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  1. Hi guys … I had promised that I would make a « custom decal dial tutorial » on another thread there So here we are … There are many variations of decal dials, the best IMHO being the « negative gilt » dials which gives the best results. The process I’m showing today is aabout how to make a dial with black printings on a one color background. I had a cheap quartz diver waiting in my drawers so I’ll make a Heuer diver hommage based on the 980.016 model (quartz one too). DAY 01 : It’s 4:30 AM (I’m an early bird) and I have 2
    23 points
  2. Well I would definitely start with Moebius 9010 (for train wheels and balance endstones) and 9020 (for train wheels) if you are working on Pocket Watches. Moebius 9415 is a must for Pallet/Escape wheel teeth. A quality silicon grease. Moebius D5 is essential (barrel arbor, motion work). Molycote DX or Moebius 9501 grease for keyless work. Moebius 9501 or 9504 for high friction (e.g. Cannon pinion, Setting lever spring and anything at high friction). Moebius 8200 grease for mainspring. Moebius 8217 for barrel wall (automatic watches) It's a lot but at a
    20 points
  3. ETA 7750 Service Walkthrough The 7750 was first available in 1974, having been one of the first movements to be designed with the aid of a computer. It's hard to believe that the 7750 is still the industry standard movement for chronographs considering it's history. It was developed over 40 years ago by Valjoux, who was then a legendary movement maker that was part of the giant ASUAG conglomerate. But by the end of 1975 production was stopped due to the onslaught of the Quartz Era, and the 7750, along with many other mechanical calibers, was abandoned. Industry demand for this mo
    18 points
  4. On behalf of "Watch Repair Talk" moderators, I would like to extend a warm welcome to all new members. This is a friendly place with plenty of knowledgeable people who have varying degrees of horological expertise, the great thing is they are willing to share that invaluable knowledge and help one another. To help us keep things running smoothly, I would ask all new members to read the forum rules and place their posts in the correct sections.
    18 points
  5. When fitting new stems to watches I use these tools :- Digital calipers, Fine grade diamond lap Wire cutter Pin vice Now for fitting. (1) Hold the stem in the pin vice and screw on the crown tightly by hand. (2) With the movement fitted correctly in the case, insert the stem until it locks in place. Now measure the gap between the case and the underside of the stem. In this case it is 2.16mm. (3) Subtract 0.2mm from this size and this will give the amount to remove from the stem. In this case it will be 1.96mm which will give 0.2mm clearance be
    17 points
  6. I spent the day literally watching paint dry. I was using black lacquer to fill in the engraving on a pocket watch case to make it stand out. I will send pictures when it is finished. In the mean time I was looking for screwdriver sharpening stone holders on the net. The sticker shock was amazing. So i said to myself, "Self" your only watching paint dry, make your own, you have a sharpening stone and some wood. So I made this from scrap wood while watching paint dry. I'm happy with it & it cost nothing. It is perhaps not as pretty as Bergeon but they have enough money.
    17 points
  7. You may have noticed a few changes - I have removed the Gallery section and the CMS pages app from the site as it costs too much to 'rent' those modules with comparatively very little use by members - it just did not make sense to keep them going. I apologise if this inconveniences or annoys anybody but I think it is better to keep the core of this website to be a discussion forum. The WRT website is costing me a lot of money per month to run and I am making a few changes to help with that - there is a little income from eBay affiliate ads but not enough to cover the cost of hosting and s
    16 points
  8. Here we go with part 2. Now it's easy to note, that I'm not a professional as the cleaning equipment is only... ehm... semi-professional. Special treatment for the balance and the pallet fork. The equipment for oiling and grease. Inserting the new mainspring. Reassembling the train bridge. Surprise: Much easier than on other watches, the parts fall into correct positions by themselves. Nice. Barrel bridge and ratchet system.
