worked on the "Hawkbill". cheers. vin
  46. 1 point
    One of the great things about collecting and repairing is that feeling of taking a bunch of parts and making a working watch again. This restore begins with a scrap pile of cases from a former Timex repair center. I chose a late 1960's Marlin case that is missing the stem tube. So to the parts stash and one issue resolved. Off it than goes to get a bath in cleaning solution , polished, new crystal added along with correct case back. Next I service a used #24 movement also from the same lot the cases came with and the assembly begins. Since the hands are chromed, I just use an old eraser pencil to bring back their shine. The sweep comes from NOS stock. Grease the stem tube, set lever, insert a NOS stem\crown, snap on the case back and there ya go. Will give this one a wear to test its time keeping.
  47. 1 point
    I would absolutely recommend Bergeon which is what I use. But I have a set of six Anchor drivers I bought some years ago which I can't fault in anyway Sent from my SM-T585 using Tapatalk
  48. 1 point
    Federico

    Screwdriver set recommendations

    I use the ergonomic Bergeon set. Absolutely love it. To dress them I use the horotec sharpener. It's suppose to give you a T shape but I manage to get a normal V shape from it just fine. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  49. 1 point
    Tmuir

    Screwdriver set recommendations

    I purchased myself the Horotec set from Eternal tools this year and I'm very happy with it. https://www.eternaltools.com/watchmakers-screwdrivers/horotec-6-watchmakers-screwdrivers-set
  50. 1 point
    This week I took delivery of a www.brunelmicroscopes.co.uk BM1 long arm microscope. Several of you where interested in this & how I got on so I thought I'd do a review. bear in mind its written after only a couple of uses, by someone who has a few years experience on quartz but only 6 months experience on mechanical watches. Image from brunelmicroscopes Cost (including post & vat at time of writing) £219.60 First impressions where pretty good, for a couple of hundred pounds you get a well made, heavy & positive feeling microscope. you get a nice cover & some additional madnifications You can adjust the eye lenses to suit your eyes & adjust the long arm in various directions. I found three faults with the microscope, the first is if you swing the arm by 90 degrees the base is not weighty enough to support it & the unit tips over this means you have to pretty much use it directly inline with the base which gives a more limited space under which to work, especially if you adjust the eyes to suit a seated position, although once I got going I didn't notice it, it was enough. The second issues was the light got pretty hot & it didn't half make me jump when I touched the back of my hand on it, which being made to jump when your talking watches isn't the greatest of news is it! but I think this is only a matter of getting used to it as a set up The third issue was the quality of the lenses as you can see they look quite cheap & Chinese nasty & I'd like to have perhaps had something to put them in to keep the dust out of them. To work with the microscope is a joy! I mean a serious joy! my hand was a lot steadier, things where more precise. changing lense is a simple case of sliding one out & sliding the next in I found with the angle i'd set the eye lenses to gave me about 10cm of work space, which was more than enough, I didn't foul with the microscope at all. the first job I did with the microscope was to change a date when on a 255.411 from the white it was supplied with to a gold one from the watch I was repairing & I have to say I have never found doing a piece of work on a watch so pleasing. the preciseness So all in all, as a user you can see & feel this is an entry level stereo longarm microscope, but its still a long, long was out in front of an eyeglass/loupe and is a sound investment for an intermediate user & I would throughly recommend one at this price I'd give it about 7.5 out of 10. Lee