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  1. This Master Craft Mainspring Winder has been recommended and praised several times by @clockboy and I’m so happy that I, after several years of trying to acquire one, finally found a copy in very good condition on eBay. The Master Craft mainspring winder is surprisingly easy and convenient to use, and of the mainspring winder variants that I have tried so far, K&D 128, and Bergeon style winders, I must say that the Master Craft winder is the one that I now prefer with a good margin. Maybe a bit exaggerated, but I always dread and feel tense using my other mainspring winders, especially the K&D 128, but with the Master Craft I feel perfectly confident every time. It’s simply a joy to use and handle! There are several things with the Master Craft mainspring winder that I especially appreciate: The transparent discs of the winding arbors that make it so much easier to understand what is going on with the mainspring, both when you crank it in and especially when it’s to be detached from the winding arbor. The gauges that make it superfluous to measure the inside of the mainspring barrel. Instead, you can just try out which gauge best fits in the mainspring barrel and that’s it. That the mainspring can be transferred into the mainspring barrel from either side of the transfer plate to provide for right- or left-hand coiling. A nice feature too is that these transfer plates are coin edged making them easy to attach and detach from the holder. That the mainspring is so easy to crank into the transfer plate as the contact area between the mainspring and the transfer plate is so small. It almost feels as if the spring has lost 50 % of its tension. It also makes it quite easy to pull out the mainspring a bit from the transfer plate if you happen to crank it too far to get the bridle in. That it’s so easy to get the hook on the winding arbor to attach to the hole/eye in the inner coil of the mainspring. Using the suggested "method 1" in the user manual, I just push the winding arbor down in the inner coil of the mainspring while I crank it and the arbor hook automatically finds its way into the hole/eye in the mainspring. Conclusively, I must say that I’m super happy with this cleverly devised mainspring winder. It exceeded all that I was hoping for and was expecting! So much that I felt an obligation to write this post.
    8 points
  2. 1970 Seiko 5606-7000 with hand made stamp dial. Running at 0 SPD and amplitude over 300 degrees at full wind.
    6 points
  3. I just wanted to share this technique that gave me a great result and is very quick. Using the tip of a cocktail stick with a small divot in the end made with a 1mm dia drill. Dip the stick in a bit of Molykote 111 and then push the pointed end of the stick into the o ring. Using brass tweezers push the o ring half way along the stick. Pick up the pusher between finger and thumb of left hand and hold the stick against the end of the pusher ( with end of pusher in the 1mm divot). Slide the o ring along the stick with the tweezers and it just goes into place very easily. Hope this makes sense. How do you guys do this? Is there a specific tool that you should use? Steve.
    6 points
  4. Here is my latest ebay acquisition. A Waltham Colonial pocket watch. This one was in pretty good nick. I disassembled, cleaned and oiled. No broken parts on this one.
    6 points
  5. This curious little ladies pendant watch was manufactured long before transparent Swatches arrived on the scent. I'm going to guess this is from the late 1950s or early 1960s, but it is difficult to tell, as the caliber looks older, perhaps 1940s. There is quite a lot of wear on the acrylic and the plating, and since it is not shock protected, there is a pretty high chance the balance pivots may be damaged, but even if it proves unrepairable it is still quite an interesting piece.
    6 points
  6. Inspired by the Mastercraft winder I tried to use its principle for a „quick and dirty“ mainspring winder. The spring I used for testing has an arbor diameter of 2,2mm (left wound) and the barrel has an ID of 8mm. The mainspring has a hight of 1,2mm. So I found a washer with the right thickness of 1,2mm, drilled it to 7,5mm ID and cut a slot in with my dremel. Then the washer was fixed to a board with three tiny drops of super glue. I used the original lid and arbor and my pin vice to complete the tool. The rest is selfexplaining looking at the pics. Any thoughts?
