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  1. Valjoux / ETA 7751 Triple calendar moon-phase; This gold-plated Berney-Blondeau S.A. with an ETA 7751 belonged to a German gentleman who received it new on his 60th birthday in 1995. Through the years he kept the original box, the warranty card as well as the 1995 price-list and the dealer’s business card. He has worn the watch only on social accessions and the watch spent most of its time stored in a "Panzerschrank". According to the original price-list, the 1995 purchase price was 1450 CHF. As you can see, the watch held up pretty well, only a few small scratches in the front- and rear mineral-glass crystal and on the top of the lugs some of the gold-plating has worn through. The watch ran, all function did work. It had never been serviced nor opened Disclaimer; This walk-through is written in the way I do it. That's not to say it's the most correct way of doing things but as they say: there are many ways to Rome, all leading to the same result. Neither do I, as a hobbyist, have fancy horological equipment such as a cleaning machine or a "sterile" & "dust-free" room and therefor the end result will not be "Rolex"-standards. All I can say is that I'm always give it my best shot and I will mention problems encountered or were I went wrong, so you don't have to Without any further ado, let's dig into this beautiful & complicated watch ...... First make sure that you downloaded the latest ETA 7751 "Technical Communication". Throughout this walk-through I'll use the same parts reference numbers as used in the "Technical Communication". Below the currently latest September 2021 version; 7751 manual.pdf Before having done anything to the watch, I tested all the functions for proper working and took the timegrapher readings to see if there was anything which needed special attention. These readings can later be compared with the readings after the service. Dial-Up; Dial-Down; Crown-Right; Crown-Down; Crown-Left; Crown-Up; From the readings, it's clear to see that the watch needed a proper service. The back-lid, just like the front-crystals found on pocket-watches, required a knife-type case-opener. Checked out the oscillating weight ball-bearing, it had next to no play and therefor good for another round. Removed the oscillating weight (48). Removed the two casing-screws and clamps, pulled the stem and flipped the case over onto a soft pillow. With the watch-case removed, the winding stem re-inserted and the movement was placed in a proper 7750 (or family) movement-holder. To me, working on these movements a proper movement-holder is paramount. During the disassembly of the movement I encountered some problems and without this holder I most likely would have made scratches or worse..... Pulling the 8x hands; they all came off without any problems. All the hands safely nicely stored in a small plastic container. The same counts for the dial, after the removal directly stored in a plastic container with on both sides of the dial a soft lining. Removal of the Day & Month indicator disk (78) and the Moon phase indicator (79) The keen observer may have noticed that there are no screws next to the movement holder, for example the two screws holding the Day & Month indicator respectively. When working on complicated movements or movements which I'm not familiar with, I took on the habit, when possible, to replace the screws in the same hole as they came from. For sure, it's more work, but some movements do have multiple types/sizes screws and it will become a big puzzle if you store them in the same container / basket. Replacing the screws works (most of the time) very well for me, but in some cases the replaced screws shoulder-out deeper than as they would have done when holding the part above. The protruding screw may touch parts below or when replacing bridges, prevent the bridge from not seating fully "level". To me, replacing the screws thoughtfully is far simpler than facing a huge sorting puzzle later. Removal of the combined maintaining plate (76) and the Month star driving wheel (77). The three tiny screws holding the maintaining plate (76) were extremely tight. I couldn't loosen them with my standard (new) screwdriver bits so I had to grind the screwdriver bit to match the exact the same shape as the screw-grooves. Only then, with "force", they came loose and I was glad for having a proper movement-support! One slip of the screwdriver, with the force that was required, could / would have easily made a deep score in the plate or worse ........ Removal of the Day jumper spring (71), Day & Month jumper (70), Day jumper (72) and the Moon phase yoke (73) plus an early warning ! With those parts out of the way, the Moon phase platform (75) had to come off. Assuming that the with the arrow highlighted screw was one of the screws holding the platform down, I turned the screw only to discover that it was the moon-phase corrector eccentric ....... Oops !! The setting of the eccentric has to be checked at the end anyway, but now I know for sure that it's set wrongly. Removal of the Moon phase jumper (69), Corrector maintaining small plate (66) and the Moon phase jumper spring (67). Still in the picture the Date & Month jumper (74) which should have been removed before this picture was taken. The original stem was replaced by a longer stem to adjust the Calendar driving wheel (61) which was holding the Date-star (63) down. Removal of the Date-star (63, shown in the previous picture) together with the Date-corrector (65) and the corrector maintaining small plate (66). Removal of the calendar platform (62). Slowly back to familiar ground; a standard ETA 7750 starts to appear ... Removal of the Hour wheel 24hrs H1 (59), the Calendar driving wheel (61), the Hour-wheel (60), the Day corrector (58) and the Day corrector spring (57). The removal of the Hammer-spring (56), Set hour-hammer operating lever (53 & 54), Hour counter lock (55), Hour counting wheel (52), Minute-wheel (51) and the free Cannon pinion (50). Pulling of the Driving pinion (49) has to be done carefully; either with a pair of hand-levers or two small screw-drivers. The upwards force on either side of the pinion has to the equal or you may break the pinion of the great wheel (16) (a previous experience has taught me so !! ) Flip the movement over and from here on I'm using a Bergeon 4040 movement holder. First the removal of the Hammer-spring (45). When removing this spring I had up till now difficulties avoiding making a small mark in the Automatic device bridge (44). It was our WRT-member "Nickelsilver" who tipped me off using a piece of Scott tape over the edge of the bridge. This worked very well and for the first time I was able to