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  1. Here is my setup with copious magnification! I am now at the point of being dangerous. Quality tools in the hands of an amateur. When I was a kid, I would often play with this lathe, but never developed any skill...just had fun turning brass rods.
    5 points
  2. Most watchmaker lathes have plain bearings. The majority are hard steel spindle on hard steel stationary bearings, some have bronze bearings and some cast iron. Almost all are adjustable for wear (the only one I know of with no provision for radial wear is the Steiner design). All of these are what is known as "constant loss" lubrication. That means you put oil in the bearing, and it works its way out during use- either from gravity, or being slung onto your shirt. The downside it you have to check and top up the oil frequently. The upside is they are very tolerant of lubrication differences.
    5 points
  3. It has been a bit of saga but worth it. Finally cut a screw for the 8 days French alarm clock. One of the four to fasten the pillars to the base, three were missing. I am almost sure that all its sizes are in French lignes, to begin with the pitch of 4 threads per ligne (0.564mm). The head is 2 x 1 exactly. The pitch is easy to get if your lathe has a bunch of gears. But the profile is another story, antique threads have rounded crests and valleys. I can only hypotize on how that could be reproduced in an home shop - not easily. Anyway, just like my Swiss-exiled counselor has confir
    4 points
  4. I figured I'd post the watch that started me on this journey. It really is quite gorgeous. I saved the photos from the original ebay listing. The listing said, "ART DECO 1930s BULOVA ENGRAVED CASE WATCH NEAR MINT" I've since learned that the watch is not from the 1930's but is a 1928 Surrey. Also, not mentioned in the listing is that it was recased in an Illinois Watch Co. case. I actually like this case much more than the original Surrey case so I can't really complain about that. The only real issue is that the movement just kind floats in the case since the movement isn't actually atta
    4 points
  5. With a set blued steel mainspring that's in desperate need of being replaced you can still verify that a watch is functional and you would have more than 160° of amplitude. At least for a little while it's not going to have the running time of a mainspring that's in proper condition. You repeating pattern could be magnetism or something in the gear train. I'm attaching an image it will differ depending upon the gear ratios of the particular watch but ill give you an idea. Then the picture came out of a manual for timing machine. Even though it's an older machine 90% of the manual is st
    4 points
  6. You can't get into dissecting anything on the graph until the amplitude is up, you'll want at least 250 degrees, better 270-280. What could be causing the low amplitude is a laundry list of things. -was the train free, did it move freely with just 1 or 2 clicks of wind and did the escape wheel reverse when it came to a stop? -endshakes all good? -mainspring and barrel in good condition? -pallet fork snaps cleanly to its bankings with just a few clicks of wind? -balance pivots in good shape, all jewels in good shape, hairspring in good shape? -did you peg jewels,
    4 points
  7. The difference between 19800 and 18000 is 1800 beats per hour. That is the difference of 360 seconds or -6 minutes an hour (based on a 18000bph standard) or about -5 minutes 25-30 seconds (based on a 19800bph standard). So you theory that the wrong balance complete was used is very likely. I suspect if a 19800 balance complete was installed you issue would resolve. Let us know how it goes.
    4 points
  8. 3 points
  9. I think Michael1962 is on the money and as Old Hippy says you wont be there anyway, What could she do, Bury you , burn you put you out for compost. You are safe from an ear bashing, on the other hand she might be rubbing her hands over your shrewd investment and thinking what she can invest the cash in, like a nice holiday a new wardrobe of clothes, Hmm make sure she goes first.
    3 points
  10. This may help you after you have assembled the movement
    3 points
  11. A rather scruffy Casio CS-831 is on its way. Released in 1983 with a stainless steel case, and Casio build quality, these were arguably the must have calculator watch of the day, and one of those gadgets that I nearly bought, back then but couldn't justify the price for at the time. Well there is no problem with the price of this one, it easily will make it in to the 404 club, assuming I can get it working and make it look a little more presentable. I'm not sure the bracelet is original, but I have a couple of suitable Casio bracelets in the junk pile if it isn't.
    3 points
  12. Agreed, the first step is understanding the low amplitude, which is a kind of global health marker. In the spirit of starting at the mainspring, was it replaced? Does it have a white alloy mainspring? A common cause of poor amplitude is when the mainspring barrel binds against the arbor. It's a good idea to insert the arbor into the empty barrel, close it up, and check out the clearances. The empty barrel should spin smoothly around the arbor.
    3 points
  13. There were numerous funny little lathe-type tools made for refinishing pivots over the years, usually with one pivot supported in a cone center and the pivot to be polished sticking through a hole in a thin support. The part (they were mostly intended for balances) would be spun by a bow or other means, and you'd go at the pivot with whatever you like to use. Wood with abrasive, stones, whatever. But there is no support for the little pivot, and using abrasives on pivots could possibly lead to some imbedding in the steel and eventually wearing the jewels, and other stuff that in my mind makes
    3 points
  14. Lemania chrono? first attempt to service.? You are a brave man. Welcome to the forum. Regs Joe
    3 points
  15. There is always the tiny possibility that we can get a replacement and deny you your fun of making one. Then it's a shame it wasn't the right kind of stopwatch? Some stopwatch is have spare parts. Their hiding so I went online and snipped out some pictures for you. This particular example actually has a note that the parts are hiding under something. Other times it's not at least I remember it's not always shown that this is where the parts are hiding.
