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MrRoundel

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MrRoundel last won the day on February 15 2019

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  1. Sounds a lot like what Amazon itself does. But of course rather than being labeled a scam it is a "business model". However, I must admit that when Amazon does it that you at least get the item. Truth be told, I am no fan of Amazon. We live in an age where it's becoming possible to be too good at what you do. That is Amazon, IMHO. A bloated but highly efficient behemoth. In this world it pays to be extra cautious, as there's a scam born every nanosecond. Eventually these crooks get a few "blind trusters" who pay to make it worth their while. I'm glad you caught it.
  2. It's a very nice movement. I recently helped a friend acquire a V&C that was a different caliber (1002), and was about the same size. I believe it was here on this MB that somebody mentioned that the C1003 like yours has a rather tricky barrel design. I believe they called it a "suspended barrel". So if you don't need to replace the mainspring, I wouldn't mess with it. . V&C does make beautiful, and very high quality, movements. Good luck with it. Cheers.
  3. Another Platax on the bay, FYI. Not cheap, but I think I've seen them go for more. I don't know the seller. Cheers. Platax
  4. I ended up buying a Meylan stopwatch that has a broken staff. It was under $10 shipped and taxed so I figured it was worth the lessons it held within. It has a broken staff. This probably happened whenever these things were banged around, as the solid balance is pretty beefy. I decided to remove the staff just to see what it was like. It is a rather conventional friction-fit design so it was pretty easy to punch it out. I may even make a staff for it someday soon. Being that has a minimum number of critical dimensions, it should be relatively easy to make. The balance shoulder and hairspr
  5. I found an identical Minerva stopwatch on the bay. After replacing the broken spring under the dial it came time to figure out the setting of the hands. It was a bit tricky trying to get things to line up as I lowered the dial/cams over their respective posts. I ended up Scotch-taping the hands at the 12:00 position while I maneuvered the dial into place. Believe it or not, it worked. The dial screws were the cam style. It took some force to engage, but ended up grabbing. While it seems there is little interest in stopwatches, I find them rather interesting. They're probably used as much
  6. Since I am not doing repairs for compensation, unless the MS is broken or slipping I don't replace it. Sometimes I pop the cover and put a couple of dabs of clock oil on the coils. And there are times when I look at the design of the watch to see how difficult it is to remove the barrel, i.e. number of parts to remove to get there, before I make any decisions. The easiest designs have it so you can just remove the winding wheel (screwed to barrel arbor) and the barrel bridge with crown wheel and click intact. But when I am going to be replacing the MS I always draw a diagram to show which w
  7. After getting the go-ahead (with indemnification) to use a bit more force from the stopwatch's owner, I pried a bit more aggressively. The dial did come off with the hands still attached to their lower cam pieces. It turns out there is a broken coil spring under the dial. That's what we figured based on the action, or lack thereof, of the main button (Crown). I'll probably have to buy a parts watch to get one. The next tricky part will be in re-setting the dial/hand unit. Surely the cams must be set just right relative to the return to zero position. Hopefully I'll figure that one out. Ch
  8. FWIW, and realizing this is an older thread, I too have issues with my L&R cleaners leaving residue on parts after cleaning. Sometimes it seems like they went in cleaner than they came out. And even if the cleaner left something on the parts I'd expect that the rinse would cut through whatever it was and rinse it off, but it did not. Once the cleaner has sat in the jars for a week or more, it leaves a sticky brown substance on the jar and the metal parts within. This can be after only cleaning one movement. I often end up emptying the solutions and cleaning this residue with denatured
  9. Sorry for the double post. I inadvertently posted in the wrong forum. I hope the moderator(s) can delete it. Greetings, folks. I know it's a shot in the dark but does anyone have experience to provide pointers on removing the dial on a Minerva stopwatch? There's an absolute dearth of information on the internet. That surprises me. I have read that they are a bit tricky, but my friend wanted me to look at it to see if it can fixed economically. It's actually a fairly standard looking 3/4 plate watch. The plunger that is actuated by the crown is not operating. It's as if something eit
  10. I usually look at what would be the escape wheel bridge to see if it's below the plane of the other bridges, and under the balance. When it is, it says "cylinder" to me. LeCoultre made them. I believe even Patek and Vacheron made them, so the escapement wasn't terrible, especially on the three mentioned. Virtually any watch repair manual from "the day" will have information on cylinders. Lots of info around the WWW. Cheers back at'cha.
  11. Greetings, folks. I know it's a shot in the dark but does anyone have experience to provide pointers on removing the dial on a Minerva stopwatch? There's an absolute dearth of information on the internet. That surprises me. I have read that they are a bit tricky, but my friend wanted me to look at it to see if it can fixed economically. It's actually a fairly standard looking 3/4 plate watch. The plunger that is actuated by the crown is not operating. It's as if something either broke or slipped behind the dial. Unfortunately, the dial isn't an easy one. This is mostly due to the hands be
  12. I'm pretty sure it's a legitimate LeCoultre. That was a common bridge design they used on their cylinder movements. Be advised that cylinder escapement are rarely highly sought after, and not every watchmaker works on them. Their escapement isn't complicated, but it's different to work on. And it is not considered as accurate as lever escapements. I don't think I'd chase that one, especially if it's not running. Good luck.
  13. Be super careful with that one. I'm guessing it's 18k gold, so any slippage of opening tools will leave their mark. And once you get in there, that dial looks special, so I wouldn't want to mar it using tools that don't afford the proper protection. Dang hands can be tricky. In the image the hands don't look terribly misaligned. In fact, it has them in the classic sales pose of 10:10. I'm guessing those are the sales images? That said, if you've seen them in their straight up hour positions, you know if they are misaligned. Good luck.
  14. If you have the Chicago Watchmaking School set, video or hard copy, you might find your answer on page 5 of chapter 5. There they show an Elgin 18s full-plate watch that has the click accessed through the side of the watch. I'd be looking there. If you think you've found it, give your let-down key a clockwise twist and watch for the movement of the click. A piece of small pegwood might get in there to let it down. If not, use whatever fits. Just make sure you have a good hold on the let-down key before committing. Good luck.
  15. Yes, those Esembl-O-Graf booklets/DVD, etc. would be very handy indeed. I remember seeing them being sold at NAWCC marts. But since I was only interested in pocket watches at the time, I never snagged any. I do remember a friend buying a bunch of them. Good thought. I had forgotten about them.
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