remove the hammer without leaving a mark! Thanks Nickelsilver! The hammer-spring (45) and the Clutch-spring (47) removed. Remove the Auto device bridge (44). Removal of the Reversing wheel; (43), Reduction wheel (41), the Clutch (40), Oscillating pinion (39), the Hammer (42), Chronograph wheel (37), Minute-counting wheel (38), Minute-counting jumper (46), the Lock (33), the Operating-lever (36) and the Minute counting driving wheel (19). Removal of the Chronograph bridge (34), the Friction spring (32) and the Operating lever spring (35). After the removal of the Ratchet wheel driving wheel (33) it's time to release any residual power in the main-spring. This can be done by holding the crown, lift the Click-spring (20) and slowly release the tension by slipping the crown through your fingers. Removal of the Chronograph cam (29), Cam jumper (28), Detent (30), Ratchet wheel (23), Crown wheel core (22) and Crown wheel (21). Removal of the Balance Assembly (26+27), Pallet bridge (25) and Pallet fork (24). Removal of the Barrel bridge (18). Removal of the power-train; the Great wheel (16), Third wheel (15), Second wheel (14), Escape wheel (13), the Movement barrel (12) and the Stop lever (17). Flip the movement over for disassembling the keyless works. Removal of the Setting lever jumper (11) together with the Intermediate setting wheel (10), the Time setting gear (9), Rocking bar (8), Yoke (6), Setting lever (5), Winding stem (4), Winding pinion (2), Sliding pinion (3) and the Yoke spring (7). All the parts safely stored in a compartmentalized box with lid, ready for cleaning & demagnetizing. Regarding the "wear & tear" of all the watch-parts; it was clear to see that the watch hadn't seen a lot of use. The Oscillating weight ball-bearing (48) was good, reversing wheel (43) looked good etc. However, I decided to change out the main-spring. This type of barrel has a lid which cannot be "pushed" open. To open the lid, I place a sharp knife in the groove between the barrel and the lid and while pressing down on the knife roll the barrel, in my case on a "soft" leather underground to avoid doing any damage. This widens the groove into a small gap and with the smallest screwdriver one can pry, going around the barrel, the lid off. When done carefully you won't leave any marks. Barrel & Arbor cleaned, braking-grease applied ready for the new spring. Apart from a few (see "technical communication" !) the parts were soaked for 24hrs in Zippo lighter fluid and pegged; all the sprockets, pivots and jewels. Thereafter all the parts were checked for magnetism. Instead of using the unreliable compass method, I'm using an App called "Lepsi" on my iPhone. This App doesn't tell you how much magnetism there is, it only indicates whether there is any. The distance of the object above the screen, by which magnetism is detected, gives you some indication of the strength of the magnetic field, but nothing more. For me, when magnetism is detected, that's enough to "Zap" the part on my no-nonsense self-build demagnetizer. Of course, in reality the demagnetizer is not placed anywhere near my iPhone or the other watch-parts / metal-objects like here on the photo. Also it may be a good idea to take your watch off during the "zapping” operations! Quite a few parts, particularly in the calendar works, were magnetized. With the main-plate anti-shock Chaton cleaned, pegged, cap-stone oiled and re-installed in the main-plate (1), the assembly of the 7751 can begin. Escape wheel (13), Second-wheel (14), Third-wheel (15), Main-spring barrel (12), Great-wheel (16) and Stop-lever (17). Installation of the barrel-bridge (18) (by a 7750 the wheel-train the and barrel-bridge are combined in one bridge). Make sure that all the wheels turn fine before tightening the screws; check, check and double check. Again, if you using the re-installed screws method, some screws may protrude the bridge. (I took the "warning picture" below a little later, so don't look at any additional installed parts) All the Lubrications as per the ETA 7751 "Technical Communication". These two re-installed screws do protrude the Barrel bridge (18). The one on the left will touch the Great-wheel (16) and the one to the right may just touch the main-spring barrel (12). Back them out far enough so they don't cause any trouble. The installation of the Crown-wheel (21), Crown-wheel core (22) and the Ratchet-wheel (23). With the movement turned over, installation of the keyless works; Sliding-pinion (3), Winding pinion (2), Winding-stem (4), Setting-lever (5), Yoke-spring (7), Rocking-bar (8), Yoke (6) and placing of the Time setting gear (9) before placing the Intermediate setting wheel (10) and Setting lever jumper (11) as a "combination". Keyless work completed. Check for proper working! Installed the pallet-fork (24) and the complete balance assembly (26 & 27). Cleaned, pegged the balance Chaton and oiled the cap-stone. Before going any further with the assembling, I tested the power-train and escapement for any irregularities. On the timegrapher the readings were looking a whole lot better than initially. Instead of picturing each position, here are the readings; DU & DD both 292-294 degrees, 0 ms and 0 s/d. CU: 244, 0.1, -14 s/d CR: 249, 0.2, -16 s/d CD: 252, 0.1, -6s/d CL: 262, 0.0, -5 s/d Even though I adjusted the Etachron as good as I could, that's to say centring the hairspring between the two regulator pins and thereafter reducing the regulator pins gap to the point that the hairspring could still, but just "breath", the positional deviation with max. 16 seconds is slightly higher than I was hoping for. Then again, it's not a chronometer grade and each position produced straight lines, so I think that with some daily-rate adjustments the watch will run just fine. Once satisfied with the running of the power-train and the escapement, the assembly of the chronograph can start. Cam jumper (28), Chronograph cam (29), Detent (30), Minute counter driving wheel 30 minutes (19), Lock (33), Operating lever spring (35) and the Operating lever (36). As said; lubrication as per "Technical Communication" and test the proper function of the start/stop and reset levers. Placement of the Ratchet wheel driving wheel (31) and the Friction spring chronograph wheel (32). Install the chronograph bridge (34); don't forget the lubricate the Reversing wheel jewel on the bottom of the chronograph bridge before placement. Also pay attention to the reset-lever, it has to be pushed in so the bridge can sit level & flush. Check the working of the Ratchet driving wheel (31) and the reset lever before tightening the bridge screws. The placement of a well lubricated Reduction wheel (41), Minute counter jumper (46), Oscillation pinion (39, biggest