    16 points
  9. OK, so me and Mrs H did Christmas day with the family, and then we did Boxing day with the family, and then we were granted a day off so got to relax, and for me that meant I had the chance to tackle a little project that I had acquired as part of a job lot from a long retired watchmaker that had been sitting around in a shed for about 35 years (the job lot, not the watchmaker). Pocket watches are not usually my thing although I do own and use a couple. Orphaned pocket watch movements are even less my thing; but this little baby was in such a state that I couldn't resist the challeng
    16 points
  10. Hi, I teach watchmaking to complete beginners at Epping Forest Horology Centre, close to Epping and this is one of the lessons on the BFG 866. I wanted to show my class a classic pin pallet (Roskopf) movement and how to service it, as many watchmakers won't touch these watches as they hold no monetary value. Turn the setting lever screw 1 to 1 and a half turns to release the winding stem A piece of watch paper or small plastic jiffy bag to protect the dial, whilst removing the hands The driving pinion is part of the frict
    15 points
  11. Just before Christmas I sold (through the good offices of eBay) an absolutely immaculate example of a 19 jewel Sekonda hand winder. I was a little sad to see it go as I don't think I am likely to see another in as good order for some time, and having just serviced it it was running like a champ but I couldn't justify holding on to it. Well, shortly after it had arrived with its new owner I received a message through eBay from the buyer. Huw had contacted me to say how pleased he was with his new acquisition, and did I service watches? as he had another example of one of these that was a li
    15 points
  12. I haven't done one of these for a while and as this is my 1000th post I thought I would do something a little less ordinary. As the title says it's one of those crazy Russians, a USSR Sekonda from the 70's sporting a Slava 2428 in all its quirky glory. This one came to me as a non-runner and a preliminary investigation turned up a broken balance pivot so it went into the "to do" box until I could source a replacement, which it turned out I had all along from another watch previously scavenged for parts a while ago, as I discovered during a recent tidy up. So here goes......
    15 points
  13. We made a balance tack in school, but aside from that time I haven't really used it. A much handier tool is this one which was a standard tool made in watchmaking schools here. The "tack" is a threaded pin which can be placed in one of several holes (usually 2 or 3 sizes of tapers on several pins). Choosing an appropriate pin and hole location, the balance isn't hanging as it sits on the table, so no risk to the hairspring. The overarm presses down on the rim, which is supported from the inside by the little "V" so that work can easily be done on screws (it's a non-screw balance in the pic bu
    14 points
  14. The clock strikes Christmas 1975 and these two sister were each given a watch which they are, here on a picture, proudly showing off. Their last parent recently passed away and in the parents "jewellery-box" one of the thought long lost watches emerged again. Inside the back-lid was the name S.Kocher stamped, a Swiss company long gone, went begin 1980's during the "Quartz"-crisis under. The watch was in their line of the "Royce"-watches and had an undisturbed Swiss 21.600BHP, 17-jewels AS1726 cheased /non-running movement.
    13 points
  15. One of the great things about collecting and repairing is that feeling of taking a bunch of parts and making a working watch again. This restore begins with a scrap pile of cases from a former Timex repair center. I chose a late 1960's Marlin case that is missing the stem tube. So to the parts stash and one issue resolved. Off it than goes to get a bath in cleaning solution , polished, new crystal added along with correct case back. Next I service a used #24 movement also from the same lot the cases came with and the assembly begins. Since the hands are chromed, I just us
    13 points
  16. This is a bit of a departure for me as I usually like to play with stuff a little more vintage and a little more Swiss. That being said I have done a few vintage Russians in the past and this is a watch that I had been curious about for some time. I picked this one up at a car boot sale last summer for just £3 in a less than wonderful state. As you can see, the seconds hand was off and it was described a not running. It turned out that it did run, just not too well and the hour and minute hands didn't move. Canon pinion anyone? First impression with the back off is pretty en
    13 points
  17. Hello All; On my desk landed a 1975 Omega Speedmaster professional Mark II. It was in a sorry state and water ingress was suspected. The last services were quite a few years ago, mid '80's towards the '90's. Those services were performed by a watchmaker working for a local highly reputable jeweler with a glossy facade. Instead of using the proper tools (a guide-ring) to replace the glass, for ease or necessity the official seal-ring was taken out and the glass was placed using a black sealing-kit. The back-cover received the same treatment, instead of the correct O-ring, the O-ring groove
