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  1. I think we have become overly OCD about beat error. Before the invention of timegraphers, what did watchmakers do? They just line up the balance jewel with the pallet fork by sight and that was it. I think the error could be out by 1.0ms.
    6 points
  2. I have recently used a jacot tool to successfully re-polish a badly worn pivot in a pocket watch the first time in my life. I have watched Richard's videos about it and I also went to a book printed in the same year I was born in 1976. This book is written in Hungarian and was one of the book used by the state sponsored and only one watchmaker school as far as I understand. (To my knowledge you cannot learn watchmaking any longer in Hungary as of now.) I scanned the corresponding pages as how to re-finish a pivot including the usage of a jacot tool. It was a great help to me so I thought I share these pages with you. After scanning the pages i sent the pdf through a pdf to txt engine then sentence by sentence I translated the Hungarian text to English. I learnt watchmaking in English and it might sound strange but the Hungarian name of the parts and methods were unknown to me. This added some more difficulty on top of the fact that my English is far from perfect. I am writing this because I am not sure how good the end result is. If anyone feels that could correct the text so it would be more readable or would make better sense please do so. Enjoy if you can. jacot_tool.pdf jacot_tool_Kopasok_javitasa_magyar.txt jacot_tool_repairing_wear.txt
    5 points
  3. Was bored and nothing else to do so I finished these builds. The vintage pilot X caliber 3307, 40mm in pvd and stainless steel plus the 41mm Trench watch with a swiss caliber 6498 large sub seconds
    5 points
  4. I have a tool that moves the roller table in very precise increments for fine tuning the beat error. I only used it on one caliber I used to do for a small manufacturer, it's not terribly practical for everyday use. It has a table with a collet in the center that clamps on the roller table, then a finger clamp that holds the balance rim. The table turns around the collet, with index marks so you know how far you went. You can very easily turn the roller table a fraction of a degree, and then go back exactly the same if you want. For every day work, from the smallest ladies movements to marine chonometer, I set the balance with the cock on a bench block so the roller table is in a hole, balance on the block. Lift up the cock and move it over- not flipping it, just moving laterally, until I can see the slot in the hairspring collet, get in there and adjust (for tiny watches this is usually with an oiler, larger, a small screwdriver). Go back in the watch and check on the machine. If you have no idea which way to move, like when you are very close and the fork looks perfectly centered, you can check like this: let off all power, hold the balance rim, then nudge the center wheel so an escape tooth contact a pallet stone. See where it contacts. Rotate balance so an escape tooth can contact the other pallet stone, observe. This is with zero power on the watch so the balance really truly finds its neutral position. If, for example, a tooth hits the front part of the entry stone, and the last part of the exit stone, you can rotate the balance to see which way it needs to go (here the balance need to turn counter-clockwise from its rest state, so the hairspring needs to go clockwise).
    4 points
  5. Bulova Seaking Automatic from 1975 I believe. Just restored and serviced this for my next door neighbour. It's 'on test' for the next day. He told me he got it for his tenth wedding anniversary and has been in a drawer for 25 years or so. Going to give it back to him tomorrow evening. I hope he will be pleased to wear it again.
    4 points
  6. Google in their infinite wisdom has changed the link format for shared content. As a result the old links that I had shared on Google Drive no longer work correctly. Here is a new link to the Timex Documents collection, hopefully folks will spot this one first when they search. Timex Documents
    3 points
  7. This what I used to adjust the collets on clocks and pocket watches. It's probably too big for a ladies watch. I don't remember where I learnt this from I slip the tool between the hairspring and balance cock and insert the sharp tooth of the tool into the split of the collet. Then I can turn the collet in whatever direction I choose.
