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Thanks everyone. The watches that I'm currently working on are a Hamilton 917 and a Waltham Os trench watch. Like Bob said I'll have to save up for the 9145, as I just bought the D5 and Molykote DX. Sounds like I'll be ok for now with the 9010 on the pallet jewels for those, but 9145 will be the next purchase.

Also thanks for the clarification on the chart.

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Thanks everyone. The watches that I'm currently working on are a Hamilton 917 and a Waltham Os trench watch. Like Bob said I'll have to save up for the 9145, as I just bought the D5 and Molykote DX. Sounds like I'll be ok for now with the 9010 on the pallet jewels for those, but 9145 will be the next purchase.

Also thanks for the clarification on the chart.

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I just sprung for some 9145 and now I have all the oil I will ever need; I think.

9010, 9415, 8013, 9104 (HP 1300), D5, KT22. About 250 bucks in oil. Hell, I'm in the oil business I guess

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After reading this, I may have chosen the wrong oils.  I use 8000 for the Escape Wheel, Balance, Gear train and pallet fork pivots.  I use 914 on the pallet jewels and 8030 on the winding mech and spring.  For the center wheel, I use D5.  Should I be using 9010 instead of the 8000?  Crap, I'm the idiot that bought three jars of it too.... :cold:  The movements I work on are always vintage and are typically low beat.

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Jeff,

8000 is fine, just don't oil the pallet pivots on movements below 12 ligne. Above 9 ligne you should use your D5 for the train wheels not 8000. See the table in the first post for confirmation of this.

941 came out after the table was produced, but was made for pallet jewels.

8030 is clock oil, do you mean 8300 for the winding mech and spring?

S

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Jeff,

8000 is fine, just don't oil the pallet pivots on movements below 12 ligne. Above 9 ligne you should use your D5 for the train wheels not 8000. See the table in the first post for confirmation of this.

941 came out after the table was produced, but was made for pallet jewels.

8030 is clock oil, do you mean 8300 for the winding mech and spring?

S

 

Thanks VERY much for that advice my friend, I've been using 8000 on train wheels until now;)  Thanks again for the quick response!

 

Darn typo, yes, I meant 8300 for the mech and mainspring.  Should I be using 8200 or is 8300 acceptable?

 

EDIT:  If anyone is interested in 8000, I have PLENTY;)

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  • 2 weeks later...

If anyone is interested in 8000, I have PLENTY;)

I might be interested in the 8000.  How much are you willing to let it go for?   I read somewhere that, if you were only going to use one oil for all pivots, 8000 was the way to go.  Amy truth to that?  Also, 8000 is a natural oil.  Should I be switching to a synthetic instead?  Total newbie here.

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I might be interested in the 8000.  How much are you willing to let it go for?   I read somewhere that, if you were only going to use one oil for all pivots, 8000 was the way to go.  Amy truth to that?  Also, 8000 is a natural oil.  Should I be switching to a synthetic instead?  Total newbie here.

 

Welcome!!!  I prefer the natural oil.  I'll look up what I paid for the 3 and divide it:)

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I paid just under 7 US dollars per vial.  I have no idea what this stuff would even cost to ship but wouldn't think It would be much...

I truly do appreciate the offer, but with shipping, that would be what I'm already paying, so I will have to pass on the oil.  But thanks for the offer, and for the advice.

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Well I would definitely start with Moebius 9010 (for train wheels and balance endstones) and 9020 (for train wheels) if you are working on Pocket Watches.

Moebius 9415 is a must for Pallet/Escape wheel teeth.

A quality silicon grease.

Moebius D5 is essential (barrel arbor, motion work).

Molycote DX or Moebius 9501 grease for keyless work.

Moebius 9501 or 9504 for high friction (e.g. Cannon pinion, Setting lever spring and anything at high friction).

Moebius 8200 grease for mainspring.

 

It's a lot but at a minimum get 9010, 9415, D5 and 8200

 

I hope this helps.

Hi Mark. I am watching your video on servicing a Venus 175. Would you recommend me using HP 1300 instead of 9501? I also have kt22 that I use on the keyless works whenever I service an old (40-50s) Hamilton wristwatch.

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Quote

Anybody have a suggestion for what to use on non-jeweled pocket watch train pivots?

Hi urgur,

Although I don't really have a suggestion I can tell you this, being a pocket watch and given the different sizes of them and usually of a bigger nature (not always), the size sometimes dictates what type of oil to use. Moebius has a table for this and it is somewhere in the forum but also searchable online. I hope this helps.

Cheers,

Bob

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Anybody have a suggestion for what to use on non-jeweled pocket watch train pivots? Still 9020? Or is something heavier desirable due to metal on metal contact?

As a general rule;

Barrel: D5

Centre wheel: D5

3rd & 4th wheels: 9020

Escape wheel: 9010

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As a general rule;

Barrel: D5

Centre wheel: D5

3rd & 4th wheels: 9020

Escape wheel: 9010

Mark, could you have a look at my question a couple of posts ago? I'm looking for a substitute for 9501 when servicing a chronograph. I have HP 1300, Molykote dx and kt22.

Thanks!

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36 minutes ago, B3stia said:

Mark, could you have a look at my question a couple of posts ago? I'm looking for a substitute for 9501 when servicing a chronograph. I have HP 1300, Molykote dx and kt22.

Thanks!

9501 is a high friction grease and it is best practice to use this for at least the canon pinion and the setting lever/setting lever spring. You can substitute the expensive 9501 with Molycote DX which is very cheap to buy.

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