sprocket down), seconds recording Chronograph wheel (37), Minute counting wheel (38), the Clutch (40), make sure that the oscillation pinion pivot is engaged), Reversing wheel (43) and finally the Hammer (42) before the Automatic device bridge (44). Before installing the Automatic device bridge (44), lubricate the jewel for the seconds recording Chronograph wheel underneath the bridge. The installation of the Automatic device bridge can be very tricky. It's very easy to touch the Clutch (40) and the pivot of the Oscillation pinion comes out. Before inserting or tightening the bridge screws, double-check the placing and working of every component!! Once the bridge is installed and with the relevant lubrication done, before mounting the hammer-spring (45) and the Clutch-spring (47), all the functions of the chronograph can be checked & tested; the engagement of the oscillation pinion, the smooth running of the seconds recording chronograph wheel, the advancing of the minute counting wheel, the start/stop- and reset-levers etc. Next is the installment of the Hammer-spring (45) and Clutch-spring (47). To prevent scratches on the Automatic device bridge (44), as per brilliant idea of WRT member "Nickelsilver", a piece of Scotts tape was taped over the edge of the bridge. With the installment of those two springs, the assembly of the chronograph is completed Movement flipped over and placed in the 775x movement holder. Installment of a well lubricated Driving pinion (49), The Cannon-pinion (50), the Minute wheel (51), Hour counting wheel (52), Set hour operating lever (53+54), Hour counter lock (55) the Hammer spring (56), the Day corrector spring (57) and the Day corrector (58). The build-up, up till the Day corrector spring (57) and the Day corrector (58), was identical as to a standard 7750. The Hour wheel 24hrs (59) drops over the Second wheel (14) pivot. Attention: Sadly, no picture but when installing the Hour wheel (60) over the Cannon pinion, one has to lift the Minute wheel (51) slightly and to make sure that the hour wheel teeth do engage in the small minute wheel sprocket. Once they engage, both wheels can be lowered in place. Finally, before installing the Calendar platform (62) the Calendar driving wheel (61) with the "day finger" pointing as shown. From here on I pulled the winding stem to stop the running of the movement and thereby avoiding the advancement / altering of the positions of the wheels. The installation of the Calendar platform (62) can be a bit tricky. It's all too easy to dislodge the hour lever (53) and the Hammer spring (56). Make sure that the platform sits flush with the Main plate (1) before tightening the 3x screws. Place the Day star (63) as shown in both above pictures. Placing of Date + Month jumper (70), the Day + Month jumper (74) (Both jumpers are identical), Day jumper (72), Moon phase yoke (73), Day jumper spring (71), Date corrector (65), Corrector maintaining small plate (66), Moon phase corrector (68), Moon phase jumper (69) and Moon phase jumper spring (67). Installation of the Moon phase platform (75), the Combined maintaining plate (76) (Be aware that the top of the Combined maintaining plate slides in the gap of the Day Star) and the placing of the Month star driving wheel (77). Placing the Month & Day indicator disk (78) and the Moon phase indicator (79). Adjusting the Phase corrector eccentric (64) wasn't that hard as I feared. By adjusting the eccentric one determines the "depth" of the Date corrector (65), shown by the blue arrows. Set too high and the top-sprocket of the Date corrector (65) won't even touch the Moon phase corrector (68). Set too deep the top-sprocket of the Date corrector will jam the Moon phase corrector (68) into the Moon phase indicator. The "depth" has to set such that the sprocket of the Date corrector (65) pushes the Moon phase corrector (68) just far enough so that it will just advance the Moon phase indicator by one click before the top Date corrector (65) sprocket releases the Moon phase corrector (68). There is clear information about the Moon phase corrector "depth" setting in the ETA 7751 "Technical Communication". With all parts installed and tested as far as possible, the dial goes back on. Before re-installing the hands, I re-lumed the minute & hour hand with new high-class LumiNova. Both hands now re-lumed and drying before the installation. Placing the long Date indicator hand required a bigger size hand-pusher which I didn't have. The idea was born to cut a tweezer protector-cap from the top until the required size was obtained. Stuck to protector cap onto the handle of a diamond file for more stability / pushing-power. It worked like a treat Turn the date quick-set until the month indicator disk changes month, that will be the first (1) day of the new month. The rest of the hands (8! in total) to be set at 24:00 midnight when the day indicator disk changes. Detailed instructions about the "shift tolerances" are described in the ETA 7751 "Technical Communication". All the hands installed and correctly set on the month / day / date and moon phase. The 18th of January 2022 had a full moon. The German gentleman received the watch when he turned 60 in 1995, now I'll continue with his watch as from my (65th ) birthday in January 2022 I'm still awaiting new crystals and once the case has been restored, I'll add the final picture of the fully restored/serviced watch. I really enjoyed working on this watch and I do hope that my write-up will be of some use to somebody, at some point in time! Regards: Endeavor, Denmark
    8 points
  2. Here it is. Unlikely this will be the ultimate configuration.
    5 points
  3. Sure, I'll go and chop down one of'em and try to burn it on top of my kitchen-range. All part of the "Great Reset" that will make us all happy. I.e. the super rich elite governing the world through politicians.
    4 points
  4. I would put a pair of timing washers on, opposing screws, this is exactly what they are made for.
    4 points
  5. Been working on another Vulcain Cricket. This is a rebuild from a rusty start and a donor watch (also a rusty watch). The hand was floppy on the cannon pinion. Not sure how that happened--was not my fault--the watch came to me in pieces (the last guy gave up I guess). In one of my watchmaking books, there was a mention of using a jeweling tool to close the hand tube, so that is what I did. Of course...as delicate as I was, I overshot and ended up having to use a staking tool to open it back up slightly. Got it now. I have two of these Seitz tools. One has a base hole of 3mm and the other 4mm. I only had one solid stump and it was a 3mm one. I prefer the 4mm tool, so I just let the stump "float" for this exercise.