    13 points
  18. Greetings all! My first post here so I'll try to start with a good one... I've been fixing and servicing watches full time for a few years now but this one that came in recently is probably one of my biggest saves. It belongs to a guy called Paul who's a pretty serious Seiko collector and sends me a couple of watches each month for servicing. He spotted this 6105-8000 on ebay which appeared to be in good cosmetic condition but was listed as non-running / needs a service - There was no picture of the movement with the seller saying the back was too tight and he didn't ha
    13 points
  19. Intro A while back I successfully made my first attempt refitting and adjusting pallet stones using shellac. It was something I had dreaded doing (it seemed difficult) but in the end it wasn’t that difficult at all. Having gathered experience from a few years of handling tiny watch parts using tweezers and having developed some left-hand dexterity as well (I’m right handed) probably helped. Anyway, I thought I’d share the experience with anyone who would be interested and hopefully there’ll be some other WR-talker, now or in the future, who’ll find it useful. If you’re new to th
    12 points
  20. Hello, everybody. I wanted to share my restoration stories that I have done for a long time and thrown into my archive. First I discussed the Atomic Mars 71 Brand using Valjoux 7734. As it was seen, scratch and dial is broken. To begin with, I tried to brush the Case as Brushed and make it the first day. If it is decorated, I polished and re-painted the indexes (with acrylic paint). I usually do this in three layers so that the paint is not deleted in a short time. I replaced the case buttons and tubes with aftermarket buttons. Since the condition of the dial was in ver
    12 points
  21. I have been collecting and restoring these machines since 1970. david
    12 points
  22. Hello all, This build took me 2 months to finish; mostly due to the shipments delay from Europe. But here it is. A watch designed by me. Well at least put together by me. When I decided on this project it was very important to me that I used as many Swiss components as I can. This is just a personal preference. Searching for parts I found a NOS dial that at one time were used by Ollech & Wajs. I got super excited since they were used for vintage Unitas 6497s. The movement I planned to use. Speaking of which, I took a Unitas out of an old pocket watch from the early 60s. I found the
    12 points
  23. So it's been a few months since I posted here...but I've been regularly checking in. Hi Mark and Geo! So as a few of you know, I have a hobby of building watches. The one thing I hated was relying on some of the very few companies that actually print dials. Here is the USA there are only a handful that do this type of work! I was lucky enough to find an antique dial printing machine on eBay. It was just a vessel to move the dial from printing plate to paint application. I found a willing company to "Fill in the Blanks!" I won't name them here because I don't want to seem like I'm Selling
    12 points
  24. Seiko 7S26A Complete Service Background I have a good friend, a brother in Christ Jesus, who I've known for many years. He knows I've embarked on retraining myself for a new career in Watchmaking, and seen my first two restored watches. He told me that his old faithful Seiko 5, which he's worn everyday for 12 years, has recently had issues. Occasionally it will advance rapidly in time (up to an hour in a few seconds) and then just keep ticking away normally. I told him I'd be happy to take a look at it, and put it on my ACEtimer Timegrapher. The pattern on the screen looke
    12 points
  25. First of all my apologies for not having documented the disassembling, but the watch arrived in a terrible condition and I stripped it down right away to get rid of all that dirt. If you have worked on some watches yet and think about entering the chronograph world with a 7734 let me give you 3 advices: Do it! The 7734 is a solid construction and not too complicated. Take your time and watch all the 6 parts of Mark's Venus 175-service on youtube. Of course the Venus is a column wheel system, but the basic movement is very similar and also on the chrono layer you can le
    11 points
  26. Here is my cat "Lew" helping me adjust a pocket watch and adding a hair to places one should never be.
    11 points
  27. I had a need to safely remove a C clip holding in two pusher buttons and thought I would share my method on the forum. I had a spring bar removal tool with a solid pin on one end and a scalloped forked end on the other. I placed a small bit of rodico on the bottom side of the clip and turned the C <- gap facing up. As you can see in the picture, I simply used the forked end that was the perfect gap to push off the c clips. I installed by getting the clip in place, C gap facing down, and used a #200 flat screwdriver blade and carefully pressed down to lock in place. I used the cas
    11 points
  28. I have a few more but these are the “keepers” that are in regular rotation Might make a separate projects post but the blue dialed one with no brand name is one I made from parts from eBay after getting inspired to do so by mark’s project.
