david

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david last won the day on September 11

david had the most liked content!

About david

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    WRT Addict

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    Male
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    Manufacturing tools and watch parts.

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  1. Lathe Belts and Oiling

    JD Ricahad, Yes, those are the type of lathe belts I can't stand. They are the very reason I switched over to O-Rings. I went through the learning curve with the welded belts as well. Even a welded belt that looks perfect still has a hard spot at the seam. I know that some people swear by welded belts but I prefer the seamless O-Rings. david
  2. Lathe Belts and Oiling

    JDRichard, The diameter I like the best is 3/16 of an inch. If you go the the MSC section on O-Rings you will find pages of different rings cataloged according to diameter and length. The rings are given a number called a dash number but there will be an explanation on how to convert the size you are looking for to that number. david
  3. Lathe Belts and Oiling

    For the lathe cone bearigs I prefer something a little thicker than 3 & 1 oil. I use hydraulic oil but a thin motor oil will also work. I purchase my hydraulic oil in a 5 gallon metal bucket from a hardware store. This is because I also use it as a solvent in a small solvent sink. For cone bearing applications a small should last several lifetimes. Small quantities can be purchased from an auto parts store. david
  4. Lathe Belts and Oiling

    For the lathe cone bearigs I prefer something a little thicker than 3 & 1 oil. I use hydraulic oil but a thin motor oil will also work. I purchase my hydraulic oil in a 5 gallon metal bucket from a hardware store. This is because I also use it as a solvent in a small solvent sink. For cone bearing applications a small should last several lifetimes. Small quantities can be purchased from an auto parts store. david
  5. Lathe Belts and Oiling

    Years ago I switched from the "welded" belts to seemless O-Rings. They are stronger, grip better, last longer, are inexpensive, and most importantly for me, they don't make a clacking sound every time the seam in the belt hits a pulley. I purchased mine from MSC but any industrial supplier should be able to provide them. As luck would have it, the cheapest belt material worked out to be the best for the lathe application. david
  6. And this is a video of the Patek Phillipe company attempting to convey the idea that this is how their watches are actually made. https://youtu.be/bhRqIhHZkmk
  7. This is a video of a watchmaker using traditional methods to make a balance staff.
  8. Punches needed

    Cousins was a miserable company to deal with. Their only redeeming quality was their prices were a little better than other distributors but they jacked up them up and they now have no redeeming qualities. david
  9. That is assuming that these companies make all of their watch parts in house. The SWATCH GROUP manufactures a lot of watch parts that are supplied to the Swiss watch factories. There are also companies that supply items such as jewels and hairsprings but as far as I know SWATCH has been buying these companies in order to monopolize the Swiss watch part business. To me the whole thing looks like a marketing scam. When you think about it, a part cut out with a wire EDM in Switzerland and a part cut out with a wire EDM in any other country is still a part cut out on a wire EDM. Watches are produced in these quantities using engineers, toolmakers, set up technicians, inspection departments, assembly lines etc. They are not produced by watchmakers. Roger Smith is a watchmaker, as are his employees, and he can only produce 10 or so watches a year. The major Swiss watch factories are cranking out around 150 or so watches per work day. david
  10. Patek Phillippe put out a YouTube video showing their guy who makes pivots. According to the video, this guy spent more than 20 years of his life doing nothing but making pivots on a set of turns. Personally I don't think that Patek Phillippe makes all of their pivots this way as they crank out over 46,000 watches a year. It is however an interesting video. Maybe someone could post the link. david
  11. JDM, No, you still cut the same way as in a lathe but with a bow you can only cut on the forward stroke. Lathes were invented long before motors and the bow was the initial way to power them. david
  12. JDm, That is why it is "sort of" instead of "exactly". This is just speculation on my part and there may be no one alive today who really knows Why Boley added this feature to their lathe. At the time the F1 came out there were probably a large number of watchmakers who made pivots exclusively on turns. This is again speculation on my part, but Boley may have viewed this as a potential market and tried to entice the old school 1930s watchmakers to move up to the 1950s technology; who knows. david
  13. Some Of My Watch Lathes

    About 2 years ago I bought the complete set of 8mm WW collets from Sincere. The collet set cost me more than twice what I initially paid for the lathe. The lathe was $450.00 when I bought it many years ago. This price included the cross slide, lever collet holding tailstock and free shipping. Since I bought it, price increases have almost doubled the cost of the basic lathe package. When I brought this up on another forum years ago the usual nasty comments came out calling the machine "a piece of Chinese junk". These comments were made by people who never used the machine. With only a few exceptions (Boley F1, Star, Cowells) I also have every other model of watchmaker lathe in existence, so I had other machines to compare it to. In some respects, I took a chance when I bought it, but it turned out to be an extremely accurate, dependable lathe. Personally, I am very happy with the machine. I gradually added the other accessories over subsequent years and pretty much have everything Sincere offers for the lathe. Their quiet running induction motor was around $200.00 but I like it much better than the brush type universal motors that are normally used. The induction motor turns the same RPM whether running free or under a load during a cut. This helps keep a consistant chip load and reduces pivot breakage during the turning operation. david
  14. After watching the video of the friction drive in action, it looks like Boley added it to sort of duplicate the rotational movement you get from using turns and a bow. This would give a little more feedback to the graver which could help avoid breaking off the pivot in the turning operation. david