    3 points
  6. If you want to download a newer version of the technical document you can do it at the link below. https://shopb2b.eta.ch/mecaline/7751-7751-11.html
    3 points
  7. Hi All, Im relatively new at this and have been playing about with random junker watches over lock down and enjoying the hobby. I wanted a vintage divers watch to add to my growing collection and found this item on Ebay. It was a bit of a mess on the outside but but inside was a nice ETA 25 jewel 2452 with a bit of service history etched on the backplate. The stem was broken, the crystal was shot and the rotating bezel was cemented with what I can only guess was wrist-cheese. It also looked as if a metal, expanding bracelet had been fitted in the past and had worn grooves on the inside lug faces. The surface of the case was brushed but covered in scratches. I know ppl frown upon case polishing but this watch was going to be mine and I like shiny watches so removed the stem tube and polished it up. The dial was almost immaculate - I wanted to relume the markers but the numbers were printed on top of the lume so I left them alone. The lume on the hands was starting to disintegrate so I figured I would have a go at reluming those (my first attempt at reluming - not totally happy with the result). Ultimately I want to replace the bezel but Im finding it harder than I thought to find one the right size that isnt going to cost more than the watch itself! After movement cleaning I got a nice line with an amplitude of about 280 but a beat error of 1.0 which needs looking in to... Anyway I hope you like the pics!
    3 points
  8. Welcome here. Since you have already hands on experience you should be able to do a lot before more training is needed, then when it comes to that I recommend the high quality one by our Host Mark Lovick at watchfix.com
    3 points
  9. I just recently, and for the first time, used the same trick to get the case back off an Enicar Ocean Pearl having the same type of case back. It just wouldn't budge using my Jaxa tool and my sturdy case holder. Why anyone would screw on a case back that hard is beyond me, but perhaps it is necessary to preserve the water resistance!? I usually just use my suction grip ball to tighten the case back and then a final touch with my Jaxa tool to make sure. Anyway, I used Epoxy glue, and it probably was an overkill as it took many hours to dissolve it in acetone. Superglue is likely a better option. The case back just wouldn't budge using my Jaxa tool despite having a good grip. Using Epoxy glue was a probably an overkill. Using a wrench the case back still wouldn't budge but instead the jaws on my sturdy watch case holder started to give. Luckily the lugs fitted more or less precisely in my vise. It took many hours dissolve the Epoxy in acetone. Superglue is probably a better option.
    3 points
  10. I invent tools for myself Ive not seen or improvements to available ones. These are two different gauges I've come up with. The pin with the white head has a hairspring collet as a stop. You can measure and transfer the length or depth of the work on a micro scale. It works really well for lengths of arbors while turning. The other two taper pins are made from sewing needles turned down. You use a permanent marker or ink marker to darken the needle. GENTLY put it into a jewel or a bushing and twist a couple of times. This will make a witness mark you can then pull out and measure the diameter of where it falls on the pin. You can see in the image where the ink was rubbed away at the tips. You would measure the shiny metal right where the ink stops to get your hole diameter. Both of these easy to make tools have helped me out many times.
    2 points
  11. Hi I believe from other posts that tapping it out is the correct way. I would be inclined to make a sliding punch. Hollow brass rod that fits snugly over the canon pinion and another brass punch that fits in the hollow rod/guide. Being brass it wont damage the pinion surface and the guide rod will ensure a srtaght impact so no chance of bending the pinion either.
    2 points
  12. It depends? If the watch seems to run in other words the hairspring and balance wheel are compatible enough that the watch can actually run then we just need some timing adjustments to the balance wheel. In other words may be some tiny balance screws would work. I wouldn't say the balance is destined to definitely go away until a proper evaluation can be done. Basically we just need someone to a proper evaluation that has access to the proper timing machine that can time things that are grossly out of frequency. Plus may be evaluated multiple of positions just to make sure there aren't any other problems.
    2 points
  13. I have just serviced this Swiss made golf scorer. The main interest to a watchman is that the reset of the scores is done by turning the crown a full circle and each score is reset by the 'hammer' labelled A in exactly the same way as the second and minute hand flyback resets of a chronograph.
    2 points
  14. If you had a blowtorch you should Be able to melt the brass and get the jewels free. Unless of course you're trying to service the watch then this would be a really bad idea. I'm assuming this is your first pocket watch? What you want to do is loosen the stud screw push the stud out a little bit not too far so it's loose remove the balance bridge remove the balance wheel Keeping the hairspring on the balance wheel of course. Because if you going to clean the watch you have to take the balance wheel out anyway. To understand the jewels I have a picture. The jewels are burnished into brass settings. This is why blowtorch would be a bad idea because you want to keep them in the settings. Then because I was too slow to answer somebody beat me to the answer with nice pictures I think you get an idea of how it all goes together or comes apart
    2 points
  15. I like my tweezers to have a very light touch, (soft and mushy). This gives me better tactile feedback and better control of small objects like balance jewels and small screws. I don't own a single Dumont or Bergeon. All my tweezers are cheap tweezers but modified and tweaked to my preference. The jaw opening and closing force can be tailored to an individual's preference by grinding down the thickness of the metal at the back end of the tweezer and bending the spread of the jaws. The important thing is that the jaws of the tweezers must be well dressed and aligned. Poorly maintained tips is the main cause of parts pinging away.
    2 points
  16. Unlike some who like to think they are, you truly are ! The 7751 is back together, ticking & showing no less than the 11 functions very happily. Awaiting new crystals to complete the case and for the final walk-through picture ....
    2 points
  17. Hi, My father who spent many years collecting pocket watches and repairing them has recently moved into a Care Home suffering from Alzheimer's Dementia and I have got the unenviable task of clearing out his workroom. My husband and I both have engineering backgrounds, having worked at Rolls-Royce Aerospace, and are familiar with or can work out what some tools do but are less familiar with some of the more specialised watchmaking/repairing tools that my father has. We have already used watchrepair talk.com/forum to gain knowledge on some tools, thank you, and would very much appreciate using the knowledge of the members to identify some of the more obscure tools and their manufacturers, if possible. Hopefully, this is within the remit of the website. Julie
    2 points
  18. Might be cheaper to just change the bracelet. Cousins has some pretty nice ones at very affordable prices.
    2 points
  19. They most certainly did, I have at least 4 wind up pendulum mantle clocks, a couple of floating balance mantle clocks and a wind up balance wheel carriage clock, all marked either "Smiths" or "Smiths Enfield" in my work room right now. According to this site Smiths used Enfield movements from 1932, acquired Enfied in 1933 (slightly at odds with Smiths own web site which states 1934) but didn't use the Smiths Enfield name until 1949. According to the above site Enfiled only started production a year (or two) before Smiths bought them up. I would say that you have a pre 1949 Smiths Enfield.
