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nickelsilver

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nickelsilver last won the day on January 15

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About nickelsilver

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    Switzerland

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  1. nickelsilver

    Star Lathe 61626, worth it?

    I don't recall what's in there but DeCarle is normally a good source of info. Jendritzky's book is pretty good, I haven't seen it yet but Archie Perkins is a sort of lathe guru so I'd recommend his book without hesitation. I haven't seen any youtube videos that show actual good technique, most are pretty hackish. AWCI has some good videos from Ron DeCorte.
  2. nickelsilver

    Star Lathe 61626, worth it?

    If it somehow rusted inside the spindle to bearing area, where there is almost 99.99% chance of there being at least oil residue, while remaining pristine looking everywhere else, that'd be odd. But the contact area of these bearings is so massive relative to the actual size of the machine I'd be surprized that just cleaning off the rust wouldn't get it back in service true as can be.
  3. nickelsilver

    Star Lathe 61626, worth it?

    Yes looks like a vice jaw. I'll point out that this type of lathe is very easily adjustable for play in the bearings. So if after running it with a fine oil you find its a little sloppy don't worry.
  4. nickelsilver

    Star Lathe 61626, worth it?

    These lathes use double tapered hardened steel sleeve bearings that interact directly with corresponding tapers on the spindle. They're theoretically replaceable but practically next to impossible. They can be re-lapped to a certain degree if necessary. They are incredibly tough and long-lived, and require very excessive abuse over a long time to become noticeably worn. That lathe looks great, great price, and older is better overall when it comes to this type of machine.
  5. nickelsilver

    What Could Be Causing Low Amplitude

    From what I can see the drop lock is to much, you'll want to push the stones in the fork a little bit. Use the gap at the end of the slot as a visual guide, reduce it by perhaps a third, then check drop lock again and ensure that you still have safe lock with the horn touching the guard pin (both sides).
  6. nickelsilver

    What Could Be Causing Low Amplitude

    I'll just point out that eccentric bankings are a good thing, they make life much easier. Geneva Seal watches with solid bankings as part of the mainplate, numerous modern pieces with the bankings as a solid part of the pallet bridge- these make adjustments very difficult. Pressed in banking pins have to be bent in a way the functional part remains perpendicular to the plate. A pain. Anytime I've had input on a development project I recommend eccentrics.
  7. nickelsilver

    What Could Be Causing Low Amplitude

    Lawren5 can you manage a video focused on the interaction of the pallet stones and escape wheel while slowly rotating the balance?
  8. nickelsilver

    What Could Be Causing Low Amplitude

    Ideally you do these checks looking straight down at the movement under a microscope. You won't see the horns or guard pin interacting with the roller, use an oiler to move fork and feel when it makes contact and observe the pallet stones.
  9. nickelsilver

    What Could Be Causing Low Amplitude

    That's a tremendous amount of total lock on both stones. Easily the cause of 100 degrees of missing amplitude. To find out whether to move the stones or bankings or both depends on the drop lock. A shortcut to get you in the ballpark is to check fork horn safety; with the roller jewel just out of the fork slot bring the horn in contact with it. Check the lock. In a good escapement the lock should be very very small here, almost nothing. If it is excessive, in theory you can move the stone in until it is just a tiny amount. If the horn safety is already very small, it's a clear sign that the bankings have been moved.
  10. nickelsilver

    ETA2824 setting issue

    Either of those oils would be fine, for the pinion to wheel junction and for the post it sits on. ETA calls for a heavier grease between pinion and wheel but my experience is HP1300 works great.
  11. nickelsilver

    ETA2824 setting issue

    Did you lubricate the junction between the pinion and the wheel?
  12. nickelsilver

    ETA2824 setting issue

    You have the balance out yes? When you are turning backwards it's causing the escape wheel to run backwards, this is what's letting the large wheel move. It should remain stationary while the pinion slips.
  13. nickelsilver

    What Could Be Causing Low Amplitude

    Sideshake and endshake are not the same, endshake is axial play, and sideshake is radial play. Excessive sideshake wouldn't allow the pivot to come out of the jewel, and in my view the sideshake apparent in the video is acceptable.
  14. nickelsilver

    What Could Be Causing Low Amplitude

    Well, a few posts back I was referring to the fact that a lot of American pieces have the escapement in tatters because the thing that gets adjusted (mis-adjusted) straight away is the banking pins. It would be worth seeking out Fried's book on the lever escapement, and I think his main book the Watch Repairer's Manual also gets into adjusting. In a nutshell: with power on the watch, balance in, stop the balance and rotate it by hand slowly just until and escape tooth falls on a pallet stone. Observe the amount of lock right at this moment, this is drop lock. Go the other way, the locks should be equal or near it and definitely not more than about 1/5-1/4 the width of the stone. Do it again, and at the moment of lock, move the fork toward the balance and check that the escapement doesn't unlock, then continue rotating the balance and continue checking. You're checking that the fork horns are supplying safety and as you continue to rotate that the guard pin is providing safety. When all that checks out you can look at total lock. If you have an abundance of lock still when the horns are against the roller jewel and guard pin against the roller table, you can pull the pallet stones in a little bit. Go through the checks again. Total lock is drop lock (what you saw above) plus the run to the banking, which is what the fork does after drop lock. There must be some run to the banking. Drop lock must be safe. Now you can get to your banking pins. If the total lock is more than about 1/3 the width of the stone, you can close the banking a bit. Check that you still have run to the banking, and that there is freedom between the fork horns and roller jewel and the guard pin and roller table at all times. Keep in mind that moving a stone affects the other. If you move the entrance stone into the fork, you will reduce drop lock on that stone, and on the exit stone. Total lock will be reduced on the entrance and be unchanged on the exit. Pulling the stone out will increase drop lock on both stones, total lock on the entrance, and total still remains the same on exit. And vice-versa if moving the exit stone.
  15. nickelsilver

    What Could Be Causing Low Amplitude

    Traditionally American companies would use flat ends on their balance pivots. This tends to equalize the horoizontal and vertical amplitudes. It was a cause of some serious rebanking when watches were restaffed with Swiss made replacements, as they had the more typical rounded ends. As for checking the escapement, it's fairly involved, have you read up on it at all or completely new?
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