    2 points
  16. Hello I am in the Baltimore Maryland area and somehow I accidentally ordered some duplicate oils and greases... well not somehow I forgot I ordered them and order them again. Unfortunately I can’t return these because that’s the policy and i’d rather give them to someone who can use them anyway. I have 9501, 9415, and KT 22 spares. If someone’s in the area we could meet and you can have them, I would prefer to not have to mess around with shipping them. I’m hoping to give them to someone who starting up and can’t afford them but if you’re in the area and you can use them let me know.
    2 points
  17. Years ago when I was married my wife asked me did I want to be buried or cremated. I told her I wanted to be stuffed and sat on my favourite bar stool in the corner of my favourite pub at the bar. That was in the days when I could drink a hell of a lot. These days I'd sooner have a cup of tea.
    2 points
  18. Or you could say, "Look Dear! The prices of watches have really gone up since Covid. My watches are now worth a whole lot more now. What a clever boy I am. "
    2 points
  19. I'm afraid one day I will die and my wife will sell my watches and tools for what I told her I paid for them.
    2 points
  20. I had no idea anyone had produced "friction jewel converters" ! Haha. I have made them many times though. It's a quick lathe job, and when done neatly you have to take the bridge off and look underneath to see that there isn't an original rub in jewel in a rub in setting. Having nickel bar is handy at it blends very well in german silver movements, for a high end gold plated movement with a visible setting the converter gets plated.
    2 points
  21. From a restoration perspective, the proper approach is to "rub in" another jewel. You can open up the thin lip that secures the old jewel (with a lathe or with some jewel opening/closing tools), put a new jewel in, and then close up the lip again. Those tools pop up on eBay on occasion and sell for a lot. It is not as hard or daunting as it sounds. Fried's books (either Watch Repairer's Manual, Bench Practices..., or both) give a good tutorial and breakdown. But from a practical perspective, do a search for "friction jewel converters." I have an example of using them here on a old 7
    2 points
  22. That's gold. Just what i was looking for. Thank you both so much.
    2 points
  23. Hi there, hope this helps its from ESEMBL-O-GRAF for cal 51, as nickelsilver says they are the same, pretty much.
    2 points
  24. It's in the Esembl-o-Graf books, at least the 51 is, and all the Landerons are pretty much the same. I used to have a link to all the books online but they've become hard to find, here's a link for the 51. http://www.clubderelojeria.com/archivos/01LANDERON51.pdf
    2 points
  25. I don't have that trouble I'm retired and divorced.
    2 points
  26. Before you go out and buy a dental drill.... I tested the smallest drill I had, a children's handpiece. The angle is probably worse than using a long bit from the side of the opposite lug.
    2 points
  27. Welcome to the forum JR, My eyesight is the similar although I can see well enough without them. I have been wearing Varifocals for years and use a headband binocular set which allows me to wear the glasses and the head band, Ok for normal work but for close up its glasses off and a loupe. The joys of old age among others.
    2 points
  28. Well, this was some potentially very, very good news I have no idea what brand my Jacot tool is. However, the fork in the picture on the page you linked to looks exactly like the one on my tool. Getting my tools out for some measuring, keeping my fingers crossed, hard! (I'll be back...). BTW, @nickelsilver I truly appreciate you sharing your knowledge, experience and support! IMO, WRT should award you Most Valuable Professional-WRT:er
    2 points
  29. That all sounds pretty spot on. The Bergeon burnisher works much better haha. Especially for conical pivots, I think you'll find the Vallorbe is only good for large pocket watches (the radius is too large). Strokes at maybe 2 back and forths per second. Force, that's hard to explain, but probably more than you think. Like a pound? Half a kilo? Half that for small pivots. Very fine oil. Traditional here is pure lavender or almond oil, but 9020 or 9010 is ok (but expensive). For some reason the natural oils seem to work better. The rest is just practice! Also- there's no
    2 points
  30. I suspect in real life you could use almost any oil including automotive oil to lubricate your way and you probably be okay. Yes there's better stuff to use but our applications aren't really that critical. For instance the first link. This roll down far enough somebody tells a story of basically someone in production during the war couldn't get the proper oil used SAE 30 automotive oil And after running it for quite some time to take it apart there is no problem at all. https://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/south-bend-lathes/spindle-oil-320198/ Farther down the discussion is a refer
    2 points
  31. I think you would have to weigh the risks vs benefits involved. And I don't think much can be done about the bled out spots on the chapter ring even if you manage to get the glass off. I would just leave it alone.