    11 points
  29. I'm very satisfied with how this dial turned out. I'm building and Elgin pocket watch conversion into wristwatch and wanted a vintage military dial look. I had recently purchased a lume kit but hadn't had the chance to use it yet. I design the dial with bold outlined numerals for the purpose of filling with lume. It really turned out better than I ever hoped! The first dial I did turned out very acceptable, except that I had another issue with it and had to start over. I learned quite a bit just from doing that one dial. Once I had the printing plate made I repainted the origin
    11 points
  30. I haven't worn my Bulova Precisionist for, probably, over a couple of years. It's been sat in a case, along with others of my collection, ticking gently away. Anyway, I thought I'd get it on the wrist today - what with the clocks going back an hour this weekend. I took it out of the case and checked the time against the atomic clock - it was exactly, to the second, one hour fast. In other words, though not changed to compensate for changes in BST and back over two years or so, it had otherwise kept completely accurate time. The second hand is sweeping as smoothly as you would expect from
    11 points
  31. This is the first installment of what I hope will be a series of updates on my experience at the York Time Institute. In Lesson 1 of the Chicago School of Watchmaking's Master Watchmaking Shop Training and Job Guides, Thomas B. Sweazey says, The second sentence of this quote spells out the ethos of the York Time Institute as expressed by its director Daniel Neid. "Dan" is firmly committed to the idea that his students will not only be able to make repairs from stock parts but also, if necessary, be able to make parts when necessary. Not only that he will also be able to understand al
    11 points
  32. This project has been ongoing for about six months. Another specimen from the box-o-watches. It was a mess when I dug it out. The dial was a wreck. It had the alarm, minute, and hour hand but no second hand. At the time, I did not know it was supposed to have one. Found out later that the center wheel was busted. The first threshold was to see if I could get the dial refinished. I won't go into the ordeal, but it took about four months from start to finish! I had a crystal in my stock so that was not an issue. I bought a donor watch that had some of the parts I needed and the
    10 points
  33. Part 3 is a sort of redemption, or at least some lessons learned. The donor arrived about six weeks later (thank you Covid) and I quickly transferred the balance complete. The wavy traces quickly returned. So I stripped the movement again, paying close attention to the barrel arbor bearings. Looking closely, I could see that the barrel had actually been scraping the bottom of the barrel bridge. Manipulating the barrel with the bridge on and the train removed, I could also see that, under torque, the barrel would foul both the bridge and possibly the mainplate. Swapping in the donor m
    10 points
  34. My 1961 Omega Constellation. Hard to believe its 60 years old. I don't think the Omega bracelet is correct . I believe these types came out in 62'. Doesn't matter since I like these more squared grains more. CAL 561 under the hood.
    10 points
  35. Today.... My 1940's Heuer Ref 347. Rugged looking watch with its battle scared dial. It has a Valjoux 22 under the hood. It's quite a large case for the time which gives it more of a contemporary flair. I were this one quite often.
