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Question: the manual calls for Moebius A and Seiko watch oil S-6.  It does not call for any grease.  In most of the posts I see recommendations for Moebius 9010, Moebius D5, etc...  Can someone give me recommended equivalents that I'm likely to find in these local shops for both the Moebius A and the S-6?

 

For your lubrication question you have a minor terminology problem that comes up quite a bit. Moebius Lubricants sometimes go by other names such as SYNT-A-LUBE which gets shortened to Moebius A Which is really 9010. Then as you're looking for S-6 I assume you're looking at a Seiko sheet and that's their general-purpose grease.

 

John

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I's sure this has been covered somewhere. However, I have a couple of automatic wrist watches Eloga movements that need cleaning and lubricating. I have M 8200 for mainsprings do I need/have to purchase the 8201 for these automatic movements?

 

Any thoughts are welcome!

 

Thanks!

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Well I would definitely start with Moebius 9010 (for train wheels and balance endstones) and 9020 (for train wheels) if you are working on Pocket Watches.

Moebius 9415 is a must for Pallet/Escape wheel teeth.

A quality silicon grease.

Moebius D5 is essential (barrel arbor, motion work).

Molycote DX or Moebius 9501 grease for keyless work.

Moebius 9501 or 9504 for high friction (e.g. Cannon pinion, Setting lever spring and anything at high friction).

Moebius 8200 grease for mainspring.

It's a lot but at a minimum get 9010, 9415, D5 and 8200

I hope this helps.

I've ordered 9010, 9415, D5 and 8200 from cousins, but I'm focussing on pocket watches at the moment - will the above combination still be valid ?

Cheers - Dean

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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Well I would definitely start with Moebius 9010 (for train wheels and balance endstones) and 9020 (for train wheels) if you are working on Pocket Watches.

Moebius 9415 is a must for Pallet/Escape wheel teeth.

A quality silicon grease.

Moebius D5 is essential (barrel arbor, motion work).

Molycote DX or Moebius 9501 grease for keyless work.

Moebius 9501 or 9504 for high friction (e.g. Cannon pinion, Setting lever spring and anything at high friction).

Moebius 8200 grease for mainspring.

 

It's a lot but at a minimum get 9010, 9415, D5 and 8200

 

I hope this helps.

Hi Mark. I am watching your video on servicing a Venus 175. Would you recommend me using HP 1300 instead of 9501? I also have kt22 that I use on the keyless works whenever I service an old (40-50s) Hamilton wristwatch.

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Anybody have a suggestion for what to use on non-jeweled pocket watch train pivots?

Hi urgur,

Although I don't really have a suggestion I can tell you this, being a pocket watch and given the different sizes of them and usually of a bigger nature (not always), the size sometimes dictates what type of oil to use. Moebius has a table for this and it is somewhere in the forum but also searchable online. I hope this helps.

Cheers,

Bob

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As a general rule;

Barrel: D5

Centre wheel: D5

3rd & 4th wheels: 9020

Escape wheel: 9010

Mark, could you have a look at my question a couple of posts ago? I'm looking for a substitute for 9501 when servicing a chronograph. I have HP 1300, Molykote dx and kt22.

Thanks!

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36 minutes ago, B3stia said:

Mark, could you have a look at my question a couple of posts ago? I'm looking for a substitute for 9501 when servicing a chronograph. I have HP 1300, Molykote dx and kt22.

Thanks!

9501 is a high friction grease and it is best practice to use this for at least the canon pinion and the setting lever/setting lever spring. You can substitute the expensive 9501 with Molycote DX which is very cheap to buy.

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Roger, you can also use some mixture of 9010 and something else...(I've seen this somewhere), you let evaporate and voila! Cheaper and probably a good substitute.

Cheers,

Bob

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you can dilute 9010 with naphtha.

 

you can also buy v106 and v106 from the french oil lady on ebay - smaller quantities for us hobbyists and it might even be cheaper in the long run than diluting 9010.  plus it's another bottle on the shelf/in the drawer to admire.

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9 hours ago, bobm12 said:

Roger, you can also use some mixture of 9010 and something else...(I've seen this somewhere), you let evaporate and voila! Cheaper and probably a good substitute.

Cheers,

Bob

That is what i am doing now: Just serviced a Seiko 8305 and was reading on watchbloke .http://thewatchbloke.co.uk/2015/09/12/seiko-8306-8020/#more-3799  he had trouble with the lubrication of the reverse wheel in the Seiko. So there it's better to use the 9010 . I am more thinking of the ETA movements. 

And o my god there are so many parts in the Seiko 8305 :) 

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