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  1. Finally found a time window to sort out the low amplitude issue on my lovely non-Mumbia Favre Leuba. The only job left to sort was the replacement of the twin mainsprings - pure cowardice. I'm delighted to say it has transformed to amplitude from 215 to 275 degrees so worth doing but not a beginners job. Here's what was learnt from the struggle which should help fellow watch menders. Forget about getting the exact spring from Favre - the new company is another resurrected imitation. According to Dr Ranfft you are looking for 1.55 x 6.5 x 0.065 x 210. Another site suggests a 270 mm length. The old springs were tired but 270 mm long so looking at the fill in the 6.77 mm internal barrel diameter using the longer length looked the way to go. The nearest Cousins UK had in stock was GR4052 which is 7.5 mm diameter so they will need to be unwound and rewound into a 6.5 mm winder barrel. At over £20 each inc VaT this was expensive - Gleaves & Sons had 1.5 x 0.7 x 285 x 7 mm dia for £6 each so they got the order. It still meant rewinding so make sure you have the small winding tools this requires. The barrel design is probably unique. To save height there is no barrel top - instead the winding wheel sits on top of the open barrel and covers the spring. It has a hollow stem which forms the arbor and has the spring hook on this sleeve. The barrel has a hollow stem and one fits over the other - very neat. It's a pig to get apart. Use your sprung hand puller hooked under the geared cover as shown in the pictures. Next problem is that the new spring will have the inner circle in too large a diameter so that the arbor hook will not engage with the attachment slot. I tried a few tricks but the one that worked was to go ahead and install the spring in the open barrel. Then using flat ended strong tweezers squeeze the spring end to tighten that last curve until the wheel/arbor grabs. Patience and trial and error will be required.... It can be done before inserting the spring but make sure you put a drill through the middle to squeeze against thus preventing the brittle metal from snapping. 1.2 mm proved to be the best size. However I would suggest you do it after the spring is in the barrel since it makes it easier to thread in your winding tools. The hollow spigot in the barrel works as a handy former to shape the spring against. Don't forget to put a drop of HP 1300 or something similar on the outside and inside of the barrel spigot. Note that the spring should be CLOCKWISE in the barrel - ie starting from the centre it curves clockwise. Helpfully the neat design means that both barrels run the same way so are identical. Also admire the large ruby bush pivots on the barrel bridge - a feature that very few factory produced watches offered in this era - and still don't. Also look how well the balance is supported. Be careful when screwing down the bridge - the small winding wheel has to be guided into the barrel cover gear. This is a delightful slim movement and a great shame that so many ended up in tropical climates. She now runs like a champ 275 degrees amplitude DU and a two position delta of 6 seconds.
    6 points
  2. I think I’m about done. In the end, I removed two regular balance screws and added two much smaller screws that I found in my “Junque”. Mean time screws remain on the balance. Dial down is 0 s/d and dial up is +7 s/d. The amplitude is impressive for an old pocket watch. Side positions are similar, with amplitude staying above 260. I would like to get the beat error down to <0.5 but think I’ll leave it it for now. Thank you all, again!
    5 points
  3. Hi I have seen his site, pretty useful there is also welwynwatchparts.co.uk who are of the same ilk selling second user parts, worth a look for the future.
    4 points
  4. I'm in Australia, so parts/movements are fairly difficult to come by or just too pricey in general. I found this company in The Netherlands called speedtimerkollektion that sell job lots of parts, movements, cases etc for all kinds of watches. I managed to get 4x defective 7009a's plus shipping for $38 AUS. That's about the same price as one of the cheapest Mumbai specials on eBay. Time will tell if it was a worthwhile purchase or not, but I figure at least I'll have enough spares to get one working movement out of the lot.
