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  1. 7 points
    1940 14K rose gold Elgin driver. Polished up well. I upgraded the movement to a 675 from the 559 that came in it. The stretchy bracelet is a very early Speidel that was in amazing condition and polished well also. Her response: "that's pretty." Ho-Hum. RMD
  2. 4 points
    A little of this and a little of that and you can convert a common electric into one that is more desirable. Of course it helps I have a large stash of NOS parts.
  3. 4 points
    Nucejoe

    Safe separation of wheels

    With all due respect to both gentleman above.I just clean in place, these independently driven minute wheels and save yourself a headache. Regards
  4. 4 points
    I bought a Seiko LordMatic cal 5606A and noticed the quick change day-date wasn't working. A bit of Googling found out that they rarely do on these movements, due to the plastic wheel on the day-date corrector wheel rocker breaking (see pic). As it's such a common problem, I thought I was lucky to find a NOS one on ebay. Unfortunately the plastic wheel on that was already broken - I've since read that this is common on NOS items, the plastic ages and breaks. The one I have at the moment is spare time, so I found a bit of brass from an old pocket watch, got my finest file (#6), drilled a 1 mm hole, and started filing ... It took a while .... But got something close : I think it's OK as a first effort at making a part. It's not perfect, far from it, but doesn't need to be as it only needs to push the day-date wheels over. What I found was : I couldn't have done it without my stereo microscope Although a #6 file seems very fine, it's way too course to finish the part. I believe you can get #8 and #10 cuts. I sharpened the end of an old screwdriver to use like a chisel. I finished with some 3000 grit paper, but it's not easy to fix a small enough piece to use. I haven't stripped the movement yet, so don't know if the part works - can't see why it shouldn't Mike
  5. 4 points
    Tore

    Look at this beauty!

    I must show you this. Im so happy. Won at an local estate auction last summer. It is from the fiftys or the sixtys i believe, but hardly used. The cabinet i made myself, but i need a decent motor. The chinese sewing motor dont deserve this.
  6. 3 points
    AndyHull

    Timex Forum?

    This image from the Dundee based Evening Telegraph, of an assembly worker at the Timex plant suggests that it is probably a bit of both. Skill and custom tooling I suspect there was a knack to the various tasks, and specialists in each task. Furthermore there were probably teams performing each task, to keep things flowing along, rather than one individual performing multiple assembly tasks. So you would have a bunch of machinists on multiple similar machines producing batches of parts, another team producing the plates, another team of assemblers, another team doing the casing, a team lathe turning screws, others still machining the cases, fitting crystals, pins, straps and so forth. The trick with this kind of work, is to keep things flowing as smoothly and as quickly as possible. Any major bottle necks and potentially the whole plant grinds to a halt, and that costs money. I once got called out to the Schweppes plant (now called Coca-Cola European Partners or some such) in East Kilbride, to a failed custom branded industrial PC computer. Their maintenance team couldn't fix it so they called round all of the local computer companies until they found someone that said "aye, nae bother, we can fix anything", so I was duly dispatched to fix the thing with a bunch of random spares and a completely different PC. An entire bottling plant line was controlled by one PC (this was a long time back when computers were expensive), and therefore the whole place had ground to a halt. No pressure. I replaced the motherboard with my random spare, and off it went. As soon as it started back up the first task was to dump all of the contents of the various huge vats of ingredients into a skip as they had been sitting longer than their food hygiene policy permitted. Several thousand pounds worth of sugar syrup, tomato paste, vinegar, flavourings, spices and other consumable went straight into the waste bins, and the whole thing got scrubbed down and off it went, back to bottling thousands of bottles per hour. I can't remember the exact figure they quoted for the cost of the place sitting idle per hour, but it was of the order of tens of thousands of pounds. A few thousands worth of ingredients was small beer compared with the down time cost. The "Aye we can fix anything" attitude has stuck. You can fix anything, well almost anything if you are prepared to throw enough skilled people and enough money at the problem. Sadly the demise of Timex Dundee was not down to the failings of the skilled workforce, but rather the short sited attitudes of managers and politicians. Ever was it thus.
  7. 3 points
    markr

    One more day and my holidays start

    I got a Rolex for my wife last week. Best trade I ever made.
  8. 3 points
    HardTop

    Watch of Today

    Here's today's watch. I just reassembled it after checking the movement and cleaning some parts. I have a corrosion issue on the dial I will probably create a post in the relevant section to get advice about. (Omega Seamaster, 1960's, calibre 562)
  9. 3 points
    JerseyMo

    Watch of Today

    some others I've worked on this week
  10. 3 points
    HSL

    Where is my pallet fork?