    3 points
  8. As correctly noted above the connector looks familiar but it's not what you're thinking it is. This is the one you want it fits perfectly.. https://www.ebay.com/itm/221445284681 I purchased the connectors for an unfinished project that would be helpful. The Chinese machines lack audio and the ability to listen to the watch especially if you're having problems is really important.. The ability to listen to the watch and see if it actually is an audio problem or something else. The easiest way to get audio from the timing machines is to hack the microphone.. Using a pair of the connectors you can make a pass through I would put it in a Metal box though so it shielded.. This way the microphone and continue to function like it's supposed to and you have access to everything you need to have audio. In other words it should be relatively easy if you have the time which I seem to be lacking to put an audio device on your timing machine and then listen to the watch and be unhappy with how horrible it can sound. Then I'm not joking about how horrible it can sound I have a horrible sounding watch currently at work I have to deal with it sounds very very bad... But at least in the audio I know why the timing machines unhappy with the watch. With the audio you take away a lot of the mysteries that you see on the timing machine. For testing purposes the watch should run just fine without lubricants. You might actually find the reality is a watch runs better without lubricants because all lubricants tend to have a dampening effect. On the other hand try to run your watch over long periods of time with out lubricant and see what effect that has it's usually not good. But there can be an issue with the lubrication of the escapement.. They get carried away with the 9415 then that's definitely an issue and will cause Amplitude loss as it tends to be sticky if it's applied way too heavily. The lubrication aspect is interesting because George Daniels was very very unhappy with Omega.. Look at the tech sheet for the coaxial escapement and you find lubrication but my understanding is it's not used as lubrication.. It's used to dampen the impact of the escapement but it still required. Defeating the whole purpose this escapement of not requiring a lubrication..
    3 points
  9. Winding wheel is missing a few teeth. Is the seller selling you this as genuine? Does he accept return?
    3 points
  10. .. and a small collection of NOS Morellato straps for a pocket money price, 'cos if you can never have enough watches, then it stands to reason that you can never have enough watch straps.
    3 points
  11. Finally got around to install the Indian vice on my new bench. Turns out that the base is actually chromed brass. I used wood inserts and SS socket screws. There weren't many choices but right above the drawer has the advantage that all I need to do is to open it and place a plastic bag to catch filings. After use it stays put in the same cardboard it came in. The red "visette" is another handy Cousins cheapie which I have already corrected for jaws and slide alignment, but I still have to find a way to fix on the thick bench.
    3 points
  12. I thought I'd give you something to ponder? Somewhere out there online I seen better pictures of one of these disassembled. But finding pictures at all is hard so this was the easiest one to find and it has a description which I thought you'd find interesting? The first stage uses cleaning fluid and ultrasonic basically standard cleaning of the watch. The second uses a fluid which gets distilled so it's nice and clean. Notice what kind of fluid this is? The third is even more interesting in that this is the surface treatment. Normally extremely expensive but here they use powdered steric acid that they vaporize. https://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/greiner-ultrason-cleaning-machine-465667345 Then there's another way to look at the isopropyl alcohol problem let's look at a group of people who love to dissolve their shellac they're not happy unless it's dissolved and let's see what they say about isopropyl alcohol. https://www.finewoodworking.com/forum/isopropyl-or-denatured-alcohol
    2 points
  13. Not at all- ethyl alcohol is the alcohol for dissolving shellac. As it is frequently abused, it's sold mostly as denatured alcohol or methylated spirits. The additives make it undrinkable but it functions quite well otherwise*. Other alcohols will dissolve it, but not as effectively. If shellac has softened from contact with alcohol, it will re-harden as the alcohol evaporates, this is the basis for shellac finishes for wood. Denatured/methylated is also the right alcohol for an alcohol lamp- aka spirit lamp in the U.K. The above mention of boiling out in a test tube is because there's a big difference between softening shellac and completely removing it. I used to go to the trouble of completely removing it when setting up an escapement, only re-applying once I was happy with my stone positions. Nowadays I don't bother. But I found that even a long, like 30 minute or more soak at room temperature usually left some remnants, thus the boiling. (the test tube allows you to point the end far from the flame- even so I have ejected a plume of flame along with a fork before!) * There are no real standards as to what is done to "denature" ethyl alcohol. So sometimes it's cut with water to bulk it up, and sometimes mixed with some cheaper (and poisonous) methyl alcohol- thus the U.K. name, and usually has a couple to several other chemicals added to make it very unappealing or even deadly to drink, and difficult to separate the ethyl back out through normal distillation methods. I have noticed that some brands burn very poorly in my alcohol lamps, in spite of being sold as lamp fuel. Some burn very well. Probably more water in the poor one.