    5 points
  7. Morning all. well all finished now both watches have had new crystal glass fitted. the black one I washed in the sonic cleaner yesterday, I wasn't expecting the amount of dirt that came of it, I even found a shell of a ladybird or something floating in the cleaning solution. but thinking about it I really think I bought a polish for metal while I was at a flea market some time but anyway I didn't except the amount of dirt. The white face watch was bought on ebay just to practice on before I opened up the black one. This was the best move I ever made because on removing the stem I didn't pull it to time setting so I had to strip down face side to address the reason it wouldn't accept the stem. I'm really pleased to say that both watch are all cleaned and back together. I bought the black faced fossil while on holiday well the wife bought it for me so it will always have a special place in my heart.
    5 points
  8. Well, I am very, very pleased to report that I have fixed the problem! The yoke was indeed bent, (Right where you said it was Kalanag) and I was able to bend it back into the correct position and now the date corrector works perfectly ! (and all other positions now work smoothly too). I must say that I am flabbergasted at how week the metal is, it is SO easy to bend this part. I now know that I bent the yoke while trying to insert the stem with it misaligned to the square hole in the crown wheel. This is a VERY fragile part and it is an understatement that one must be extremely gentle when inserting the stem. THANK YOU ALL SO MUCH for your help with this. I have learned SO many valuable lessons here. And what a GREAT feeling to have fixed it myself! Thank you again! Bill
    5 points
  9. The experiment begins. Both dimes were heated to about 300c and then had a flake of garnet shellac laid on top. And then heated some more. 99% isopropyl on the left, denatured ethanol (containing up to 50% methanol) on the right. The ethanol may have some percent of water because i have had the gallon can of it for i think a couple years now. I use it to fuel alcohol lamps because it burns clean, unlike iso. The quantities of alcohol may be a little different but they are both immersed. These are 10g polystyrene lip balm containers i bought on ebay to hold small parts. They are reasonably air-tight when tightly closed but can then become hard to open. For acetone or limonene i would need to use some other container but i could do naphtha and odorless mineral spirits in these. I think we're all agreed that odorless mineral spirit aka stoddard solvent doesn't do anything to shellac, though. These photos seem to show up in reverse order, but as expected inside a half hour the ethanol side is completely dissolved. The isopropyl side is partially dissolved but largely intact. i'd say isopropyl is probably not going to harm an impulse jewel setting or pallet stone in a brief rinse. An extended, agitated rinse, is probably not a great idea. Maybe next I'll see what happens in isopropyl in ultrasonic?
    5 points
  10. Hi @rossjackson01 I've found that BB was the brand Brooks and Bentley. Here's another watch from this brand showing your logo and details on the certificate indicating a UK based brand.
    5 points
  11. Well my stereo microscope has arrived All turned around
    5 points
  12. Hello and good morning, Just to say I find the new background a lot easier and not so hard on the eyes. brilliant. And as regards the moving question which Mark quite rightly nipped in the bud, I think Old Hippys suggestion is probaby the right one. One cannot please every one but as said a compromise has to be found and informing the member his post was moved and why is a good compromise. I am sure that we all have faith in our Administrator and moderaters to find the solution and continue to provide a brilliant forum which is open minded and informative. Thank you Gentlemen your work is appreciated.
    5 points
  13. Forum policy will not be discussed publicly on the board. If you have suggestions or concerns then kindly contact a member of the volunteer Moderators or Myself via PM. To those who have strong opinions on how Moderators (all of whom volunteer their free time to help support this project), then I would say - you are welcome to put your hat in the ring and volunteer yourself, I have on several occasions in the past invited people to apply and rarely does anybody step up. None of us are getting paid to do this, the website barely breaks even financially (despite people complaining to me about ads) and so its disheartening when people complain. So back to the subject of this post - Suggestions on policy are very welcome, but not publicly as I don't want arguments or divisiveness. Policy suggestions from members will be discussed by the team and decided upon. Thank you.
