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I tried a lot of of different tweezers as I pinged parts much too often. This was before I fully realized the importance of holding the parts as gently as you can without dropping them. 

After trying steel, titanium and brass I came across bronze tweezers from Boley and I have never looked back. Bronze is so soft and nice with a great feel. Just perfect for me for most anything apart from hairspring adjustment where it's Dumont #5. 

Stian 

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I have had many brands of Tweezers over the years and always keep coming back to Dumont.   Size 5 or 4 for hairspring work. Size 2 For general work.   I personally have no use for any other size

I've been using the Dumoxel #2 and #5 mainly (I lean towards #5 mostly) but I've seen Mark's tweezers in the videos and they look mighty good and strong....Since my #2's are a little battered I was wo

If you're handling delicate steel parts, brass tweezers are safer because they're softer than steel and won't mark the components.

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This is an interesting and "Helpful" thread and I thank you as I am shopping for tools. From this thread I have gathered that I should get Dumont #2 and #5 in brass. For S.S. I could go then with #3 and another #5. Advice would be greatly appreciated as well.

I too am amazed at Mark's video's and how steady his hands are, his knowledge and techniques, awestruck best clarify's this.

I have been doing some practice on junk watches, and finding that other than my unsteady hands, I have issues with tweezers and parts "popping" out and sailing away. The tweezers I am using are not the best and have not been shaped yet for watch work.  I also am wondering if I am squeezing too hard on them. I have made a small bench to work with, making it so that I would have good posture from the height and plenty of light. Probably my Irish luck so all suggestions and thoughts on the things that make a good technique will be very much appreciated.

Limited budget so I am keeping this to 4 tweezers to start with.

Have a wonderful day folks and blessings

 

Tim

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I am using vetus tweezers but I haven't interrogated their quality at all...  Probably they're fake because i paid for them only $1 dollar... I don't know if it is necessary to get high quality tweezers....  Buy my budget is very limited... 

By the way i always make propaganda for cheap Chinese products on the forum. I am aware of that but it is not easy to live in a third world country, especially if you have lost your job... Everything is problem in such countries, you know... I need for your understanding...  Sorry for that... 

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Few more question about Dumont tweezers before placing order.
 
1- While researching I read people preferring Dumont “brass” for certain tasks due to metal’s softness. For none-brass tweezers, should one choose DumonXel RC36 or harder DumoStar RC62 ?
 
2- Also, would one use “matte” rather than “polished” tweezers due to potential light reflexion or is it just a personal preference?
 
Lastly tweezers #3 & #5 have 2 different size specs.
 
Dumont #3 - straight tweezers sizes specs: 0.1/0.17mm vs 0.04/0.08mm
 
Dumont #5 - straight tweezers sizes specs : 0.06/0.1mm vs 0.01/0.05mm
 
3- Which specs for #3 and #5 are more adequate for watch repair ?
 
For information sharing, you will find Dumont straight tweezers specs sheet below:
 
 
Thank you,
AJ
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Are the recommendation for pocket watch tweezers different than for wrist watches.

So for arguments sake settle on no. 2 and 5 for wrist watches, what is the recommendation for pocket watches?

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17 hours ago, Kobus said:

Are the recommendation for pocket watch tweezers different than for wrist watches.

So for arguments sake settle on no. 2 and 5 for wrist watches, what is the recommendation for pocket watches?

Get brass tweezers, cheap but great for general handling, won't scratch parts, are easy to shape and dress as needed.
I now use steel /specialized tweezers only when necessary.

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2 hours ago, Kobus said:

Are the recommendation for pocket watch tweezers different than for wrist watches.

So for arguments sake settle on no. 2 and 5 for wrist watches, what is the recommendation for pocket watches?

I use the same size tweezers for handling wristwatch and pocket watch parts; 1AM brass. No.2 steel are also good for handling almost anything, as long as you are gentle. No.5 steel for tweaking hairsprings etc. but not for picking things up.

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It boils down to personal preference.

If you have a light enough touch then No.5 and No.4 are fine for picking things up, but with a greater risk of things flying if you get a little heavier handed as the tips are more prone to flex. Also your No.5's won't last long if you do too much heavy lifting with them.

My go to tweezers are old carbon steel No.4's, some of which started life as No.5's but have been dressed so often that they are now effectively No.4's. I use these for handling screws, springs, and handling wheels by their steel pinions. For installing wire springs I use the same No.4's sometimes with a little assistance from some carbon steel No.2's. For handling plates, bridges, cocks, cut springs, and wheels where I'm handling the wheel rather than the pinion, I use brass No.3's. I also make extensive use of a couple of shaped brass rods of different diameters, and peg wood for handling and maneuvering parts. I haven't tried the acrylic swizzel sticks yet but I believe that they are very good.

The same set of tools does for everything from ladies wrist watch calibers through gents wrist and pocket watches up to desk clocks, and only gets bigger in scale if I need to use pliers.

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I would always recommend buying some old high quality tweezers instead of new ones of less quality. Tweezers are extension of your hands, and this is job done with hands.

Just keep attention that the tweezers are in fair condition, I bought used Dumont 2, 3, 4 and 5 as a pack and got them cheaper. For the beginning, 3 and 5 should do the job pretty well though.

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I've had good luck with Viola tweezers made in Italy.  Quality and finish matches Swiss.  Some brass models.  Priced around $10 a pair new on flea bay.  Think you'll be pleasantly surprised by price and quality.

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On 3/2/2021 at 4:01 PM, StickDog said:

I've had good luck with Viola tweezers made in Italy.  Quality and finish matches Swiss.  Some brass models.  Priced around $10 a pair new on flea bay.  Think you'll be pleasantly surprised by price and quality.

Indeed. Wonder if they're still in business? Got mine from a material house on the days they were closing down.

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Number 5 is very fine and delicate. I wouldn't bother with standard stainless steel as it's too soft for this pattern in my opinion.

 

If you are going to do work on quartz watches then I'd get the Dumostar. If you are doing work on mechanical watches and don't require antimagnetism then I'd find a set of "original" carbon steel types as it is the hardest. I use both types.

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