    4 points
  5. I picked up a bunch of ex retail display stands from ebay. I snagged 30 of them for six quid, which I thought was a suitable price for displaying a bunch of 404 club watches. They are a little scruffy in the sense that some of them still have sticky residue from the old price stickers, and some even had the original stickers still attached, so I thought why waste those. Here are eight mechanicals and one bizarracle, from the 404 club, for your amusement. I'll clean up the rest of the sticky mess from these and probably leave them blank, although I might print a small detail card for each one I display. Oh.. and for those of you who were wondering if I was managing to keep the new watch bench immaculately clean... well mostly, but there is a fair bit of clutter on it at the moment.
    4 points
  6. I wanted to post an update on how my project was "progressing" As @grsnoviand @JohnR725already remarked, swapping parts of old movements may cause problems. Even though the donor movement has the same diameter, has the same look, has the same number and has been made by the same manufacture; just about NOTHING did fit. Earlier I tried to swap just the balance assembly of the donor but GGF's watch wasn't happy. I tried the combination of donor escape-wheel / pallet fork / balance assembly, but the escape-wheel prevented the wheel-train from running smoothly. So I tried just the pallet-fork / balance assembly ... that didn't work either. Back to the idea of swapping the whole donor movement in GGF's case. GGF's dial fitted, but GGF's hour-hand was too big for the donors hour-wheel. So I changed the donor hour-wheel for GGF's. GGF's minute hand did kinda fit, but GGF's little seconds hand just dropped over the donors seconds-pivot, so I had to use the too long donors seconds-hand Attempting to get this already Franken in GGF's case didn't work very well either. I probably could make it to fit, but that meant modification to GGF's case and that was for me a step too far. I reversed to whole process, all the parts belonging to the donor back to the donor and what belonged to GGF's back to GGF's watch. To avoid any mix-up, the donor movement is back in its own case, with its own dial & hands, ticking happily away. It seems that there is only one way forwards, and that's restoring / repairing the original GGF's-parts, in this case mainly the balance assembly; restoring the hairspring / replacing the missing timing-screws / getting the balance in time and do the poising. Delicate work which, apart from manipulating hairsprings, I haven't done before. It seems to me a bit of a "Do or die" scenario, with no room for error Lots of work done with no real results, but valuable lessons learned
    4 points
  7. No that's definitely a bad attitude. Especially with American pocket watches the banking pins are movable and you should definitely move them leave them in some random place because you can what would be the consequences? Just to be technically correct that's not exactly a wostep handout. If you look carefully at the title which I think I changed after I downloaded it it's a combination of wostep and North Seattle community college As that's Where I down off their website. Which is why it's kind of a mixed up mess of things. But still it's good even if it is kind of a mess Then there's the problem with escapement terminology and time and wherever you're located or and a combination of all of us. If you look at various handouts on the escapement and I'll add in a couple more for you they have differing terminologies and they'll get obsessed with certain terminologies and stuff. The terminology becomes kinda Of amusing like so many things in watch repair there can be actually multiple names for the same part just depending upon where and when. But as you like handouts let's attach a few more. I usually think of the banking pins is there for Horn clearance only. But other people think of them as solutions to potential problems that they perceive they have or have not. Which is why typically on American pocket watches with movable banking pins they been moved. Then related to these so-called wostep handout is this lecture. Yes a perfect example of what happens when you film a lecture given at AWCI convention the audio sucks. But it's an extremely good lecture he's a very good teacher is well worth your time and effort to try to make it through it. Elgin watch company Escapement Terminology.PDF Escapement Detached Lever Escapement.PDF Escapement Elgin setting up the escapement.PDF
    3 points
  8. Progress. I disassembled the motor, cleaned it, oiled the bearings, and re-wired it. The housing for one of the brushes was busted, so I 3D printed a threaded cover and a screw that functions very nearly like the original. I tested the motor and it works. Now to rebuild the rest of the machine.