    I think that is an cylinder escapement, it doesn't have any fork....
  11. 3 points
    JohnD

    Watch of Today

    Early 1970's Talis electronic (ESA9158 cal.) for me today........
  12. 3 points
    Marc

    Safe separation of wheels

    When I read your subject title I thought this was going to be something to do with social distancing!!! The wheel on the top of the plate (which drives the center seconds pinion) is a friction fit onto an extended pinion that comes through the plate, a bit like a sub second pinion goes through the main plate. There is a specific Presto style remover (mine is Bergeon 30638/3) for removing this wheel but it can be done with levers or even razor blades. The key thing is to ensure that the wheel is lifted vertically so that there is absolutely no bending force on the pinion as it is very brittle and easy to break, otherwise it should be relatively easy to remove. Reassembly is also easy, especially if you have a staking set.
  13. 3 points
    AndyHull

    Show us your blue dial watches.

    A few more recent blue dialled members of the 404 club.
  14. 3 points
    AndyHull

    Work during the virus

    No sense in taking any risks, I've gone for the full protective gear and some serious social distancing. It not easy servicing a Timex wearing this little lot, but better safe than sorry.
  15. 3 points
    One more part to come... http:// ETA 7750: Part 3 - Reassembly: Escapement Lubrication, Chrono Bridge, Automatic Bridge, Motion Work Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  16. 3 points
    jdrichard

    Work during the virus

    The Spanish flu killed 50 Million People in 1918. That fact just floored me. I have been lucky to be able to continue to work as our company, aerospace defense, is considered to be an essential business. That said, we have deployed everyone to their homes to work; except manufacturing. Working from home with FaceTime, Google Duo and RDP or VPN is not really an issue. It’s the idea generation that is caused by random interaction with people. Also, I am a social animal, so not seeing people is hard for me; but I do have a very understanding wife. I have an HDML splitter for my iPhone and can push my FaceTime video to a 72” screen and have virtual coffee with my best friend and family members...kind of cool. I also purchased a desk tripod and a iPhone holder, knowing that we will be at this for months. Cleaned the crap out of my office and now can do work and watch repair in the same space. I also put a non-watch repair video of me playing Europa by Santana on YouTube. So everything is relative. working from home and self-isolating is not as bad as: 1) 55 days in a submarine without surfacing (a friend) 2) fighting in a tank in Afghanistan (son) 3) in the North Pole research facility 4) stranded on Gillians Island (humor) 5) lost at sea (many stories) 6) prison camp (WW1, WW2, Vietnam, etc. 7) sick from C19 ( this should be #1 ) All just my opinion. I did go shopping the other day and wanted to be safe...more humor. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
  17. 3 points
    Cracked jewel - if it reaches the inner edge will score the pivot and introduce friction. This is a modern movement built to tight tolerances and from the sounds of things, minimal sideshakes - get the same jewel as a replacement. Finally, listen to Nickelsilver. The most likely cause for issues is at the lower torque end of the movement, ie. the faster end, ie. towards the escapement. Mainspring barrels do not have to have so little friction that they can spin under their own momentum. They have greater side-thrust and hence have thicker, stronger pivots with more friction. But that matters less as there is more torque and less velocity..... One thing which I didn't see mentioned - did you check that your hairspring is not just "flat in the round" but also flat in general? When it breathes, you should not see any rippling up and downwards, and obviously no coils should ever touch. Sorry if that's obvious, but it's a very common issue on watches which have been mishandled. A hint can sometimes be that the balance oscillates faster than expected, especially in particular positions. The balance clearly swings freely which you demonstrated. You can experiment with adding friction at the different wheels - stick a fine oiler in the escape wheel oil sink and push against the pivot. You may be able to stop the movement entirely. Try the barrel.... see much difference? Probably not. When you observe the action of the escapement, check that with a few winds of the crown that the pallets are consistently getting the same amount of draw when they lock. If they don't draw inwards properly then it's most likely lack of torque getting through the train (friction?) or the sides of the pallet stones or escape teeth are not clean enough. You will sometimes need to inspect the stones and peg them or dip into pith wood to clean the sides.
  18. 3 points
    JohnR725

    watch circuit board

    I've attached a picture of of the variable power supply that I use of my own design. The meter on top is a Seiko meter of course not made by Seiko and citizen also use the same identical meter. Really nice it has a 12 µA full scale can easily read a quarter of a microamp. There is a minor modification though to get stable readings when looking at current going into quartz watch you need a capacitor so I modified an additive toggle switch on the front of the meter to turn that on and off. Then I found a couple of other links for you first one is the bowl of a meter and a variable voltage power supply. The second one is Building a Variable Voltage Power Supply - Martin Catt. http://members.iinet.net.au/~fotoplot/accps.htm http://www.pocketwatchrepair.com/catt/pwr-supply.php
  19. 2 points
    Hi Moose A cracking job well done, Its a bit daunting the first time as there are so many things to go wrong but with care and attention to detail its doable , so well done you, another lesson learned and another skill.
  20. 2 points
    Nucejoe

    Balance stops

    Distance between upper and lower end stones is less than the length of balance staff, whereas if should exceed it by .02 mm. this .02 is called the end shake. there are many ways to adjust for decent end shake. Shimming, whereby you put a shim of say aluminum foil underneath the balance cock then go on with tightening the cock screw. you can also move the lower jewel assembly outward, if it is movable.
  21. 2 points
    Marc

    Click ball trouble!