    5 points
  14. I have been informed by the makers of the software of this board that sign-in with Display Name is very bad from a security perspective and this does seem logical so I have disabled it. Before you could choose to use either your Display Name or your Email Address. From now on, sign-in is only available using your Email Address which you signed up with. Your password is not affected. If you have forgotten your password then you can, of course, use the "Forgot Password" feature to reset it. Further to this, I have disabled the ability to sign in with Social Media apps such as Twitter and Facebook due to the constant battle with their respective changes in policy and requirements, I just don't have time to keep up with them which leads to website errors and a poor experience overall.
    5 points
  15. When I have needed to move a post I always message the member explaining the reason and wait for an OK. That is I think the polite way to go.
    5 points
  16. Hello all. Actually thought I registered for this site back when I took the watch repair course but guess I was wrong. My name is Chris. I am retired military and have been working on clocks for around 8 years. My dad owns a clock shop and taught me everything I know on clocks. I recently just graduated watchmaking at Gem City College in Quincy, IL. Will be moving to Arkansas in a couple months and going to help dad at his store. Guess that's all I have for now. Looking forward to helping and gaining knowledge from fellow horologists.
    5 points
  17. My JLC Heraion with caliber 889/1 needed a service. Having gained experience with several other (cheaper) watches I decided to try it myself. Being totally aware that I wouldn‘t get any spareparts if something might go wrong I was willing to let it serviced by JLC (about €800,-) if an accident should happen. Preparing my work I found a technical guide for the partially identical 928/2 at cousinsuk and a workthroug by the WatchGuy (AP Royal Oak with JLC 889/1). I designed a movement holder with a free CAD program and 3D printed it with my Ender 3. This holder supports the movement much better than my vice type holders. I didn‘t put me under time pressure in any way and just worked on the movement when I felt totally relaxed. A week later I had successfully disassembled the movement. Some screw hads unfortunately showed that I was not the first being inside this watch. The jewels of the fast reving wheels were totally dry and clean (!) showing that modern oils don‘t gum up but do eventually evaporate. I successfully cleaned the parts in pharmaceutical petroleum ether 40/60 and One Dip. The escape wheel and the pallet fork got epilamed. What happened to be the most challenging task was handling and oiling the super tiny capstones (0,9x0,12mm). One of them slipped out of my tweecers. My heart stood still for a moment. After hours of searching I gave up. I suspect the tiny particle landed on my clothes, skin or hair where it couldn‘t be seen. After some research I found that it is a standard KIF 508 which I could order with Boley. This time I was lucky For oiling the combined stones (fixed cap) of the escape wheel I found help in this forum. Meanwhile the watch is ticking healthy again and shows good results on the time grapher.
    5 points
  18. That will work. Another thing that's really important is to avoid stacking up errors. When I make a drawing, all lengths are referenced to one datum, which is logically the very end of the piece, whether a staff or stem (or whatever). All lengths come from that point; if I make a measuring error when cutting of 0.05mm on the first length, there's no reason that will translate to the next or further ones. I see a lot of drawings where each individual length is called out, and I imagine the person fighting to measure those, and stacking things up to an overall error that's huge. If you look at the pic (typical staff and stem sketches I make), all lengths are off the tip. For a staff, I then fill in the lengths off the lower part of the hub as datum, as I cut those with another tool in the slide rest- but they are derived from the original lengths, so any error introduced is in my visual centering of the second tool, which is a one time error. It's rare for me to be off more than 0.02mm overall on a staff length. You can also use the tail (rod) of a digital caliper the same as the Levin tool, but depending on your caliper you might not have a enough material in the body of the tool next to the rod to provide a stop for the end of the workpiece.