    3 points
  9. I happened across this video earlier and not having previously encountered Philomena Cunk, didn't quite know what to expect. You Brits might have a better idea going in than I did. Philomena Cunk's Moments of Wonder Ep 1: Time
    3 points
  10. I'm in two minds. If it increases the resale value, or you want it to be your watch, then it might be a good if not expensive thing to persue. But then again, perhaps in 10-15 years Scotland Yard might announce that they've finally uncovered the identity of the infamous East Scunthorpe Sewerage Strangler, and suddenly your old retirement watch is worth a mint to some weirdo.
    3 points
  11. Well I guess if quartz isn't your thing, then maybe a little bit of a Timex treat will brighten up your day. A 1977 Timex Marlin (26160 02477) joins the club following a couple of hydrocarbon baths and a lot of scrubbing and polishing. I also recently picked up a job lot of of NOS 1970s watch bands. Some were perhaps beyond saving, but there were a couple of denim straps that really ooze that 1970 vibe, so what better paring can you think of.
    3 points
  12. Hello HectorLooi, Im glad you posted this recommendation, and I followed up by opening the case back on both watches. The watch with number 3D0440 had a Seiko battery in it and it was the SR621SW. I opened the other watch which had case number 270330 and I was surprised that the battery installed was a Renata 377. So I ordered the Energizer 364/363 on Amazon and the package came about an hour and a half ago. After eating supper I replaced both batteries and both watches are working again! The diameter of the SR621SW, the Enegizer 364/363 and the Renata 377 are all the same, but the thicknesses vary. The SR621SW and the Energizer 364/363 show thickness of 2.15 mm, but the Renata 377 2.6 mm. I'm not sure if that varies but I'm glad to get a close replacement for the SR621SW that has the same thickness. All three batteries spec sheets show 1.55 for Voltage. I've now repaired a total of 7 watchs (all electronic) since joining Watch Repair talk. Two may be beyond repair. I took my Dad's WW2 Jaeger-LeCoultre E159 P478 Military Circa 1945 watch to an authorized seller and repair place near my house. It's now in Switzerland being repaired. It think that would have been "A Bridge Too Far" given my lack of knowledge, but these forums a great with helpful people. I have a third watch that's my wife's (a Seiko 1NO1-0CS0, case # 471682) to do and the battery will arrive Wednesday. Thanks HectorLooi!
    3 points
  13. put the balance wheel in the watch without the hairspring. Rotate the balance wheel until the watches in beat. then from the center of the balance jewel assembly visualize a line going through the stud holder continuing until the rim of the balance wheel and put a Mark there. a felt pen works really well as it's not permanent.
    3 points
  14. Looks like Cousins has it. https://www.cousinsuk.com/sku/details/eta-parts-search/eta926301404l1230
    3 points
  15. Way too early to celebrate, but after working my *ss off today, GGF's movement is kinda ticking again. Replaced the two missing timing screws and brought the balance "in-time" again. Poised the balance wheel and now I've a reasonable a Dial UP and Dial Down again. Vertical positions are no good yet, but I suspect still more work has to be done on the Breguet hairspring and the messed up regulator. Amplitude could be somewhat higher too, but we may have a starting point .......
    3 points
  16. Those special pinvices are rather costly and rare, and different sizes will be needed. You could make (I did once) your own one with low cost. Take a cheap indian sliding pinvice (#330, its opening is zero) and a jewellers burr with ball shaped tip of appropriate diameter. Then mill the center of the pinvice to the needed depth. The mouth of the pinvice is mild steel. It will last and keep its shape for very long. Frank
    3 points
  17. Hi all , how good is this ,absolutely useless. Push switch and the lid opens and a lever pops out and closes it . Useless
    2 points
  18. Here's a copy of a Wostep handout regarding the escapement. It doesn't use the exact same terminology as @nickelsilver's steps, but I believe it covers the same territory. Escapement handout wostep nscc.pdf
    2 points
  19. I was cleaning a watch today. Had already done the clean stage and had started the rinse...bam! The motor quit. So, for the next two hours, I was refurbishing this motor. It had been hacked by earlier watchmakers...found a lousy solder joint that finally said "No more." I took the opportunity to do a thorough cleaning and rewiring. Working now. I have another L&R that has a motor problem...similar motor...so this was a good trial run to fixing it.
