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Pango

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  1. Screwdrivers, tweezers, movement holders, and loupes. That is the core of your toolset. Contrary to popular opinion you don't need to spend much on screwdrivers and tweezers. They can be brought up to scratch with a decent set of stones/diamond laps, and a bit of practice. In fact bringing them up to scratch is a core skill for watchmakers/repairers. The sooner you learn how to do that, the better. So spend some money on decent stones/laps. Optical magnification and movement holders, however, need to be good from the start. You can't fix substandard versions. Spend the money on some decent stuff up front. Though that doesn't need to be a lot.
  2. As far as I know Sekonda is just a rebranded Molnija. Identical except for the dial face and case decoration. There are a handful of these rebrands for local markets. From my links file, some possible sources for info on the Molnija balance staffs (no guarantees, and some are not in English). I'd start with the first one: http://tuxgraphics.org/~guido/molnija-pocket-watch/ https://watch-wiki.org/index.php?title=Werkfamilie_Molnia http://forums.watchuseek.com/f10/ http://forums.watchuseek.com/f10/different-variants-molnija-3602-movement-390461.html http://www.russianwatchguide.com/101.htm https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B5bVOHCkvZ-PMEhjc0RCZ2dlNFU/view http://forum.watch.ru
  3. It's original French name is 'Mesure et démesure', and is on YT but with no soundtrack. Also on Vimeo, with a soundtrack, and is better quality than Ishima's copy.
  4. Still have not done any real work yet, but have been practicing picking up parts and dressing tweezers, etc. One thing I did discover early on is that your hand size can make a difference to which tweezers work best. I have large palms that just swallow up many tweezer sizes, so the longer ones work better for me, at least for general work. AA and SS, for example. For finer work like hairsprings you just have to manage with what is available. I find that the SS tips can cross a bit easily compared to the more robust AA. Might just need more practice. But I did slim my AA tips down a little finer and that seems a good compromise. Also slimmed the shoulders of the AA, more like the 3, so I can more easily roll the tweezers in my hand.
  5. Can you put these excellent videos on your Youtube channel? I would like to be able to download them to watch offline. Thanks.
  6. For this complete novice the important things I learned from watching the videos are to be patient and methodical, tweezer skills matter, and watch the videos again. Learned as much the second time around as I did the first. (Though that is coming off a minimal knowledge base.) Mark's videos are a nice mix of educational and relaxing.
  7. G'day North Australian here. Came here via Mark's excellent videos on YouTube. Watched them all at least once. Looking forward to some more done with his new camera. Not in the business, or a serious hobby guy. But do like mechanical watches, and learning about them and horology in general. Watched a lot of videos online, and read quite a bit of stuff on various forums and sites. Got a few different books, practical and historical. Currently about a third of the way through Revolution in Time, by Landers, which I really like. Gives a solid historical picture of the whole show. Have a couple of basic mechanical watches. A Seagull ST-36 in a stainless case with display back, and a Molinja 3602 pocket watch. Already cased a couple of watches, trimmed a new stem, etc, but would like to get to the level where I can do a basic clean and lube on them every so often. Apart from the oils and one or two basic watch tools, I already have most of the gear needed, plus basic workshop skills with small fiddly stuff from some time at the electronics bench many years ago. Also looking a bit longer term at putting together a nice vintage pocket watch for my father. So slowly learning some of the more practical issues, like what movements go with what dials, which brands and movements have more spare parts, etc. Mostly I will just be lurking and reading, and maybe asking the occasional question.
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