Jump to content

JohnR725

Member
  • Content Count

    940
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    29

JohnR725 last won the day on January 28

JohnR725 had the most liked content!

1 Follower

About JohnR725

  • Rank
    Super WRT Addict

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Not Telling
  • Location
    Seattle

Recent Profile Visitors

10,452 profile views
  1. From your description it sounds like you're doing everything correct except? Then for anyone reading this Elgin 16 size mainsprings are typically T brace. So you wind it into your mainspring winder leaving a little bit out. Put all of that into the barrel line up your slot with the T. Make sure the T is in the slot you'll have to push down to do that. Then you have to hold the T in place otherwise it jumps out. Some people use the end of their tweezer I usually use my large screwdriver. Because if you try to push the spring into the barrel without holding the T in place you will discover as you have it will not stay word supposed to be.
  2. if you look carefully in the small hole you'll notice that it is a trimmer capacitor used to regulate the watch. then we need a much better or basically a sharper picture because it's hard to tell if all your contacts for the battery are the way they're supposed to be.
  3. My reading skills totally suck I didn't notice the letter C and you're right that changes the answer totally. So the correct cross reference should look like this. 0310197 BALANCE COMPLETE WITH STUD SEK 7S26C 21 JEWELS SEK 7S36C
  4. The handle you purchased with the recess is the way it's supposed to be made. There designed specifically for NIVAFLEX Mainsprings which require a recess. Then there was the older style that doesn't have a recess which was made for the blued steel Springs as the modern style won't work with those at all. The problem is the Swiss assumption that all modern Springs are exactly the same leads to problems with the handles not always working. Then hand winding mainsprings is generally frowned upon in modern watch repair unfortunately sometimes it's necessary.
  5. 0310020 BALANCE COMPLETE 721/1909 BLF 12G1B2 21600 BPH-17JL-AUTO-CALD JUB 1201 JUB 1202 PUL Y621 QUA 12G1B2 21,600 BPH-17JL-AUTO-CALENDAR SEK 7001A 17 JL-21,600 BPH-DSS-AUTO SEK 7002A SEK 7005A 21,600 BPH-17 JL-SHOCK-DSS-AUTO-CALENDAR SEK 7006A 21,600 BPH-17 & 21 JL (19 JL)-DSS-AUTO-CALD(DAY DATE) SEK 7009A 21,600 BPH-17 JL-SHOCK-DSS-AUTO-CAL. (DAY DATE) SEK 7015A 21600 BPH 21JL AUTO CHRONO CALD (DAY/DATE) SEK 7016A 17JL 21600BPH CHRONO AUTO CALD DAY DATE SEK 7017A 21JL 21600 BPH AUTO CHRONO CALENDAR (DAY/DATE) SHOCK ADJ STD SEK 7018A 21600 BPH 23JL AUTO CHRONO CAL (DAY/DATE) ADJ STUD HOLD SEK 7018B 23JL 21600 BPH CHRONO AUTO CALD (DAY/DATE) SEK 7019A 21,600 BPH 21 JL DSS AUTO CAL (DAY-DATE) SEK 7025A 21,600 BPH-SHOCK-17 JL-DSS-AUTO-CALD W/CORR-ADJ STUD H SEK 7S26A SEK 7S36A SEE TECH GUIDE FOR DESCRIPTIONS OF DAY DIALS UTC 37 21,600 BPH 17JL DSS AUTO CAL UTC 38 21600 BPH-DSS-AUTO-CALD (DAY/DATE)-SHOCK WCX A331-1 21,600 BPH-17 JL-SHOCK-DSS-AUTO-CALENDAR WCX A361-1 21,600 BPH-17-19-21 JL-DSS-AUTO-CALD-(DAY-DATE) SHOCK
  6. I thought you might find this interesting normally Seiko doesn't have much for technical specifications for the watches but if you look in the 4006 a service information step number 12 image attached. I was having a discussion with another watchmaker regarding Seiko's amplitude and he told me about this. He was like the rest of you concerned over amplitude but decided that Seiko designed them to have low amplitude. There's nothing wrong with low amplitude as long as at the end of 24 hours the watch is still running and keeping time.
  7. It's always best if you're going to change the subject to start a new discussion as you have a greater audience to answer your question.