    2 points
  20. Will do. Hes out of little offenders for auto theft today , he likes some tunes on so if you can leave your keys in the ignition for him that would be great. He said it depends on the market price of your car.
    2 points
  21. Can you check freddy's availability for next week, my car is filthy
    2 points
  22. These don't need any commentary from me. Enjoy. More examples here. https://www.youtube.com/@Waterpearl_escapement
    2 points
  23. Yeah, people begged to not jump into the deep end with 7s26 as my first watch but i'm glad i did even though it was torture at times. ANd this is smooth sailing for sure. Not sure if you saw but this is actually my second 7s26. I just finished my first ever repair and service the other day and it came out amazing! Here's teh before and after pic. ANd that's rough about your project watch. I got a BEAUTIFUL vintage seiko 7006 just in gorgeous condition, i haven't opened it up yet but it doesn't run and i'm praying the inside doesn't show any surprises. I did pick up a donor movement in advance that barely runs but that will be my first true project watch.
    2 points
  24. Its a Timex. Apparently the prescribed method of cleaning them is to drop them into some lighter fluid. I kid you not. Furthermore it works. Slightly alarmingly the mechanism actually keeps on ticking even when its in the lighter fluid. I'm sure all of this would give the modern health and safety gnomes a fit of the vapours. This one needed a couple of prolonged dunks, to remove all of the dried up oil and bring it back to life, followed by some fresh lubrication. This particular model is actually a front loader, so removing and refitting the crystal is the only way to get the mechanism out. Both processes are somewhat stressful as the scope for damaging things is pretty high, however it survived and is now ticking away nicely. I'll revisit it some time tomorrow to regulate it once all of those replacement hydrocarbons have settled down.
    2 points
  25. 2 points
  26. It sounds like the cannon pinion is too tight. Without the pallet in, the crown will back-drive the gear train.
    2 points
  27. I bought an old mantel clock as a practice piece. It might be based on a Smiths car clock movement, I'm not sure. These have the feature of having relatively soft plated pivots so there was plenty to get on with. It is scratched and rusty in parts so I'm not worried about experimenting on it. One notable issue was the escapement which did not drop to lock on the exit pallet. Whilst there is wear to the escapement wheel tips the entry pallet did lock so there was some uneveness there between entry and exit that might not entirely be due to wear of the tips of the teeth. The escapement safety functions and pivots are OK. I showed the movement to some friends at a local horological society and was advised that it looks like the pallets might have been moved. Given that is is a non functioning clock and I have another scrap ABEC platform to play with I thought I'd have a play I made a little brass heatsink, and measured the pallet from the back of the fork I I started gently heating the warmer until I could feel the shellac was soft, using a mini bunsen on yellow flame. I did put a fibreglass mat on the bench first for heat protection! First attempt and the pallet was not quite straight. I was aiming to increase the depth by 0.10 mm. I managed 0.08mm And gave it a try. Still not quite locking, but an improvement from fully impacting the impulse face to just meeting the end of it. I repeated the process and pulled it out another 0.05mm Now it drops to lock at a depth similar to the entry pallet. I set the banking pins to give approximately equal total lock. A quick clean and I popped it back in. The movement runs even at a low wind :Smiths car clock movt Having succeeded in my initial objective- to learn a new technique - I'm doubtful whether it was the correct solution. I suspect that I'm compensating for wear to the escapement wheel. That said, it was an interesting experiment and as it turned out, quite straightforward. Next stop, check it's in beat. It sounds OK and self starts so no a bad start.
    2 points
  28. My money would be on a snap on back dressed up to look like a screw on back for marketing purposes. The facets on the back have a distinct slope to them which would make it difficult to use a wrench without it slipping. Also the gap you have indicated with an arrow looks like a pry point. If it is a screw on back, and you can turn it without either tightening or loosening it then the threads must be stripped.