    2 points
  20. Yeah, I bought another vintage bench today. Drove to Dallas to get it. Will post picture when I get home.
    2 points
  21. Another recent build. Solid aluminum-bronze alloy Seiko style case I got off Ali Express. The movement is a NH35A. I currently have it on a cheap rubber strap but I'm planning to put it on a NATO strap.
    2 points
  22. Welcome to WRT forum. You need a big magnet if you are going to work on them chinese movements, also might consider practicg shock spring removal inside a plastic bag. Good luck
    2 points
  23. Hi all, Just got an old Favre Leuba and the caseback was well and truly stuck. Usually in this situation I would bring it to my mates shop and use his bench opener but as this Favre-Leuba has flats they usually don't work as well. Anyway, another solution is to glue a nut on the caseback and use a wrench on that. Well the superglue is pretty much a necessity for me and there are usually a few tubes in the freezer ...result! After 10minutes for the glue to set, a big adjustable wrench between the lugs and a 14mm spanner in the nut/caseback and it spun right off!. I must say the caseback did a good job keeping the movement clean! This trick has helped me out a few times. If you plan to do this just make sure you keep the superglue away from the caseback/case joint. If any superglue wicks into the joint then things get difficult! Anilv
    2 points
  24. They are surely indian origin. India had a long term vast watch tools industry, long before the chinese tools appeared. Even the Chinese sell some tools that are indian origin. I recognize them as I used to import Indian watchmaker tools for many years (the usable ones ). Frank
    2 points
  25. I have that set, but I now use them for prying/banging and otherwise abusive uses
    2 points
  26. Removing the pendulum is the correct thing to do as this will keep the suspension spring from getting broken or twisting out of shape. If the movement is still ticking then I suggest putting paper or tissue paper between the back plate and the pendulum crutch. What you have described is known as tripping and if left for a long time can cause wear to the escape wheel teeth and the faces of the pallets.
    2 points
  27. Hi, I'm new to all of this and I find it fascinating. I inherited a couple of really old watches and I would love to get an honest opinion of what I have in hand. Here is the first of three that I want to know about. Any help would be appreciated. Anyone know what this is? My Dad passed away and it was in a drawer. So, I cleaned it up and put a battery in it and it works great Many Thanks....
    2 points
  28. Thanks for the tip! "Usually, Epoxy can withstand up to 150° Celsius/300° Fahrenheit for a short period of time. Heat-resistant epoxy can withstand the extreme heat of up to 315° Celsius/600° Fahrenheit depending on the manufacturer and product." - Link I'll consider that method once summer is back. In Sweden our genius politicians have now tried to replace much of our nuclear power with wind power (to save the planet?) but forgot that during the winter (part of Sweden is within the Arctic Circle) there's very little and oftentimes no wind. Consequently the electricity prices are now killing us and the diesel prices are now $8.6 a gallon.
    2 points
  29. I don't drive the screw all the way home, just enough so I can slide the pivot in jewel hole, Its a game of tightening & loosening the screw just to keep gears in place so to slide the pivots in holes, might take a couple of tries, usually one jumps out of its hole whilst you manage to slide another in. I take the cock& balance off the mainplate to gain better access to gears/ pivots. Good luck
    2 points
  30. And yet... Here we are in the junk drawer, taking up server space six pages into a thread that no one will get past the second page of. Had to look that up. Was decommissioned back in 1989, and is currently a natural gas power generation facility. I lived in the northeast corner of Longmont, nearly due west a few miles of that facility for a few years. There's also Rocky Flats, a former nuclear weapons manufacturing location that's now just a grassy field and some foreboding signs. Lots of issues with leaks and spills over the years however long ago turns out. I used to live due west of that as well up in Coal Creek Canyon, and drove by one side or another every time I went anywhere. Fortunately in the instance here (for me and other mountain residents, not all the people in the suburbs down there), prevailing winds along the face of the mountains are almost always easterly, and quite strong. I was a few miles away and a few K' higher. Most interesting thing about my current location is that the nearest "town" is the ghost town where Alferd "The Colorado Cannibal" Packer lived his final days. Also, Colorado's "oldest family nudist resort" is within walking distance. Never been. Heard.... things. Funny full circling, when I first moved to Colorado a decade ago, there was a billboard advertising said nudist resort on my way into Boulder... Right in front of Rocky Flats! Had no idea where it was, and never gave it another thought until we bought our current house and learned that it was up the road.
    2 points
  31. Well, I fashioned a replacement click spring from a ball point pen spring but then got the hardware store to buy a big magnet. Lo and behold, the magnet found the spring!! I am back in business with original parts. Thanks for the advice.