    5 points
  19. https://www.cousinsuk.com/product/component-probe-horotec-26009
    4 points
  20. My dad gave me this pocket watch, it was a gift to ware at my sisters wedding, I was 12 years old, I'm now 60. At some point I dropped it too many times and it stopped working, so it got stuffed into a drawer and forgotten...until now. I took it apart and found the escarpment wheel had a broken pivot. I was able to source a new escapement wheel and proceeded to clean and rebuild the watch. At one point I thought I had failed as the balance wheel would not rotate correctly, but I then found that I had installed the wrong screw into the pallet cock bridge and the balance was just barley rubbing on it, but enough to mess it up. Once I figured that out it started to run...and too my absolute joy, it works great now!!! Really a great and fun rebuild / fix, especially because it was a gift from my late dad.
    4 points
  21. So after my booboo and ordering the wrong size mainspring winder I thought I would pass the time being creative and not sat infront of TV waiting for the post man to deliver my goods. so I've been on my woodworking lathe making these pens
    4 points
  22. Just won this little Tissot expected next week some time
    4 points
  23. I never throw away anything. I'm a hoarder. I'll probably grind off the tips and reshape them. If the tips are too soft, I'll try hardening them. If that doesn't work, I'll still keep the metal in my scrap drawer. You never know when it may come in handy.
    4 points
  24. Just another Ellott to add to the other two I have. Got this for just under £50 which is a bargain considering one I have which is just a timepiece in a walnut case cost me over £200. Also all net proceeds will support Cats Protection, as you may or not know I love cats.
    4 points
  25. That's a full 360 rotation, but only 180 degrees amplitude, which is not that good at all. Balance wheel amplitude is the angle of rotation from the neutral point (where the wheel would be sitting if the balance was at rest with no power on) and either one of its extremes of rotation (the point where it reverses direction), so half the total rotation from one extreme to the other. If the amplitude was 360 then the balance would rotate a full 720 degrees from its extreme clockwise position to its extreme anticlockwise position, which as @nickelsilverpoints out, is impossible as the pallet fork would be in the way and hard up against the banking. You would get re-banking, with the impulse jewel crashing into the outside of the fork horns causing the balance wheel to rebound. Sounds like a galloping horse.
    4 points
  26. I no nothing about cars and I don't buy flat backed furniture.
    4 points
  27. Two old gents are sitting down to breakfast in the local cafe one morning. Bob looks over at his pal and sees something strange sticking out of his ear. "Hey Jim, did you know you have a suppository sticking out of your lug" he asks. Jim reaches up and removes the offending item. "Bob, I'm sure glad you spotted that, now I think I know where I must have put my hearing aid."
    4 points
  28. I saw an old watch bench pop up on FB marketplace and it was about 50 miles away, so this morning I was on a mission to get it. I did for $250!! It is not in great shape, but it will be an easy restore. Then I started opening the drawers. Wow. I am showing just some of the things I found. The two watches: one is an omega, and the other is an A-11 military watch. The name on the omega face is odd, but I opened the watch and it is an Omega movement. There are no chips on the poising tool!! I found WW collets (some rust but can be refurbished), a genuine Crocker sharpener. There must have been a lathe but it was not in the bench. I have asked the seller to look for it, so maybe there will be more to come!
    4 points
  29. After I got my Elgin 313 running today, I watched Stian restore an oil-drenched Soviet Pobeda Zim. I found one similar (in stainless or nickel plate) on eBay and it's on its way. The one shown is the one Stian worked on. Simple three-hand movement. First one I've purchased to work on actually in a case...
    4 points
  30. You would have a very hard time swapping in a hairspring from another 19,800 movement, so pretty much impossible to get a 21,600 to work. The springs are matched to the balance. In production the springs are colletted and studded at a specific length with the pinning points lined up for optimal timing, then their strength is measured and they are sorted into 20 groups. The balances are also sorted after poising into 20 groups, which correspond to the springs. They get mated up and off they go. If you look at a graph of the groups the majority are in the middle third, with fewer in the outer thirds; so there is a chance that if you get a spring from a balance that was originally in a close group, it might work. If you have a balance with screws you have much more adjustment to compensate for a mismatch. As this caliber has a solid balance with no screws, like I said, even with a 19,800 it will be a dice toss if it's even close.
