Jump to content

Marc

Member
  • Content count

    1,287
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    47

Marc last won the day on May 22

Marc had the most liked content!

1 Follower

About Marc

  • Rank
    Distinguished Member

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Northampton, England

Recent Profile Visitors

11,931 profile views
  1. Marc

    Vostok questions

    There definitely seems to be a hair spring issue but this will have no impact what so ever on the refitting of the train bridge. Your photos imply that you have installed the barrel bridge, pallet bridge, and balance cock before attempting to install the train bridge. Or that you've removed the train bridge without removing anything else and are now trying to reassemble. This I believe will only make life difficult because the pallet fork will seriously restrict the movement of the escape wheel, and as all the wheels are meshed together, all of the other train wheels as well, thus considerably reducing your ability to jiggle pivots into place. I always follow a specific assembly order (which may or may not be an accepted standard practise) which seems to make relocating pivots as painless as possible. If the movement has a separate escape wheel cock then I start with that, otherwise I start with the train bridge. With nothing else on the main plate there is plenty of room to fiddle everything into place and all of the wheels are clear of obstructions that could limit movement. Once I'm happy with the freedom and function of the train I then I install the barrel bridge. At this point it is possible to properly test the transmission of power all the way from the main spring to the escape wheel, and once this has been proved satisfactory I then install the pallets and the balance. It is sometimes necessary to install the barrel and train bridges together but the pallet and balance should always go in last otherwise it is impossible to test the freedom of the train. Hope this helps.
  2. Marc

    Felca (?) movement id help

    Looks like a Felsa 100 series movement.
  3. worth a read http://www.timezone.com/2002/11/04/83-jewels-too-many-part-1-92502/
  4. To help clarify a little, the roundels that @jdm refers to might also be called washers, the sort that would you find with the nuts and bolts and other fixings at an iron mongers or hardware store.
  5. Marc

    Minute hand problems....

    Yes and no..... In a sub-seconds or a direct driven centre seconds configuration the seconds hand is indeed mounted on the fourth wheel. But in an indirect driven centre seconds configuration (which is what your illustration appears to be) the seconds hand is mounted on its own pinion which is usually driven by the third wheel.
  6. Mark has a video for that.
  7. My guess is that they are parts interchangeability data for ETA movements, detailing part numbers and all of the different calibres that each part fits. Potentially still a very useful resource today.
  8. This may help; http://watchguy.co.uk/service-omega-speedmaster-calibre-1140-dubois-depraz-3220-with-eta-2890-2/
  9. That's a cracking collection of clocks, and some really nice restoration work. Thanks for showing. The only pitfall of so many clocks is, as my wife keeps reminding me, that where a man with a clock knows the time, a man with two clocks is never quite sure!!
  10. Correct. The timing of the date change is determined by precisely where you position the hands when you reinstall them. Correct, and this was the point of my post above. The printing of the OP's date ring is unique and specific to the orientation of date window to crown on his particular watch. Some of the previous advice seemed to be suggesting that he could do a movement swap with a standard movement that has a different date window / crown orientation and not have to change the date wheel to the one specific to his watch. Further up the thread I had pointed out that this would result in a slight misalignment in the date window but my advice was being (quite strongly) questioned (no problem with that, it's part of the "scientific method" upon which all true learning is based) hence the detailed presentation of my arguments above. If the time I put into my post results in time and frustration saved by the OP when he sorts out his watch then it was time well spent. Correct.
  11. Marc

    Watch of Today

    Whilst on the subject of Bulova divers, here's my contribution from 1979.
  12. You could of course replace the pendant tube with a generic one with the threads on the outside, and the crown with a generic crown that has the threads on the inside. https://www.cousinsuk.com/product/external-thread-tubes for press fit tubes; https://www.cousinsuk.com/product/double-threaded-tubes for screw in tubes; https://www.cousinsuk.com/category/screwdown-watch-crowns for crowns. However, this would require a certain watchmaking and machining capability (but well within the grasp of a decent independent watchmaker), would de-value the watch by a significant margin, and may not solve the problem. If it were mine and I couldn't see the cause of the problem myself I would be inclined to find an independent watchmaker who I could talk to in person (that rules out anything Swatch sponsored) and who could look at the watch on the premises so that I could get a qualified second opinion as to the cause of the problem. Your AD has already had a go and failed to resolve the issue (even if they did manage to ease the symptons for a while) so a second opinion would be justified. And it may well be the case that the problem lies with (inadvertent) mis-use rather than the watch itself. However, the whole design philosophy behind this type of watch is to produce something that is rugged and hard wearing, so you would have to be giving it a fair bit of grief to damage the threads. As JDM pointed out; In which case the original AD repair should be called into question if such issues haven't been properly addressed. Is the repair work covered by a warranty of any kind?
  13. I'm not sure that we are talking about the same watch. As can be seen in the picture below (taken from the original post) the watch has the crown @ 4, and the date @ 4:24; 30° and 42° offset from the 3 position respectively. To bring the date window alignment concurrent with the crown (as would be the case with a watch that has both date and crown at 3) the date window in the dial would have to be moved 12° anticlockwise relative to the dial numbering, which would put the date at 4 concurrent with the crown. If you then move the dial feet 30° clockwise you would then have a dial that would result in both crown and date window at 3, however let's keep the date window and crown at 4. The problem is that the date wheel detents which hold the date ring in the correct position to show the date in the window are spaced at 11.61290323° (360/31) intervals and not 12°, and the date jumper is fixed in the same position in the movement regardless of date window position. Therefore displacing the date window in the dial by 12° without displacing the date wheel printing relative to the date wheel detents by the same 12° will result in a misalignment between window and numbers of ≈ 0.387°. The drawings below illustrate the problem, the first in general and the second in detail. There are in fact 31 possible positions on a dial where you could site the date window without having to change the date wheel printing relative to the date wheel detents and they are at ≈ 23 minute and 13.548 second intervals. To put it another way the drawing below shows a date wheel that aligns correctly with a date window at 3, with possible date windows at all the other hour positions. Only the 3 position is correctly aligned. If the OP simply does a movement swap with a standard (date @ 3 position) movement without changing out the date wheel for the original there will be a slight but noticeable angular misalignment between the window and the date wheel printing.
  14. If you look at the photo in the original post you can see that the date is offet from the crown by 12° so they are not concurrent. Date wheels have 31 divisions which means a rotation of just over 11.61° at each date change. If you were to rotate the date window back by 12° to bring it into line with the crown but still use the original date ring the ring would be out of alignment with the window by just under 0.4°, not a lot but enough to notice and be really irritating.
×