    2 points
  32. Lubrication is a problem in watch repair because watch repair has spanned a very long time. The technical sheets the books the bulletins whatever people look at have spanned a long time. People embrace a certain book author as their God and embrace whatever they said but that might've been written 50 or 100 years ago. The factories keep changing things continuously just because they can I guess. Then there is the missing documentation? Thinking of lubrication follow the link download number 40 and anything else that looks interesting https://www.cousinsuk.com/document/search?SearchString=Working So here's a nice lubrication guide and is at all in the guide no what's missing well number 67 is missing which is amusing document because it doesn't really cover lubricating the mainspring is not lubricated at all. But it's not in the lubrication guide it's in a separate guide titled recycling mainspring barrels. Then what about surface treatment is that necessary? That's also in another separate guide. Sometimes it's in the cleaning guide sometimes it's not. If you're ever at a lecture with her lecturing on lubrication and you corner of the instructor Dell refer you to the tech sheet but once again does the tech sheet cover everything? It's only relatively recent times were the tech sheets start to cover surface treatment. It's why companies like Eta to get away with insanely thin lubrication's for the setting parts where personally I would prefer grease they are using oil but their surface treating. Omega's been surface treating since the 50s and yet it almost never appears in anything. Even companies like Eta now talk about it did they mention that they surface treat their balance staffs? That's in the manufacturing information sheets not the technical guide. Out of curiosity where did you see in this discussion? May be? Minor disclaimer before we go down the rabbit hole? Typically for people new to watch repair there is going to be a problem. Biggest problem is it's the basic things that will trip you up. It's all the things that you don't know and you don't even grasp that you don't know them. It's of things that you can't see it's also where getting a microscope doesn't help. Making something bag if you can't grasp what it is you need to look at what you're trying to see doesn't help at all. So simplistically it's probably something pretty darn simple but if you don't have the expertise to grasp this simple task which you don't because you don't have the experience yet then we can go looking for the obscure things maybe learn something along the way,? The above quote assumes something it assumes that it fits the narrative maybe it doesn't fit the narrative in which case this will not work. We need something we need something from the old days when the manufacturer grasped that the watchmaker had no idea what a timing machine is So they did a decent manual. It's interesting from the manual as this is a transistorized machine and it's the same manual for the vacuum tube machine that they did years later so it's a good manual. http://www.historictimekeepers.com/documents/Micromat.pdf PDF page 15 what is it talking about? Page 16 shows you the wheels gives you time frame your watch won't be exactly the same but it will be close. if you really needed no yes to do the math to figure out what the timeframe is for things. Then continuing on the page 17 the vantage of paper tape you might build a C trends? Now notice I use the word might be able to I've have some experience with this and sometimes it's really hard to see stuff especially when it's back much closer to the mainspring barrel this is where we need something different. I've attached a PDF Page 9 titled 2.2.2 Display Mode Trace. Their demonstration pictures aren't the best but you get us started and I'll see if I can find a better image to make a point.You notice there showing initially a really short time span a lot of variation all watches will have variations like this. Gear train's gears have power fluctuations all gears do the watch will never typically show them including typically on a timing machine as they get averaged out. On the next page you can see the amplitude of the time fluctuation this is what gets averaged out you'll ever see. Notice this is a reasonably high grade watch because the fluctuations are really small if you run one of these on a Rolex watch still be really small or Hamilton 992B has a really tight timing like this other watches they can start to look much worse and yet it's not exactly an issue because it's just the quality of the watch Other things useful in a really expensive timing machine is the oscilloscope mode they show it on page 11 although? The next page where it shows it like the 400 ms setting the timing machine that I use at work as this Senate 400 ms it's better because you can see the spacing between the escapement sounds. This is where if you had a hairspring rubbing issue providing it would actually make a noise of its gently pushing on the balance wheel it doesn't always show up. But just because you see a noise on the oscilloscope doesn't mean it's easy to figure out where that noise is coming from. Then another example of what the time trace future looks like image attached. The amplitude probably isn't right because the lift angle wasn't 52°. But here you can see the effect of the center wheel meshing with the mainspring barrel that's what the longer issue is. The faster one is one of the other wheels. This is a situation where this would average out on a timing machine you would never normally see it. Yes it looks like a USB port what exactly does it do? So I would suggest running on buying the witschi timing machine how much could that possibly cost you? Then some of the software machines they can either make I can the discussion group for others will do similar things. But doesn't get us any closer to finding the problem? In the absence of all of these newfangled fancy things if you look at the that's the original posting person if he looks at your timing machine and the graphical display is too hard to look Look at the numbers are they going up and down? If they are looking to watch and see how fast the going up and down and see if they correspond to an actual repeating pattern. If they're not repeating then what is the problem? I would go back and visually check everything make sure all the pivots are nice and clean and shiny make sure all the holes look like they're nice and clean make sure all the jewels are nice and flat. I don't think I've seen it yet but if you put enough pressure on things you probably not the jewel out of alignment that would give a binding issue. Go back to the mainspring barrel how much side shake you have? I don't remember on this Seiko but did they jewel the main plate for the barrel if not check that the bushings or whatever are still around and you don't have too much side shake. One of the problems that pops up on seven jewel watches is the train will spin nice without the pallet fork again but as soon as the pallet forks in and there's pressure the holes are out around and things will bind up. Everything is jewels in this watch except at the barrel and it's possible you of where they are. On the other hand it could be as simple as a proper cleaning and something resembling reasonably close lubrication. But at least the watches running. Versus buying a broken watch on eBay thinking you're going to fix up the first time and usually people give up and move on because not every watch can be fixed but the Seiko t least it's running and it should do better than what it's doing now. Test and measuring technology mechanical watches.pdf
    2 points
  33. It was not my intention to imply that you were wasting peoples time. I was trying to participate in the diagnosis, nothing more. Mainspring lubrication appears to be one of the complicated and potentially contentious subjects in watchmaking. I have seen recommendations to not open the barrel at all. To put the spring in dry but dab a few dots of oil on top before closing it up. To grease it between fingers. To grease it in the crook of a small fold of watch paper. Pretty sure I've seen Mark grease a spring between fingers and remove the excess from the edges with rodico after winding and after installing in the barrel. I'm sure I've also seen mark install a white alloy mainspring for an automatically wound watch totally dry, but with four or five dabs of grease on the inside walls of the barrel. And this reminds me of the long thread on pallet fork pivots, which we never lubricate, except when we used to and sometimes still do. I recall seeing that two certified watchmakers who both studied at Neuchâtel swore that they received distinctly differing instructions. As for my assignment: It is apparent that the 7S26C is experiencing periodically higher resistance to delivery of power. If we knew some details about the frequency and duration of the period of higher resistance, we could combine this with knowledge of the movement's design to guess where it might be, because we know how many times per hour each wheel turns. This is a shortcoming of the otherwise quite darling LCD timegrapher. Sometimes it is better to have a log over a long duration. Otto Frei offers a printer attachment for their branded version of the Weishi. I wonder if some clever hackers could implement logging through the USB port which is marked "Calibration". I wonder if i can determine how to connect the Weishi microphone to one of the XLR inputs on my audio workstation for this purpose. I wonder if the MEMS type lavalier mic i picked up at a surplus sale is sensitive enough to use with open-source timegrapher software -- really interesting piece of tech, looks like a flat piece of ABS plastic on the end of a wire to me. Under high magnification i have discovered things like partially corroded wheel teeth with little flakes of metal oxides hanging off them at odd angles. This would certainly increase resistance while those teeth are engaged. I've discovered that the bottom pivot of an escape wheel had a subtle Z shape to it. I've found cogs that had some kind of hardened emulsified grease or something embedded in a few of the grooves. Please understand that i am decades into a career in quality assurance. It's not ego, it's habit.
