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Klassiker

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  1. Klassiker

    Case-back threads

    Hi Don, yes, so unusual that I haven't been able to find any useful tips anywhere else. Not even in the best books I have. So a big thanks to you and rodabod for giving me the benefit of your experience. I don't have a lathe, and at the moment I've nowhere to put one. Otherwise I'd be tempted to use this as an excuse to go shopping. I could measure the thread, but for the time being I'll just have to be content with the PTFE tape.
  2. Klassiker

    Case-back threads

    I tried the PTFE tape, and it worked well enough so that the threads engaged and I could screw the back on. I gave it a little tweak with the wrench, but it's only slightly more than finger-tight. It was on the wrist today and didn't work loose, so.....success, I guess. Thanks very much for the suggestion. Certainly for the moment that has saved me a lot of heartache. Maybe beginners luck, or maybe with a few more attempts I can get it to grip harder. I think I'll quit while I'm ahead though (for a while anyway). However, I fear it is only a matter of time before the threads part company again, with a further loss of profile. Anyone got a suggestion for a more permanent solution?
  3. Looks very similar to mine. They work fine. It's on the way, you say? When it arrives, put the watch on the grained rectangle and hold down the red button. Then slowly draw the watch away to at least arm's length. Have the watch running when you do it. Then have another look at the hairspring. Re your longer post above. You are welcome. I am pretty inexperienced myself, but it's nice to pass on something you've learned if it helps someone else along. The slightest bit of dust or oil will affect the hairspring, so if the demagnetising doesn't give a 100% cure, that would be the next thing to try. I like your attitude ("hobbies are nice to develop") so go for it with the removal of the balance cock and dipping in lighter fuel. You are going to need a screwdriver with the correct size blade, some very fine tweezers and some kind of hands-free magnification (x3 or thereabouts). Watch some videos of Mark removing and fitting balances before you start. It's delicate work, but possible if you go steady and use the right techniques. If you can't stand the thought of damaging it, leave it alone though. When you pressed on the regulator arm and stopped the balance wheel, chances are all you did was temporarily take out the end shake. I'd say "possibly" instead of "probably", but the possibly could be a few things (bent pivot, chipped jewel etc.). If there's only a very tiny amount of play on the balance, and the rim turns true then you probably got away with it. When the hairspring off-centre like that, it makes the timing very sensitive to positions. The watch might run fine face up, but turn it on it's side and it will gain or lose a lot. That means completely unpredictable behaviour when you wear it.
  4. Klassiker

    Case-back threads

    Thanks. I will try the PTFE tape tomorrow.
  5. Hello Ticky, some things to bear in mind, to put you on the right track or stop you making decisions you might regret. Demagnetising isn't expensive, if you want to rule it out. There are Chinese devices available for little money. That would be the first thing to try in my opinion. You appear to have regulated as good as it's going to get with the tools you have. What makes you sure it got dirty? If the problem was there before you opened it up the first time anyway, then oil could have spread from somewhere onto the hairspring. Yes you can remove the balance assembly (cock, wheel, spring) as one by just removing the one screw. You might want to try this, to make sure the coils aren't crossed. The problem you have seems to be one of sensitivity to position. Not surprising, if the coils are closing up so much on the one side. No amount of regulating will cure it. The most likely cause is contamination or magnetism. If you can rinse the balance and spring in the lighter fuel without dipping the jewel, then that would be worth a try. No, the timing shouldn't just go out after a few weeks or months of running. These are robust and reliable movements, once they are running well. Maybe get a basic service done by a professional? Then you will have peace of mind and a reliable watch you can trust and enjoy. No point buying another, if you're not happy with this one.
  6. Klassiker

    Case-back threads

    I have disassembled, lubricated and reassembled a number of movements and complete watches now, beginning with pocket watches and moving on to wristwatches. I have also attended some of the seminars offered by the DGC here in Germany. I would still classify myself very much as a beginner. One of the first wristwatches I began work on was my Grandad's old Summit with an AS 1700 movement. The filled gold case was worn and filthy, and the lugs were so damaged it was unwearable, so there was nothing to lose at that stage. However, I took the decision to invest some time and money into it, with the aim of making it wearable again. If I can get it finished to a reasonable standard I thing my Dad would like to have it. I have had the case repaired and refinished, and I have serviced the movement myself. I also cleaned the dial and re-lumed the hands, put a new crystal in and replaced the gaskets. Here are some before and after photos ( by the way, it's Dropbox. From past experience, when you follow the link, the pic is briefly displayed, then disappears. Click the button at the bottom (Oder weiter zur Webseite) to get it back). Thanks for looking! : A dirty face: https://www.dropbox.com/s/ujhlz1ihfv4urv2/DSC00865.JPG?dl=0 A clean face. So clean in fact, that the printing came off in the wash. Note to self: never put dials in the ultrasonic bath. https://www.dropbox.com/s/0q6ez1ick340y9r/DSC01367.JPG?dl=0 Damaged lugs, worn plating and a very dirty movement: https://www.dropbox.com/s/e7ijw5a0csfqpr4/DSC00877.JPG?dl=0 https://www.dropbox.com/s/d3mt0mhxf3q8bhi/DSC00879.JPG?dl=0 After refurbishing and service: https://www.dropbox.com/s/2y8k2rbg0usbnb0/DSC01368.JPG?dl=0 https://www.dropbox.com/s/0nrbw3onyk7blz4/DSC01369.JPG?dl=0 Maybe I should write a longer post with more photos of that process elsewhere. Progress is now stalled completely as I have a problem which, despite many searches here and on other forums, I can't find a solution for. At some stage the thread on the case-back and in the watch case itself have become so worn or damaged that they don't lock anymore. In fact, they are so loose now I can snap the back on and off. Here's a picture of the thread in the case: https://www.dropbox.com/s/dqe0ikoaokxazq4/DSC01362.JPG?dl=0 And here's the case-back: https://www.dropbox.com/s/949md0uwn8qindn/DSC01363.JPG?dl=0 I would appreciate any advice about what to do, and especially what not to do at this stage. It's hard to tell from these pictures, but I'm fairly sure the thread in the case itself is beyond repair. It may be possible to redress the one on the back. For sentimental reasons I'd like to preserve as much of the case and back as possible. The case-back for example has the family surname and some dates scratched in there, from the local watchmaker. I've considered just glueing everything together and hoping it comes apart again when I do the next service, or trying to regenerate a serviceable thread with two-component adhesive. Other than that, I suppose I'll have to wait until I get my first lathe! I'm open to any other ideas or tips you can offer. Also, if I've missed a thread showing what to do, please let me know.
  7. Klassiker