    2 points
  14. Hello fellow members, hope you all are well. And I hope your families are well during these times.
    2 points
  15. Thanks all for the help! Great suggestions. Turns out I have an old set of feeler gauges that I could use for this. Will post the outcome and let everyone know how it goes.
    2 points
  16. @VWatchie the mass of the impulse jewel may be offset by the cut out, but if it is it's likely more by accident than by design. The balance wheel is poised (either static or dynamic poising) with the roller table in-situ. Unless the roller table it's self has been poised in isolation, the orientation of the roller table will be accounted for when the balance wheel/roller table assembly is poised as a unit. If you then change the orientation of the roller table relative to the balance wheel, you will then upset the poise of the assembly.
    2 points
  17. Together with the moving piece, which also has an angle, pretty much the same, they will hold the watch in place when turned upside down, for DD position.
    2 points
  18. Yes, it's made from a piece of stainless steel wire. I copied it from a photo I saw of a vintage tool for adjusting beat error.
    2 points
  19. This lever is not parallel to the wheel, so it stops the pin on the wheel at an angel so it could cause it to jump which can cause the strike to act up. Way to much solder on the hammer causing to much weight. A very bad soldering job.
    2 points
  20. t's more about "how" things are done rather than going by canned statements. For example, if you mark the balance rim and then clean it with a small brush, the solvent doesn't even get close to where shellac is. Beside, alcohol softening shellac is not instantaneous. Mainly because of the small balance. When a ladies movement is a good timekeeper, that is a manufacturing or adjustment achievement bigger than with a men one. If you go in person to a professional with a ladies watch for service or repair, watch their face and be prepared to hear interesting comments.
    2 points
  21. You can either turn the roller table or hairspring or as said unpin the hairspring and run it through the stud hole. Putting the cock and balance back on the mainplate without anything else gives you a good view of impulse jewel which is to be in midpoint between the banking pins. Turning the hairspring is the riskiest. I turn the roller table instead, I put it on the staff a bit loose so turning be easy, once I call it in beat , I then press the roller table all the way home. Ink marking the balance for a referance point on one edge of the cock is useful.
    2 points
  22. With a fixed stud carrier (and no pics of the movement to refer to) I'm pretty sure you've hit upon the only way. I often work on antiques, and with one little size 0s Swiss cylinder watch - a gift for my wife - to correct the beat error I had to un-pin the pinned hairspring and let it out just a tiny bit, then adjust the collet by teeny tiny increments, repeating this procedure until it was finally in beat and able to be regulated. And it's good to be extremely worried about damaging the hairspring. We all should be. Always. Fragile it is. Take your time on it. Know how much force you are applying, and in what direction. Be mindful and don't go any faster than you are comfortable with. Practice will make you better with time. Good luck. May we see some pictures of the movement please? We always enjoy them.
    2 points
  23. Hi everyone, Im new here Just get back into pocket watches after selling out 5yrs ago. Acquired this nice RR watch a week ago, it is now getting a full cleaning, oil, adjust service in NYC...likely another week till I get this beauty home. 23J Illinois Bunn Special Illinois 18-size 23-jewel Bunn Special w/ DS Montgomery dial. 1913 date 25- year,Gold-filled Keystone re-case, glass crystal. i am now retired and dabbling with Idea of online watch repair training...really to the basic tear down Cleaning adjust, replace spring level.
    2 points
  24. I think we can concur what happened is what jdm has said the spring broke at the most stressed point, a previous repairer has removed the spring and re punched the hole but not bothered to reform the coil as it would require the spring to be annealed and reformed, a cheap repair that would work untill the spring slipped the arbour and would not re engage. a new mainspring is required to complete the job.
    2 points
  25. and just who is it that you are referring to?
    2 points
  26. For a flat polished screw, I prefer to see them with whatever is left of the original finish; when you start filing on them that itself raises burrs so it's all or nothing. I get really irritated when I see a buffstick job on formerly flat screws. That's just my opinion though.
    2 points
  27. Which is also why the so called hollow shape in the picture by OH is not superior. The blade will contact evenly only if it's wide exactly as the slot. Whilst the wedge profile will be in full length contact with slots of different width, as long there is no interference to the bottom.