    2 points
  32. Hi Hector Both holes look original and dont appear to have been bushed. The method in doing these is the same as any re bushing job, making sure you broach or drill the hole central. the attaced noted will explain the procedure. I use a small drill in the drill press drilled under size (bush Size) and breach to fit thn broach the pivot hole. when done try the wheel and the adjacent one for smooth running. 1002416176_BushingUsingHandTools.pdf (2).pdf
    2 points
  33. Hi there WellAdjusted .Well at my workplace we are not allowed to wear wristwatches and so what I did was pick a good clean tractor (pin pallet pocket watch ) out of my collection .All i have done is I removed the movement from the case then I removed the dial and hands .Then I ran it through the ultrasonic in lighter fluid ,then in a rinse ,dried it out . Now the next bit happened out of laziness and I thought this would be a good experiment .I was getting prepared to oil the watch after checking the condition of the pivots ,end shake and so on .The movement is in very good shape .I looked ac
    2 points
  34. Sometimes the obvious answer to a problem is just too... well, obvious. The pinion isn't attached to the arbor, it's attached to the barrel, which of course, makes perfect sense.
    2 points
  35. Hi again @aoleite Whilst there is a general standardisation that manufacturer and a model indication appears under the balance, the latter aspect varies depending on the whim of the manufacturer. Here is the ID from a 1902: As you can see it has the same 1902/03 you see. My guess in your case is that the addition of a day came sometime down the road and with a large stock of existing general 1902/03 plates AS just added a 1906 stamp underneath to indicate the specific model. That is your model i.e. you specifically have a 1906 but this is based on the 1902 (as is the 1903).
    2 points
  36. Perhaps an Ebosa, can even be a baumgartner or langendorf. Find us a trademark engraved on it some place, ebosa's mark is real small.
    1 point
  37. AS/ETA/ESA 536.121 are the same. Schematic diagram may exist, otherwise, you should take picture as you disassemble to the keyless, show us a picture of it please. Regs Joe
    1 point
  38. No teeth on drive, or headstock. Just friction. As I recall...my dad had a leather belt installed back in the day. Not sure what caused the transition. It is a very nice belt and will never break--pretty sure of that. It is quiet.
    1 point
  39. Doesn't this just verify that I was correct? We're not trying to pick up audio so in which case we do not need a microphone. Then you might find the link below interesting https://www.shure.com/en-US/performance-production/louder/the-history-of-crystal-microphones-and-artifacts-from-the-shure-archives
    1 point
  40. They have a better grip.
    1 point
  41. They all moved freely - although I didn't check with just one or two clicks of wind They seemed ok, but I will re-check The mainspring and barrel are the two things I did not open - although you indicate that the amplitude probably hasn't got much to do with this? Again, I didn't check with one or two clicks but it seemed ok - another thing to go back and check Yes, they are fine - removed shock springs and cleaned the endstones and oiled (9010) I dd peg them but probably not very well. Need to do them again. They weren't oiled afterward Probabl
    1 point
  42. Saw this clock at Gator Park in the Everglades FL last week. It was 1:55 when I took this picture. It was interesting that the kids were the ones who were able to read it.
    1 point
  43. Here's a little story that should put a smile on your dial https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-01-01/horology-reuben-schoots-handmaking-mechanical-watch/12992718
    1 point
  44. Not to split hairs but I don't think there is any advantage in using engine oil on machinery. No damage will occur but is not made for that. Without going to lengths, engine oil must work and maintain its properties under high temperatures, pressures, and exposition to contaminants, plus it must deliver a bunch of other features. Nothing or very little of that exists in a machine tool. And if it's of synthetic formulation its characteristics (mainly, extended service life) do not have a chance of being triggered. So you will find that machine oil, from a sewing machine to a plain b
    1 point
  45. Good job @luiazazrambo you have done your homework. I see that you have thoroughly read the blog. I will try to explain as best I can. The bimorph sensor is a piezo electric and is not sensitive to humidity, not to the degree of the old salt-based crystals used by the timegraphers of the 40s 50s 60s 70s. But from my experience, they are not that sensitive. The glue: It can be a good quality epoxy resin. The idea is that it solidifies very well, as it is the passage of vibratory waves towards the crystal. About the coils. Some stands for examining watches, (not the case of yours
    1 point
  46. Servicing my 2nd Omega cal. 268 (service walk-through for my 1st here) I wasn't too happy with the state of the shellac holding the pallet stones in place. The shellac had crackled quite badly and some pieces had fallen off. So, I decided to remove and refit the pallet stones, and in the process I made a few more observations and experiences I'd like to share. 1. Removing the old shellac was not as easy as just soaking the pallets in isopropanol and brush it off. The shellac just wouldn't dissolve. The shellac only softened somewhat in the isopropanol despite leaving it in for over 30 min
    1 point
  47. At last, problem solved. Thanks, all the same.
    1 point
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