    2 points
  34. One of the issues with the common modern presses is that they do only that - press the crystal. What you often need for acrylic crystals without tension ring is a set which allows you to deform the crystal by using a cup and a corresponding dome to compress the crystal over.
    2 points
  35. Firstly, you have my utmost sympathy. My own grandmother lingered many years with Alzheimer's before passing. It is a difficult thing to bear witness to. But I and the others will help how we may. Post whatever pictures you have of any tools of which you are unsure about usage, and if we know we will tell you and explain them. And that goes for any pocket watches with which you may need help. A few of us, myself included, have more experience with those than with wristwatches and would be happy to help identify if need be,
    2 points
  36. If you enter these words inside double quotes on the search box top right you will have all the relevant discussions to learn at least the basics.
    2 points
  37. There's not too much to fret over if you've done a regular 7750 before. There are two wire click springs on the calendar plate that can jump, and 4 jumpers. Two use springs mounted on the plate, and two the wire springs shared with the moonphase advance lever and corrector. The jumpers for the date and year look identical, and they are, in spite of the manual showing different part numbers, so don't worry about mixing them up. If you've done a 7750 then you are already familiar with the spring for the hour counter hammer and zero lever, that one is always fun to put in place. There is a flat wire spring for the day corrector here, which is easy to overlook or think that it's secured in the plate, but it comes right out. The manual makes it clear how to orient it when reinstalling. The date advance wheel doesn't need to be oriented like the pair of wheels in a regular 7750 day-date, it advances everything in order without any fuss. Pay attention to the minute wheel- it has a little cap on the pinion which needs to go over the hour wheel teeth. This is easy to miss and will lock things up if not installed correctly. Normal 7750 doesn't have this. Otherwise just follow the (very good) manual for lubrication and assembly. They say not to service the barrel but of course you can and should if not replacing it. On a watch this old it might be a good idea to replace it along with the cannon pinion and reverser for the automatic and possibly the rotor bearing. Do the adjustments for the moonphase corrector (again well explained in the manual), the difference between locking up and not working at all is a very small adjustment.
    2 points
  38. The platform escapement must be dismantled to clean and oil it correctly, else you risk leaving old oil and dirt in place and just adding new oil will turn it into grinding paste ruining the pivots. The platform escapement is more like servicing a pocket watch than a regular clock and does require extra care. If its the anchor that has lost a pallet stone rather than a broken balance staff that is better as you can pick up ABEC escapements with broken balance staffs reasonably cheaply that will have a good anchor in them that you can take out to fix yours, but you need to make sure you buy one the same as yours.
    1 point
  39. Its one of the ways out of a hole used it a few times and never failed to get the back off.
    1 point
  40. You can get by for threading a short object by reducing diameter on near a sized one that has the right pitch, but for a complete thread you need to single point thread a complete new one on the lathe. Below a good example, the author then proceeded to make a die from the tap, because he needed to make a new make threading. Also very interesting an insight on how tap are (were ?) made in the industry I will stop with links now because YouTube is better than me at suggesting! These are the Indian ones discussed above. What material and diameter you are trying?
    1 point
  41. First of all my apologies for not having documented the disassembling, but the watch arrived in a terrible condition and I stripped it down right away to get rid of all that dirt. If you have worked on some watches yet and think about entering the chronograph world with a 7734 let me give you 3 advices: Do it! The 7734 is a solid construction and not too complicated. Take your time and watch all the 6 parts of Mark's Venus 175-service on youtube. Of course the Venus is a column wheel system, but the basic movement is very similar and also on the chrono layer you can learn a lot especially about lubrication: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EI3T-IR3AgM Download the 7734 service manual. A lot of information here: https://strela-watch.de/valjoux-7734-7733-7736-technical-documentation/ Here we go. Some 8200 for the barrel and the new mainspring goes in (got it from cousins - what I'm gonna do after Brexit? ). The complete barrel. Some D5 for the arbor. Putting in the wheels and the bridges. Lubrication: 9010 for the escape wheel and the second wheel, D5 for all others. The keyless works. 9501 for the stem and the gears. D5 for the wheels and the lever axis, 9501 for the contact points of levers and springs. The click spring. D5 for the click and the crown wheel, 9501 for the contact point of click and its spring. Finally the ratchet wheel goes in. The pallets go back in, no lubrication for the pivots. Lubricating the balance jewels with 9010. The balance back in. The escape wheel and the pallets got epilame so I let run the movement with dry pallets for some minutes. After that 941 for the pallets (work from the dial side through the window). Now I start with the chronograph. First the bridge and the spring for the levers go in. Fly back lever goes in with some D5. Operating lever, again D5 for the axis. A little bit tricky, you must upline the integrated spring with the upper lever first (9501 for the contact area). The second pictures shows the final layering. The sliding gear goes in, D5 for the lever axis, no lubrication for the wheel! At this point I forgot to put in the minute recorder runner (no lubrication). You should install it here, later its going to be more difficult. The blocking lever (D5) returns. Some 9501 for the contact area to the sliding gear. The blocking lever spring. Be very careful, this one isn't just a flyer, its a damned Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird. The friction spring (gets a drop of 9010). The chronograph runner and its bridge (9010 for the long pivot and the jewel in the bridge). The minute recorder jumper, no lubrication. The hammer. D5 for the axis, 9010 for the lever ends that hit the hearts, 9501 for the contact areas to the sliding gear, fly back lever, operating lever, jumper. The hammer cam jumper. Before installing the clutch give 9010 to the pivots of the coupling wheel. D5 to the lever axis. The spring. 9501 for the contact point. Finally line up the driving wheel with the coupling wheel and the chrono layer is complete again! The dial side. Some 9501 and the cannon pinion goes in. Hour wheel with D5. The dial rest with its 3 screws. The date indicator. The date indicator driving wheel with some D5. The jumper with D5 to its axis. As there was no lubrication described in the manual between disc/jumper or disc/wheel and the parts looked well polished I didn’t lubricate. It works - let’s see how long. The guard with 2 screws. Finally the spring. The dial comes back and is secured with its 2 screws from the side. While disassembling I put the little hands into seperate trays to prevent mixing them up. Now I turned the crown in the setting position exactly to the point when the date switches and put on the hour hand to 12. Positioning the chrono-hand exactly on zero was that tricky that I forgot to take a pic. New springs and gaskets for the pushers. Unfortunatly I’m not good in restoring cases. So just refreshing the brushing a bit and some cape cod work. The movement back in the case and secured with 2 screws. A new gasket for the caseback and here we are. Thank you for watching.