    I have successfully managed to replace these in the past using the ball from the nib of a ballpoint pen and a section of spring scavenged from a spring bar.
  22. 2 points
    FLwatchguy73

    Watch of Today

    Today I'm wearing my 1962 Timex Viscount with the grey crosshair dial. Yet another DOA resuscitation. Dial is a tad oxidized and the bracelet shreds my arm hairs, but otherwise it's great for nearly 60 years old.
  23. 2 points
    AndyHull

    Movement id?

    There are a few differences.The version I produced does seem to have slightly better OCR indexing. The Watchguy UK version only finds two instances of Busen for example, but the version I created finds three. Here is a zip file of the oldhippy version, but with a full OCR search capability. https://drive.google.com/file/d/1nJuWyxfnWSl5KoG7RU58knJChg_ZFfdI/view?usp=sharing Grab both version, and make up your own mind.
  24. 2 points
    Mainspring can't be changed. You need a new barrel with mainspring . Zodiac use a sealed for life barrel . Problem is they are rare and superhard to find. And 86 use a thinner mainspring because they are 36000 Hz movement so can't use a 72 or any other barrel.
  25. 2 points
    Scruffy, but interesting. It needs a crystal (obviously), and the case needs some work. I'm intrigued to see what is inside. Well within the 404 club entrance fee rules I might add.
  26. 2 points
    HSL

    Remontoir Cylindre 10 Rubis

    Today I was following the thread with a question about a locking nut for the crown wheel, since I already popped out the movement from the case I decided to take some shots of the adventure when servicing it and make my usual PDF.. Remontoir Cylindre 10 Rubis.pdf
  27. 2 points
    Marc

    Molniya 3602 movement

    The overcoil / terminal curve on your hair spring is way out of shape and doesn't appear to be between the regulator pins. The overcoil should cross over the top of the body of the hair spring (arrow A) and pass between the regulator pins (arrow B). Yours appears to go around the outside of the body of the hair spring rather like the terminal curve on a flat h/s and completely misses the regulator.
  28. 2 points
    StuartBaker104

    Where is my pallet fork?

    The pivots can be moved up and down in the cylinder to adjust end shake and the correct height of the cylinder in relation to the escape wheel. You may find a makers mark under the dial. If not you may be able to identify from the keyless works and the movement diameter. The case is a generic silver import carrying the mark for George Stockwell whose sponsors mark appears on many imported silver cases of this era.
  29. 2 points
    I'm quickly becoming a Timex Electric addict. Learning to service these. Easier than citizen Cosmotrons and Seiko Elnix, but fiddly to get the balance in with that magnet and contact Spring and pallet fork all fighting me! Only the fixed magnet versions with the crown on the rear. First tear down to remind me how to put it together.
  30. 2 points
    Hi FLwatchguy73, Same here. I have 2 Seagull 6497/6498 movements waiting for exercising stripdown, oiling and rebuild. I will do this while repeating course level 2. After that I will make watches out of them for more birthday presents. I also have a Swiss Unitas 6498 on hand, I am keeping it to make a B-type pilot's watch for myself. Here's the watch dial:
  31. 2 points
    HSL

    Where is my pallet fork?

    They look fair, who made it one probably can see when you strip it down , a while ago I posted a stripdown of a cylinder movement maby that can help you on the way..
  32. 2 points
    watchweasol

    Where is my pallet fork?

    It Is indeed a cylinder movement(no fork) the escape wheel operates directly on the balance staff (cylinder) which has cut outs to arrest the wheel, locking and unlocking basically the same as the fork/pallet.
  33. 2 points
    AndyHull

    Watch of Today

    Its a 1970s gold plated Caravelle "Set-O-Matic" automatic with quick change day today. It arrived without a crystal, and therefore the hands and dial are not perfect, but they responded well to a little TLC. I'm slowly working my way through the prospective 404 club candidates I picked up a few months back. This one came in at exactly the magic 404.
  34. 2 points
    jdm

    Work during the virus

    Not only you're late to this thread, but your chastising intervention is very out of place. Leave to us (Italians) the right to tell things as truly are in our country. Including correcting others when necessary, even if that will sound "patronizing" to your mannerism. Leave to us, the ones emotionally and practically affected, to decide the tone that we take to each other. Spare us your misplaced lecturing. I will take as you are the one which missed the encouragement to be respectful, or at least silent on this grave matter. If you have an issue with that, the report button is top right of every posting. I have my meals distribution shift today a 3pm. But no matter how spent, have all a nice day, stay safe, stay united.
  35. 2 points
    MarkK

    Show us your blue dial watches.