    2 points
  29. Oh no! That's not good! I actually found a site that sells job lots of various calibers for parts/repair at (what I consider) a decent price. I've bought 4 more 7009a's, just waiting for them to be delivered. I figured I'm going to lose parts so having spares will be good. I've managed to slowly get everything I need in regards to the oils. 9010, D5, 9415, Molykote DX, 8200 and 8217. That should cover my bases for everything. Also a silicone sponge greaser. It took a long time to get everything and cost a lot of money, but I've discovered time and money is the name of the game for this hobby. I was digging through my desk drawer the other day and actually found the bottom half of the barrel! It had flung in there and disappeared towards the back. So I've managed to recover all the missing parts now. I've managed to work out a process for manually reinstalling the mainspring and arbor, but I've ordered some really cheap winders from Ali express that will be delivered in the new year. I'm going to try and give this crappy old movement a proper clean and see if I can get it back together though, just for practise.
    2 points
  30. Ok, this watch is getting set to the side for a while. I went through the process of setting the banking pins, "banked to the drop", then opening them up to allow further slide. Ran for a bit, then the escapement jammed again. Took a look, and the roller jewel is coming loose, and it's sitting at an angle and moving around! Enough already I don't have a tool for setting the roller jewel, not something I've needed to do before. So, I got on the bay and found a combination tool at a decent price. I have shellac, just no tool to hold the roller. When it shows up, I'll continue on with this repair. There are other things going on, too, but one step at a time, maybe I'll get this thing to run. Onwards!
    2 points
  31. Okay. I ended up (for now) removing mean time screws, the ones not near the arms. That did it for rate. It is currently +20 s/d dial down and -20 s/d dial up. I will likely end up looking for some smaller gold balance screws to use so I can leave all four mean time screws on the balance. I could reduce weight by filing some of the bigger screws but really don’t want to since they are gold. Thank you for everyone’s help! I may have eventually stumbled upon the cause but would it would have taken substantially longer. This is an excellent example of the importance of stopping when baffled and seeking advice on this forum…what a great gift to both get help and provide it.
    2 points
  32. So you're from Switzerland where you currently located? You're probably aware that when you start off in any field like the engineering field you don't just start at the top you start at the bottom and get the basic theories down as you work your way up. So for instance an automatic watch is the manual watch with an automatic attached to it. Sometimes its integrated in all is one thing but a lot of times it's a separate attachment. So everything in Mark's course on mechanical watches still applies to the automatic watch. It just that you have to start somewhere and it's easier to start with the basic mechanical watch not having all the complications of the automatic watch.
    2 points
  33. If you've never actually taken a watch apart and put it back together I would suggest purchasing a clone of a 6497 off of eBay. In other words a brand-new running watch. Then it be nice if you in a timing machine either the Chinese 1000 or 1900 works. Although the 1900 is slightly nicer. Or you could service your Rolex. The reason I always recommend purchasing a brand-new watch is for learning purposes. So in other words you are brand-new watch you wind it up you put on the timing machine you see how it's doing. Taken apart put it back together you put it back on the timing machine and who to blame? Wife kids the dog the Hootie want to blame if it's not running? Yes watch repair it looks simple but it isn't always simple depends on the individual. If you start by servicing an existing watch in unknown condition you may or may not grasp as to whether your hand eye coordination is quite as good as you think it is and maybe the reason is not running is your fault. So it helps to practice on something disposable first and work on your hand eye coordination before servicing watches. But we have had people start with a Rolex watch. I assume your Rolex watches currently running so in other words was not running afterwords and a lot of times people do better with expensive lessons like a balance complete. Otherwise I get a clone of a brand-new watch the 6497 you go to eBay their lesson $50.
    2 points
  34. I purchased a Novoflex Castel-L from B&H Photo here in the States. Very smooth adjustment. So far I'm happy with it. It has been criticized for the way it holds the camera as well as the amount of travel per 360° turn of the adjustment knob but as I said, it's working fine for me on 1:1 macro shots.