  8. If you look at the early Moebius Advertisements they claim their synthetic oils going by memory basically never go bad. But it's that's not entirely correct and there's another problem? The other problem for all of lubrication's is contamination. Like getting the oil out of the bottle usually insert something in that's a source of contamination. It's why Rolex supplies a lot of the lubricants in a syringe to prevent that. Contamination in the watch with time so the lubrication isn't going to last forever in a watch. The problem with the expiring date is the meaning isn't entirely clear? In other words service a watch on the day the oil expires does that mean the watch expires? Basically is a use by this date then the watch itself can go another five years or more. So for personal use I found that the Moebius Lubricants I had lasted at least 20 years until I was at a lecture where I was informed that it should be replaced much more often than that. So I replaced all my lubricants with brand-new lubricants and have decided that based on the cost and estimated life that unless I see a decrease of performance on a timing machine for personal watches I'm not going to worry about the date on the bottle. On the other hand at work especially because I'm not paying for the oil if the bottle says it's expired we will purchase new oil it's cheap insurance and it's a professional expense cost of doing business.
  9. I snipped out a section of your balance wheel hairspring image. It appears to be somebody has re- pinned your hairspring? Re-pinning the hairspring where they have versus the end where it probably should have been will make your watch go a lot faster.
  10. Reversers are interesting for lubrication. Some of them you can use the Lubetta V105 Which is basically an oil like 9010 dissolved in a solvent. But Rolex in their tech sheet shows that lubrication only wants to be in a very specific location and nowhere else. So that's why the recommending the surface treatment to keep the oil from spreading.
  11. Personally I use l&r But I did find you some helpful links. What is sometimes amusing is to look at the material safety sheets when they list the chemicals because you find a lot of times the difference in the fluids isn't really that much. Except Zenith isn't telling us what's in their secret formula. So the usual chemical to make things bright and shiny is some form of ammonia. Looks like both Zenith cleaning fluids you mentioned should make things bright and shiny. Then with your cleaning fluid you also need a rinse of similar chemical makeup as the cleaning fluid. Then all of the solvent-based cleaners will have fumes. Not so much when you're running the cleaner but more so when you're drying. Personally I just never really notice the films at least with the watch cleaning solutions. The water solution for clocks that l&r makes the ammonia smell is I basically have to go outside you probably should have some sort of respirator when using that. Glass jars work great for cleaning but if I'm interpreting your text correctly putting a tight fitting lid on would be bad. Anytime you have a solvent that gets warm it's going to evaporate With the possible to break the jar. Then even the ultrasonic action it's conceivable It's going to generate fumes. Then I think a little more clarification of your hairspring issue is needed? I don't think I've ever had a hairspring screwed up with an ultrasonic cleaner. https://www.zenithsolutions.net/productlist.htm https://blog.esslinger.com/zenith-watch-cleaners/ http://www.lrultrasonics.com/industries/jewelry/jwl.solutionsnb.html
  12. I think it would be helpful if you opened up your watch. Googling there's a fair amount of information on the movement out there including the first link which has a nice picture of the balance bridge. Notice it has what resembles the standard Rolex stud holder for putting the watch in beat. Then you really don't want to mess with the Parachrom hairspring collet unless you have a special tool and you know exactly what you're doing. https://rubberb.com/blog/technical-changes-of-the-rolex-explorer-ii-42mm/ http://static.rolex.com/flipboard/the-parachrom-hairspring.html
  13. Unfortunately that's a problem with watch repair of attempting to repair a problem that we still don't know or grasp what the problem is. It's obviously not a regulation issue it something else that we still don't grasp so attempting to make it into the problem that it is not and fixing that nonexistent problem usually doesn't always turn out well.
  14. If you look at the manufacturing information document it specifies that a serial number is placed on the mainspring barrel bridge which is what you have which means this is a chronometer grade movement. Then of course the 2892A2 Is the base movement. The other number is usually a date code possibly a location and a date code of where the movement was manufactured. When the watch is on the timing machine is it entirely reassembled? when you're having a problem like this I wouldn't put the automatic back on or any of the calendar components until you getting something decent on the timing machine.
×
×
  • Create New...