    Although, this watch may not count as a "blue watch", well maybe just a little bit... Here's my Poljot 'Civil' 3133 chronograph. Probably made in the 80s (USSR). The lunette is dark-blue surrounding the champagne sunburst dial. (The photo was taken by the seller.)
  36. 2 points
    MarkK

    Show us your blue dial watches.

    OMG: I really like that sapphire blue Seiko in the row of 4 watches above - So very attractive... I'll show you my Sturmanskie 31659 military pilot in turquoise blue... (photos taken by the seller)
  37. 2 points
    WATCHADDICT

    Show us your blue dial watches.

    Here is my only blue. TISSOT SEASTAR AUTOMATIC
  38. 2 points
    So, while I am waiting for the new case clamps to come. Let's test and adjust the timing on the Weishi. Before regulation the beat error was okay but dial-up it was running quite fast. I adjusted the watch for now to about +8sec/day. I will repeat the regulation after final assembly. Next steps: a) fix the movement using case clamps & screws; b) shorten the winding stem; c) regulate the movement (again); d) fix the wristband to the watch; e) test-run the watch for a few days to verify that its running fine! - to be continued -
  39. 2 points
    JohnD

    Show us your blue dial watches.

    Where do I start? In no particular order, here are a 'few'........ There are more........
  40. 2 points
    Me having the right tools is a bit like that Morecombe and Wise sketch with Andre Previn: “ I am playing all the right notes, but not necessarily in the right order.” Just substitute tools for notes.
  41. 2 points
    I purchased an Ever-Tite and the tension ring slid out easily. The chapter ring fit perfectly, if not a tiny bit more lose, that's why I had to glue mine in.
  42. 2 points
    Also, just my opinion, but from looking at your video, the freedom of movement which you are getting from the barrel when turning on its arbor is fine.
  43. 2 points
    If it's only a light scratch then you may be able to rest the pivot in a groove cut into a piece of hard wood and apply some metal polish like autosol. You would then hold and slowly rotate the wheel in one hand while pressing down on the pivot with a flat piece of pegwood or similar.
  44. 2 points
    Yes I also bought the star from VTA, the advantage is that he make it metalic so it's a permanent fix. I think they are out of stock though. If your star works then it is a perfect fix, and also permanent I think. Very good job Mike. Here's a video by Adrian showing how to install it:
  45. 2 points
    JerseyMo

    Work during the virus

    I'm ready to go out now ….
  46. 2 points
    jdm

    Work during the virus

    Please post in English only. Now, those that took the time to translate the above: What has been written is false. It is insulting to only think that Italians are "exhausted". Far from that, everyone is doing is his part, and nobody is left behind. Food and medicines are delivered by organized volunteers to the elder or quarantined. Families and individuals in need are already receiving food packs, and additional welfare money will be distributed within a week. It is just logical that non essential business are closed. However, beside food shop of any type and size, non-prescription medical, also hardware stores, electrical, plumbing, house items shops, tobacconist (they do a lot of additional services in Italy) and few more are open. And one can normally order online, post and couriers are doing a great job. I could go on with more details, if you are curious just ask. This battle is being won already. But whining doesn't help.
  47. 2 points
    This little escapement information could be of some help? (hope it's readable)
  48. 2 points
    watchweasol

    watch circuit board

    Hi The white tester is the Martin Catt build, The one with the meter attached is from Th AWCI and the other is a mini scope all got for less than £30 apiece the scope comes as a self build kit the other two are again assembled from others plans/drawings so food for thought. cheers
  49. 2 points
    oldhippy

    Hi from rookie Truls

    Thank you for your introduction and welcome to this friendly forum. I always recommend you start with a pocket watch. Just practice taking it apart and putting it together. Most are like a watch movement. Get to know the names of the parts as well. Don't touch the fusee pocket watches as those are completely different. Some thing like this is a good start.
  50. 2 points
    Jon

    Hi from rookie Truls

    Welcome, If I might suggest, that you don't go pulling apart your vintage, rather expensive watches you named in that list, until you buy some £10 - £20 watches and played around with those to get a feel for what you are doing. We are all here to help and before long you will have the confidence and a little more experience to tackle those watches you mentioned
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