    10 points
  36. Hi Cecking through my workshop laptop I came across these PDFs and thought they might be useful to the members new and old alike. I have several more and will post later. Cheers Witschi Training Course.pdf TZIllustratedGlossary (1).pdf handbook_of_watch_and_clock_repairsa.pdf Test and measuring technology mechanical watches.pdf
    10 points
  37. Hey guys, I have been working on a project to make my own watch dials over the past few months. I thought I would share my progress with you thus far. It has been an awfully expensive endeavour, and I have yet to reach a final dial but the work is well underway. I have purchased a pad printing machine, speciality inks and pads as well as a custom engraved cliche of my design. Now I’m putting it all together, I have been practing printing on plastic watch crystals, until I have my silver dials complete to print on. Let me know if you have any questions. Cheers
    10 points
  38. ETA 955 Service Walkthrough "The Workhorse of Highend Quartz" The ETA 955 and 956 Quartz Movements are the most commonly found movement in high-end quartz watches with three hands and a date feature. You will find them in Omega, Tag, and many other brands on the market. For this walkthrough I will be using an 955.412 Movement as my example; but the 956 is so similar to the 955, that this walkthrough will suffice for both. Please note that the numbers after the decimal place only relates to the factory in which the movement was made, so yours could read 955.112, or another factory nu
    10 points
  39. I could not find a single video on how to wind a mainspring back into the barrel after cleaning. I purchased a three set tool and figured it out myself and then made a video for others to learn. Thanks Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    10 points
  40. I got this Seiko 6139-6002 for pennies on the dollar albeit it was not working, in poor physical condition and with missing and damaged parts. I used after-market parts to “restore” this watch to a portion of its lost glory. This will go down as one of my favorite repair and restoration projects.
    10 points
  41. A few months back, I purchased online this Breitling Navitimer for a fair price despite the fact that the watch was non-functioning at the time. I did this without seeing the movement which was a bit of a risk as there was the possibility the insides were rusted out, but the price was right and the I figured I could resell the case and dial if the rest turned out to be a disaster. Things looked bad when I received the watch as it wouldn't run at all and the pushers were jammed. I noted on inspection that the dial didn't sit flush either which caused me quite a bit of concern. Rem
    10 points
  42. This should put your mind at rest. Click on this link. http://members.iinet.net.au/~fotoplot/sdriver/sdriver.html
    10 points
  43. Hi I've just joined the forum so by way of an introduction and where I am in this hobby, I'm posting this build of a 6498. It's not a full walkthrough but this forum seems the best place for it. I usually work on older watches but have been meaning to have a go at one of these for some time and received a 20% discount offer from PayPal so I picked up an ETA6498-1, dial and hands on eBay. The case came from elsewhere. There are loads of people selling these as kits to build your own watch. This is just about the most basic movement you can buy, with no complications. There are two calibres i
    10 points
  44. I purchased a cheap Chinese crystal press when I took up watch repairing/refurbishing a few years ago, this was one of the lever operated type with nylon dies. This has served me very well, but there are some jobs that a screw type of press is far better for because of the more sensitive control. Being a canny Scot, I kept an eye on eBay for a second hand Robur or Horotec and stumbled across this antique home made press for £14 delivered. The engineer in me immediately saw the potential, all it needed was stripped down, modified to take new dies and repainted. The other thing that was re
    10 points
  45. Influenced by Lawson's post 'Carl Zeiss - Eye Mag Pro' I bought a cheaper 6x 350mm pair of Galilean binoculars from China. These are intended for dental use but any dentist trying to use a 6x magnification mutst have control of the head position far better than I can manage. The viewed object was wobbling by about 50% of the 45 mm field of view. The optical quality is excellent and so I have turned them into a binocular microscope using a heavy duty flexible support with standard end pieces as sold for microphones. Here in the bench mode with a Benson Aquatite movement - amp
    10 points
  46. This beauty arrived today. My first jeweling tool. So excited
    9 points
  47. Ask a lubrication related question and you will get as many different answers as you do responses. However, here is my take on it. Consider the amount of movement and the forces involved at the pallet fork pivot compared to elsewhere in the watch, and weigh up the pro's and con's for leaving it dry. The torque at the pallet fork pivot is probably less than anywhere else in the movement, and the angle of rotation of the pivot in the jewel is something like 5 to 10 degrees. As a result the rate of wear through friction at this point is minimal and so any advantage (from a friction wear
    9 points
  48. Sometimes with old movements after you go through the normal cleaning cycles including pegging the jewels, you still find old oil that has turned to hard varnish left in the oil sinks. This has happened to me on a few occasions and I started thinking there has to be an easier way than soaking in acetone and going through the pegging process again. A couple of weeks ago I was at the dentist and found the answer in my mouth............the ultrasonic probe. When returned home, I fired up my iPad and started searching eBay for a second hand dental unit and got lucky. I managed to get the unit
    9 points
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