    1 point
  42. Just about a view secounds at 200° My demagnetiser was deliverted today. Of course I used it at once and the amplitude goes a little higher up to ca. 190° (some short time up to 204°) and it stays more stable on all orientations. A little step, but a step at all... Please stay calm. For me all the content here is highly interesting and verry helpful. To this point I 've learned a lot - eaven if there will be no final solution of my problem. For me as a beginner this may no help for my secific problem, but I learn with every thread a little more and it is verry interestimg for me to read, eaven if there are controverse statments.
    1 point
  43. That's an interesting quotation above? Even though you're not versed in the subject of mainsprings or lubrication you're telling me that I wasted everyone's time? Strangely enough I agree with you but not for the same reason. Well I'll still disagree I don't actually know if that lubrication is sticky or not. I do know one modern mainsprings you're not supposed to lubricate at all and it could be a contributing factor to the problems were studying as to whether or not it's the only problem I doubt it. Tell you what I'll give you an assignment to do? As you're showing better insight into the problems of the watch than the original posting person or even maybe everybody else answering questions? Go back to page 1 read the entire discussion and where would you begin? The problem where having is and I might've already said this somewhere above so I'm apologizing for wasting people's time is? Where's the problem seems like a simple question but this is watch repair there is not necessarily simple answers. It's hard to tell in the discussion what's the original problem of a watch? Have there been any problems introduced by the original posting person who has no idea what they're doing. This is why pointed out bad lubrication on the mainspring could be an issue. So we basically have lost our way and as another new person wider to reread the entire discussion and point out where you would luck because I agree the discussion appears to now be a waste of time for one thing were wasting time discussing my lubrication concerns which may or might not be helping the original posting person.
    1 point
  44. Hi attached tech sheet for the PUW 255 hope you find it useful cheers 3610_PUW 255 - 2570NEW.pdf
    1 point
  45. There is no hairspring left for repinning longer, maybe it had broken at the stud and someone "fixed" it that way. I don't know Bulova and I can't tell from pics, are there timing screws?
    1 point
  46. 1 point
  47. I found them in the UK: https://www.zoro.co.uk/shop/materials-and-maintenance/materials/1602 and there are others of course. This is the one with the white tray?
    1 point
  48. The point is that it is not true to say that Timex watches "were never made to be serviced". They were, and Timex published information on precisely how they were made to be serviced, and supplied service parts for that purpose. That is not to say that the Timex service procedures were the only ones that could be applied, and I'll wager that many watchmakers felt, as you do, that the Timex method was in some way inadequate, and therefor a poor substitute for "proper" methods. This would almost certainly lead to a belief that they were not really meant to be serviced at all. However, the "proper" way to service a watch is also the expensive way to service a watch, and that is precisely what Timex was not about. They developed calibres, and processes for servicing those calibres, that were, in their view (as the manufacturer) adequate, and that would keep the cost of servicing down. You can't even argue that Timex were trying to increase the failure rate of their movements and so drum up more sales as people replaced watches that had failed due to inadequate servicing, as cheaper servicing would mean that people would be more inclined to get it done, and faults detected and corrected before they became failures. Also, increased failure in a brand, even when the the manufacturers service procedures had been rigidly adhered to, would lead to poor brand reputation and a reduction in sales. No, the processes recommended by Timex for their calibres were (and still are) adequate for the way that those movements were designed. This is kind of what I was getting at when I referred to watchmakers being reluctant to adopt different processes. The full strip down, clean, inspect, and lubricate service is the only appropriate approach for movements designed with that kind of attention and budget, which covers the vast majority of mechanical watches, and in those instances I wouldn't advocate anything less. However, it's horses for courses, and Timex movements were designed differently with different requirements. Perhaps an analogy would help illustrate here. After just about every race, practice session, set up session, qualifying session, etc, a F1 car engine and transmission is stripped, cleaned inspected, and then put back together again with fresh oil (Swiss approach). My Ford Mondeo gets its oil and filters changed every 10k miles (Timex method). I would be mad to adopt F1 procedures for my Mondi, and an F1 team would last less than 5 seconds if they left the same oil in for 10k miles. Don't get me wrong here, I don't champion Timex watches because they are the best that you can get. But I do think that they do what they were designed to do (cheap time keeping that was also cheap to maintain) extra-ordinarily well. Each to their own though :thumbsu:
    1 point
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