    2 points
  28. Oh yes! Here are some more: https://www.enstock2e.top/products.aspx?cname=hublot+classic+fusion+ultra+thin+skeleton Picture of the back of one too from this page. Very convincing for $82. The fact the OP didn't post a link to the selling site; that the obvious question on selling price has been ignored; and there are clearly fakes out there all screams alarm bells. @Rishah- did you get your watch? how much was it? is it $???? well spent? is it ticking nicely along at 28,800bph etc?
    2 points
  29. A couple of weeks ago I received my first IOSS purchase, that is a small tool from a reputable Ebay UK seller. The label clearly indicated "VAT Paid IOSS xxxzzz", notwithstanding this my national post charged an accessible €5.90 as customs handling fees - no VAT was charged. That is clearly not in the intent of the program, but unless the EU mandates that no additional fees on IOSS can be charged (and I doubt that will happen), I'm afraid that any postal administration, and private courier will still continue to charge as they please. Their justification is that current regulations state that "any package presented to customs" is charged handling fees. In contrast, the Chinese (AliExpress) already do better than that. They charge VAT at time of purchase, and ship all EU orders to a centralized hub in the Netherlands, where they clear customs and combine multiple packages to a same customer when possible. The shipment is then made from the EU and no charges are due at delivery.
    2 points
  30. I reopen this topic because i made a bezel with my resin 3d printer that is acceptable.
    2 points
  31. No. A small discrepancy in width is not that important, what it is instead is that a regular wedge shaped driver blade will not touch the bottom of the slot. If it does, it will easily cam out. We don't say that the driver is sharpened, we say it's dressed, I find that the latter term better reflects the care one exercises. Now, since there are screws of the same head diameter but different width slots, that can mean you have to keep two drivers, one with a wider tips and one with a narrower one. Check and further discuss this subject in the topic below
    2 points
  32. Yes Steffen Pahlow is at the top of his tree when it comes to watchmaking. He has a wonderful workshop and his set up is out of this world. You should watch all his videos he is the master.
    2 points
  33. It's still tripping so check the lever and the pin in the wheel and make sure the lever holds the wheel and pin. As it's a count wheel strike are you sure the lever that drops into the count drops right down in the slots and lines up with the wheel with the pin.
    2 points
  34. Recently retired and inherited a large collection of clocks and watches together with horological tools. My parents - Alan and Rita Shenton were legends in the electric clock world and horological books - back in the day. Looking forward to honing my amateur skills skills to renovate and learn more form like minded enthusiasts
    2 points
  35. Most damage is caused by bad fitting screwdrivers. This is what I used to do with clock screws. Remove all the burr using various needle files, re-cut the slot using a slotting file. Polish the head in my lathe using various enemy sticks then burnish. If the screw needs bluing than that is carried out. Also with clocks if the bottom of the screw is showing that is also polished and burnished. You can do the same with watch screws the only difference is the scale.
    2 points
  36. Unless you suspect it is causing an issue then no. Removing involves removing the friction fitted parts and replacing back to the correct depth.
    2 points
  37. I just finished a similar project, and wanted to put an update here on the crystal, to help future searchers. The Sternkreuz FBA 321.701 is also a good replacement for this watch. The GS CY 934-17 is not. I was able to source the Sternkreuz through Cousins. Here's a photo of the completed watch. Happy jumping! Dave
    2 points
  38. Just curious... did you lubricate the pallet jewels or the escape wheel teeth?
    2 points
  39. Here is a very big lathe, wife to scale!
    2 points
  40. You do this test dial-down. Firstly, you get a feel for how far the balance rim will move. But remember that slight side-shake will also allow it to tilt. You will be able to see the pivot move upwards into the jewel hole in the balance cock. If a chaton has been pushed outwards (increasing end shake) then you may sometimes actually find that the cap jewel spring does not appear secure against the cap jewel. It doesn’t prove which end has moved. That requires further investigation such as inspecting balance rim clearance against the plate and the interface between the roller and pallet fork.