    Seiko 7019 balance wheel help needed

    Yes, sorry for being so vague. I was talking about the hairspring. WATCH REPAIR DISCUSSIONS Watch Repair Tools & Equipment My Demagnetiser is Magnetising The gist is, if you allow flexible components to vibrate in harmony wíth the magnetic field, the demagnetising effect is reduced or non-existent. Obvious really, but never occurred to me until I read the thread. If the balance and hairspring are out of the movement wrapping them in tissue paper is recommended (by Fried). If the movement is complete, demagnetising whilst it is running apparently works best. .
  8. Klassiker

    What is this bezel part?

    I'm just as much a beginner as you are, so I'd be out of my depth giving advice on how to proceed. I've never seen a flange or lip like this, but that's not saying a lot (Dennison). Does it look like a separate part? It looks like it to me from the close-up. Slightly different colour, and an edge to it. I have no idea where to get a replacement though, or how to fit it. If an experienced member doesn't come along soon to offer some useful advice I would ask Simon on The Watch Forum UK, or contact RePLATEit in Canada for repair advice and a quote. I'd be interested to hear how you get on.
  9. Klassiker

    What is this bezel part?

    I suspect it is part of the case, though not necessarily an integral part. By that I mean it can be replaced, hopefully. I don't think it's the tension ring from the acrylic crystal, as these are on the inside of the crystal, and wouldn't have contact to the case.
  10. Klassiker

    Seiko 7019 balance wheel help needed

    I'd try demagnetising first. Damping the spring (e.g. with Rodico or inside a poly bag) stops it vibrating in harmony with the A/C field. This is something I just learned on a different thread.
  11. Klassiker

    Is this the wrong spring??

    That is just bonkers! No wonder they sent you the wrong size. Well done for working it out. I checked Wikipedia, trying to understand the thinking behind this. Although it's not described directly, I guess it's something to do with the "American system of watch manufacturing".
  12. Klassiker

    Case back removal Seiko 5ACTUS

    What was the solution?
  13. Klassiker

    Is this the wrong spring??

    The spring in your photos measures 1.5mm high, not 3mm? I was reading the label on the packaging different to you. 3mm high, diameter 10.5mm and 13cm (or 130mm) long. Which thinking about it is far too low to be the length. And no information about the strip thickness is also unlikely. I am baffled, to be honest. Oh, wait! I just put the code number into Google and ended up at the same place quoted by rogart63, on the Cas-Kerr website. The dimensions are not mm but inches! Still don't make complete sense to me, but the 13 is probably the length in inches. As you can see from the discrepancy between watchguy uk (great blog and source of info for us beginners by the way) and Ranfft, the exact spring dimensions are not critical. Obviously it needs to fit in the barrel, and being too powerful (too thick, too wide) can also cause problems. There should be springs available on the market which will do the job, even if one of these two isn't available. There is an Ebay seller in Mannheim currently selling an NOS barrel complete for EUR 16.90, but maybe not posting to the US.
  14. Klassiker

    Is this the wrong spring??

    Hi Charlie, as you suspected, it's the wrong spring. As suggested above, I checked the Ranfft site (a bit tricky to navigate from the homepage - click the "pink pages" button, then "archive", then in the category list "Archive: Watch Movements", then search for AS 1700. The mainspring is listed as Zf675, 1.20 x 9.5 x 0.10 x 315mm. You appear to have been sold a 3mm deep spring instead of 1.2mm.
  15. Klassiker

    Help installing mainspring

    if the spring feels dry to the touch then I would definitely add grease. From what I can gather, it's hard to over-lubricate mainsprings. You just don't want it leaking out of the barrel and all over the rest of the movement. Not enough lubricant on the other hand is bad. If you've got the 8200 then use it. I'd put a smear on the inside face of the barrel and the same on the lid, then two or three spots on the coils once the spring is in, like margolisd shows in his post above.
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