    4 points
  31. Yes, sometimes the balance and all its components don't come perfectly clean even in a current standard cleaning machine with fresh high end solutions. Watches can get really manky. The smallest bit of contamination on a roller jewel or fork slot can rob 30, 50 degrees of amplitude. I regularly rub down these parts with freshly cut pegwood (clean razor) and see benefits. 1/2 century old oil, dried up, can be very tenacious. Peg jewels, pith pinions, it all helps. Best is to do this pre-cleaning machine, with benzine and a brush. Twirl a flat ended pegwood down on pivots. It all helps. And a microscope is the only way you really see it.
    4 points
  32. I thought I would remind everyone of something here? Just in case you're new to pocket watches. This watch uses lever setting so if you pull really hard on the crown thinking going to set the watch you're not. If you pull hard enough you're going to break something. In order to get the watch to go in the setting mode the lever which I circled in the picture attached has to be pulled out a little bit. I have a link below that shows the various setting methods and I think could've done a better job of describing things. The reason lever setting exists is it's the evolution of going from key set watches do something different. Later they understand how to make pendant setting watches. But in between we have lever setting. If it's a watch without a hunting case in other words it doesn't have a protective led the reference to removing the bezel means that you would just unscrew the bezel. In other words you wouldn't have to pry it off it would just unscrew the bezel with the crystal. Then more than likely the watch is not running because it hasn't been serviced in a very long time. The organic oils have a good characteristic of getting sticky hardening up and that keeps the watch from running which in reality is a good thing. It's good because that means you don't continue to run the watch forever with no oil at all wearing things out. Providing it hasn't been dropped breaking the balance staff or damaging it it probably just needs a cleaning and a new mainspring. then while the recommendation is to start with a pocket watch this is not the pocket watch to start on. First off it's a small size pocket watch. Second it's a vintage pocket watch that looks like it's a really nice condition. People often times brand-new to watch repair have a habit of well mysteriously things will happen in the watch might get damaged. Usually best to start on something inexpensive I usually recommend the Chinese clone of the 6497 it's a running watch if you taken apart and put it back together and it's not running well it does make it easier to figure out who's problem that is versus starting with a nonrunning pocket watch and just assuming it's the watch fault that it's still not running. Besides a watch like this the parts are going to be difficult to get. https://pocketwatchdatabase.com/reference/setting-types#Lever
    4 points
  33. After 3 hours and 20-some minutes, the shellac in isopropyl is almost completely dissolved. So yeah, absolutely it does dissolve shellac, just not near as fast.
    4 points
  34. The watch I was working on when I posted "Do Not Open, Bulova Sealed" is, once again, alive and well. (I still need a gasket for it) This one tested my patience and I needed to step away at multiple times. Both balance jewels and their clips needed to be dug out of their respective pockets. The hairspring needed to be slowly soaked and delaminated coil by coil. Once the oil was desolved, just about every part needed to be brushed to remove some hardend deposits of polomerized crud. An arduous two weeks of not knowing exactly when the expletives would start. At the end I should have stepped away at least one more time. I rushed installing the hands and put the minute hand on several minutes fast. I pulled the hands back off and slipped putting them on the second time, scratching the dial. The scratch (at 10:30) is small and unnoticeable with my naked eyes but is there and will haunt me every time I wear it. I hope this will help everyone myself including take your time and breathe.
    4 points
  35. Driving home from my College Station, we stopped in Lockhart--if you are not familiar with these places...you should be We stopped at Blacks BBQ and then to an antique store. I picked up this Waltham Crescent St 21J watch. Very nice. 10K gold filled case. All for a hundred bucks (not including the BBQ)!!