    1 point
  41. yes you are supposed to place the watch directly in the timing machine microphone if you want the best pickup. fter all that split the microphone holder was designed for is designed to hold watches movements in particular. There is a minor problem for the Chinese isn't designed the best but still that's what it's designed for. Sometimes it doesn't matter who's movement holder Chinese are Swiss if you hold a complete watch that sometimes is problematic. Because the jaws are specifically designed to grab the edge of the movement the dial side in particular. A complete watch like a pocket watch for instance has rounded edges in the case and sometimes that doesn't work well. and no matter what you do want to be careful that it actually is in the microphone and not at some weird angle are on the edge or something else then it could pop out.
    1 point
  42. I agree with @jdm (lo and behold! )! Try to increase or decrease the gain. I think you might find this post (or the entire thread) informative. Let us know if it helped!
    1 point
  43. Try adjusting gain control.
    1 point
  44. as it was a new old stock movement did you put it on the timing machine before you service? then why did you replace the mainspring barrel? Then it appears to be your holding the watch in the timing machine in the movement holder why are you not holding the watch in the timing machines holder directly?
    1 point
  45. Purchased a new one from Cousins. There is however an issue while on test overnight it stopped. After a lot of fiddling I stripped down again and found a tooth broken off the barrel. I normally check all of the wheels and pivots when I strip with my microscope but it’s light ring had broken and so I did not inspect closely. My mistake and since found the fault re microscope it’s light source is via fibre optics cable and the units projector lamp had failed. The new lamp and barrel are on order. what fun
    1 point
  46. The mere vibrations destroy pivot hanging in solution. No need to vibrate against anything. Regs
    1 point
  47. Are you by any chance trying to regulate using the fine regulator adjustment rather than move if the arm which carries the index pins directly?
    1 point
  48. I didn't see a "media" sub-forum so I hope this is an OK place to post this. I just finished watching this documentary about George Daniels and Roger Smith. I read "All in Good Time" over the summer and enjoyed this documentary as well and wanted to share it with you all. https://www.amazon.com/gp/video/detail/B06Y39YSC4/ref=atv_dp_share_cu_r
    1 point
  49. Cut a 5-6cm round from a credit card. On top of it place a round of 280 grip wet paper if there are deep scratches or dings. This is held on a mandrel in the rotary tool. which is much better if is hold horizontal by some support. Place a cup of water under the work and dip often. Set low speed. Better to keep the glass in the watch otherwise you risk it to fly away and chip it. Keep the watch as much as vertical as possible, Look well where the wheel is grinding. You want it to go where the scratch is, by including the watch just a little but, not just anywhere around. As you practice, you will be able to recognize when grinding in the right spot , as the white streaks (that is glass) shape differently on a scratch. Replace papers as needed, like once or twice, it will be difficult to tell because the glass will be very hazed, but try your best. When sure all is gone switch to 600 grid and polish where you worked before, again no need to go all around. Glass will be still hazed, but less. Next, do not waste time with finer paper, use an hard felt wheel, 50 x 15mm, and cheap oil diamond paste. This time you will be working with the outer wall, not the face of the wheel like before. For quick work you can use a single grade like 20, finer than that does not make much of a difference. The way you do it is to place a little paste toward you, and draw from that gradually with the wheel. Clean well with dish detergent. Very likely you will see more defects, in which case you will have to go back to wet paper. It takes practice to do all the above right but in my experience the paper/paste combo is the faster and most effective method. but after you mastered all the steps you can bring a terrible glass to perfection in 45-60 minutes.
    1 point
  50. In my experience, if doing this by hand, it simply takes a long time. Dremel type tools are much quicker, but take a bit of practice to get the technique sorted. With acrylic you can use pretty much any abrasive, including toothpaste if the scratches are light, and you will usually get results in only a few minutes. With mineral glass, you require harder abrasives and more time. With sapphire, you will need probably need to to use diamond pastes, and it will take longer still. If you search this forum, you will find a number of good threads on the subject. For glass and sapphire, you can polish by hand, but it takes forever, you will almost certainly need to use a Dremel or similar. If you are using polishing disks in a power tool, you need to run them at a relatively low speed. There are a number of youtube videos about this too, most of which are trying to sell you their whizz bang product, but the technique is the important point in these videos. The brand of the abrasive is not really important.
    1 point
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