    2 points
  35. EB 8800s seem to be one of the more frequently recurring characters in this game.
    2 points
  36. I had a chance to take this apart and clean it yesterday. The movement was spotless and went back together very easily. I enjoyed working on this EB 8800; after doing a pile of Timex pin pallet movements I didn't expect this to be so pleasant to assemble. It's even simple to get it into beat. So I feel like I got my one dollar's worth on this piece.
    2 points
  37. That is the reason of your trace and missing beat rate detection. You cannot tell from the traces if the watch is way too fast or too slow. You may try what John suggested (set 18000 manually, but it will not make much difference, I suppose) or test the rate "by foot" with a stopwatch and counting swings. Then you will get the rate error but not yet its reason. Frank
    2 points
  38. Hmmm, I forgot about this thread. I've been wearing this one for the last week after I got it freshened up again. And this is what I started with. Very nice result with the focus stacking! I've been meaning to mess with it a bit for macro shots. What focus rail are you using?
    2 points
  39. The result of all that hard work is, you now have a clear idea of the way forward. No more ifs and buts. Take your time, no deadlines. With your patience and attention to detail, you have a good chance of success.
    2 points
  40. My guess, the timing is off by more than 999 s/day.
    2 points
  41. When I see traces like that is when pivots are broken or when HS coils are touching or bunched up. I would focus around the balance area and spend some time making sure everything is perfect. If an end cap is cracked, I’m inclined to think the pivot that goes with it is compromised.
    2 points
  42. Quite a number of makers stamped a Federal/Swiss cross on the movement. There are also a number of makers who used that cross as part of their makers mark, so as others have said, and as I suspect, the keyless work is more likely to yield a clue as to the maker. .. for example .. You may find makers marks on the hidden side of the bridges or under the balance. There is no consistent place to look unfortunately, and some movements, particularly older ones, are really difficult to place. Brevet incidentally means "Patent" so far as I am aware, and is not a particular manufacturer. For example this piece that google provided when I searched for Brevet watch
    2 points
  43. New macro focus rail. 18 images focus-merged. Didn't think about the fact that the second sweep and minute hand would move during the 18 separate exposures (so a quick edit to replace the whole second hand dial).
    2 points
  44. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ship_of_Theseus I have faced this dilemma and it is tough. GGF rarely saw the movement, but always saw the case, dial, and hands. I think I would swap the movement and continue to work on the original.
    2 points
  45. get two screw drivers (flat blade ) I use two car mechanic ones, place them either side of the arbor and twist them, dont try to pry them upwards youll only bend the arbor.
    2 points
  46. Just between the two of us, so do I, specially Seiko 5's
    1 point
  47. I’ll take it apart later and take a better look at the impulse jewel length. I didn’t use IPA or anything that dissolves shellac. The balance end-shake looks and feels good. Really strange amplitude is good, at least dial down, but trace is sooooo whacky.
    1 point
  48. what a lot of youtubers experience and what they choose to show us are often two different things. I used to watch an American hobbiest, when he finished a reassembly and placed the watch on his tg the result was almost always no or very little beat error and within a couple of seconds of time keeping, i might add with no regulation whatsoever on old vintage watches. "hey look at me i can strip down a watch fix it, oil it and reassemble it in a couple of hours and it runs perfectly every time woohoo '. Yeah right of course you can, can we now see the actual full footage with all the fluff ups Billy no mates. We cant believe all that we see and hear, in fact very little when it comes to being popular and money is involved. Mike at retro watches can be a complete numpty sometimes but at least he doesn't hide it.
    1 point
  49. Another machine modded to do the Master-matic forward/reverse! Huge thanks to Jimzzila!!
    1 point
  50. Welcome. It is a lot of fun. It will drive you batty. It will empty your bank account...but it is a lot of fun...did I say that already??? This forum is the best place to come for answers.
    1 point
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