    4 points
  36. OK, that's understandable. If this watch is worth anything to you, my advice is to either take it to someone who knows what they are doing or put it aside until you have acquired the experience and confidence yourself.
    4 points
  37. Haha yes it's extremely accurate but only twice a day. My guess is the seller was just a little bit shy on the truth. Its kind of nice looking though in a dodgy non genuine wasted some money kind of way. Nice bit of shellac as well, I could french polish two mousemen sideboards with that.
    4 points
  38. Good information here for those of us just reading along, thanks. As a former mechanist, a trick Ive used many times for depth measurements is to use the top and back of my caliper, those surfaces are precisely machined and can be much easier than using the tail of the caliper.
    4 points
  39. I just asked a friend who does work for AP, he's not in the shop and can't remember exactly but around 3 minutes he said. He checks the forks anyway and puts new shellac if/as needed. With my old Greiner machine that distilled, the manual recommends 30 seconds for the balance and fork in freshly distilled (and very warm) alcohol, then the rest of the parts go in and get rinsed for 10-15 seconds in the same alco bath, the bath gets dumped, and once it refills after about 6 minutes, that's it. The only time I ever had an issue with shellac dissolving in the Greiner was if I left the fork in for quite some time. Depends on the age of the shellac too; a fork I had freshly re-shellacced would lose its shellac much more quickly than a lot of older ones, but really old forks might lose it as fast as freshly applied. One thing that simply hasn't been an issue over 25 years of doing this is pallet stones just falling out after the shellac is removed (intentionally or accidentally). In fact, if I really have to dig in to an escapement adjustment the first thing I do is remove all shellac, make my adjustments, including running the watch, then re-apply when I'm happy with it. I understand there are some forks out there that are loose on the stones, but I haven't seen one.
    4 points
  40. I quite like the look of that tool and may get one to modify. I’m still surprised at the number of people who are paranoid about deforming hairsprings by suspending the balance wheel by the spring. In my experience, there are few balances which are heavy enough to cause damage if you handle them carefully.
    4 points
  41. No that's not what the stud is for. You can cause timekeeping in position if you have an amplitude change but otherwise that's not normally What it's used for. The first link below has a little information on adjusting. Then I have a PDF that you may find interesting the manufacturing information sheet for this watch. Unlike the technical communication which covers how to service the watch this has all the interesting technical specifications including the timing specifications. Then depending upon which grade you have it looks like you are Definitely out of timing specifications Is there any amplitude change in those positions? If for some unknown reason you had a severe amplitude change that might be a reason. Because this is an older watch is possible that somebody has re-staff the watch and you have a poise error. Normally wouldn't have that screwless balance wheel if somebody put the Roller back in a different location that would give you a small poise error. Or if somebody tried the statically poise or even dynamically poise the balance wheel when it really didn't need that to happen that would also give you poise error. But otherwise you should be within the specifications of the information sheet unless there's something else going on? So when you're in the positions on your timing machine of where you're giving the timing problem are there any changes on the timing machine like is that amplitude would do this do the lines still looked nice and clean extra noise etc. otherwise it still keeps coming back to poise error which normally wouldn't exist on a screwless balance wheel unless somebody's played with it. https://www.awci.com/watchmaking-excellen/hairsprings/ http://www.ranfft.de/cgi-bin/bidfun-db.cgi?10&ranfft&0&2uswk&ETA_2671 ETA_2671_info.pdf
    4 points
  42. The ranfft site is incredibly useful but the balance staff (and stem) reference numbers are based on codes used by Flume Technik so not overly useful unless ordering parts from Germany via https://www.flume.de/ More universal for balance staff references are Ronda numbers and in this respect https://www.balancestaffs.com/ is a useful reference. This site tell us you need a 5053 balance staff. Clearly you could use this site to buy from but also with the Ronda number you can more likely find on a site like ebay. Also note that Cousins allows you to look up and order by Ronda number: https://www.cousinsuk.com/category/filter/ronda-staffs-by-ronda-number Note that anything involving the balance in some way is undoubtedly what fills most people's swear jars the quickest. Balance staff replacement is something valuable to learn ... but not straight away on something (sentimentally) valuable. I'd therefore certainly recommend practicing on something else first.
    4 points
  43. New Noob Daytona V4 with 4130 movement it didn’t come from watch time it’s the only pic I found. also a Franck Muller Vanguard yachting anchor skeleton. Gotta change the band on that one. I Think blue leather with white stitch. They Should be here in a couple weeks
    4 points
  44. Thank you Kalanag, and to all. Done it. Been trying for days. Ping, ping, ping. Search for the spring. Tried it again today. A small piece of Rodico on the spring stuck to the tweezers when I removed the spring from the Rodico. Used that as the holder, placed it against the gap. Closed my eyes and took a breath. Now I'll push it in. What? Don't need to, as it is already in. Gently push each side of the spring into place. Done!!! Cleaned the base again. Tomorrow I will try to put the gems back in. Woohoo! Ross
    3 points
  45. I believe its a K & D. Very few piece show excessive wear. OCD level 3 and still not finished:
    3 points
  46. As others have said, given that this if genuine would be on a 10 grand plus watch I would expect perfection, the lume pips are all over the place in both size and position, they just look like they have been done by hand, the Rolex pips would be added mechanically so would all be even in size and position relating to the hour markers. One common ply I have seen is someone has a bag of old junkers and throws in a fake Rolex, but never mentions it in the description so some poor fool thinks the seller has missed it so bids accordingly, the trouble is poor fools rearly act alone and they seem to congregate around the same auctions thus push the price of the bag of junk up to silly levels, which encourages the seller to do it again. Seen it happen in the Pen world as well, in one case 10 Chines pens which cost a couple of pounds each are bundled with a fake Montblanc and the description says I know nothing about these pens, I found them when clearing a dead relatives house. They then sit back and watch £20 worth of low quality pens sell for a couple of hundred to one of the affor mentioned poor fools.
    3 points
  47. Hiya Rich . There are a lot of fake watches on ebay. I found a tag dial that was really badly done. Examine very closely. Any thing that doesn't indicate quality then it's a fake. The lettering does look a little off level and a bit pants . The calender 13 doesn't look quality at all, and look a the lume pip at 9. And the indices at 6 the lume pip is covering the Swiss lettering. These standout to my untrained eye. This would be from what a ten grand watch? I would expect much more for my money tbh. I nearly bought myself a Tudor this weekend that was reduced to 2 grand, it looked near perfect. Sorry mate there are loads of them. Its a trick that the seller uses, discreetly hiding something that looks valuable to bump up the bidding. Crafty barstuards
    3 points
  48. Looks like the bezel should come off, then the movement goes out the front.
    3 points
  49. Here is a clock that belonged to my great Aunt who likely bought it in France in the latte 19th century when she lived over there. It has been displayed in my home for a long time and now I am servicing it. The clock was serviced four previous times by a person who also did clock work for my Dad's business. He was a machinist and quite skillful, but I am somewhat disappointed by the work I see here. Moreover, he marked it serviced four times over an eleven year period. That seems excessive to me. So, it is a bit of a mystery. Anyway, I am showing pictures of the tear down here. I have cleaned it, and it is reassembled and running--in test phase. I will post other pictures later. Because of the warnings I received here, I did not use ammoniated cleaner. Instead, I used Dawn soap in water in an ultrasonic, and then rinsed in alcohol (not the drinkable kind!). Not so pretty of a result, so I did use Brasso on the back plate...the one that will be visible. Then I did another clean in the ultrasonic with an alcohol bath. The regulator on the ones I have seen has a spring detent on the regulator sprocket. It was not present on this clock. A fella gave me a box of French clock movements like this, so I pinched the detent from one of those. It looks factory now...and works properly.
    3 points
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