Jump to content

Lubricants


Recommended Posts

  • 3 weeks later...

 

On 17/9/2014 at 3:46 PM, Mark said:

I use HP 1300 (instead of D5) on higher grade movements such as 2892 and the Dubois Depraz modules, as well as HP 500 in place of 9010 (except on balance end stones where I still use 9010).

 

Your list looks good.

 

I did a small list in this topic also. http://www.watchirepairtalk.com/topic/83-lubricants/#entry310

I took note of that list you shared, I will see which can I take to try my very first service, I´m making a list of materials and basic tools to perform thee task. Thank you all for your posts!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Hello all,

I'm about to service a Timex 260 electric movement.  It's running strong as-is, but I doubt that it has been cleaned or lubricated in its lifetime.  I do have the service manual for the movement and for most of the oil points, the SM calls for Moebius Synt-A-Lube, without specifying a product number (I intend to use Moebius 9010), but for the friction pinion the manual calls for "spreading type oil" (Woods AAAA oil).  I cannot find a cross-reference for this old Woods oil and most watch oils are, of course, specifically formulated to NOT spread...  so, I'm seeking advice and suggestions for a suitable oil to use on the friction pinion.  Also, if anyone thinks that 9010 is NOT appropriate to use for the various other points, please let me know.

Thanks much!

Ben

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you for your suggestion, rogart63.  You may be correct about the Epilame, but I'm not sure that's what they are referring to in this instance. The manual recommends stripping the movement only so far as removing the balance wheel and bridge -- then cleaning the remainder as a unit, and finally applying the oils -- so if a person follows this procedure, I can't see any reasonable way to get an even coating on the relevant part.

I have attached a screencap from the service manual, showing the location where they want the "spreading oil" applied (it's marked as "A").  The impression I get is that they are calling for an oil that will wick into gaps.

I can see how a grease might work here, though -- thank you for the suggestion.

 

PointA.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, WorldPowerLabs said:

Thank you for your suggestion, rogart63.  You may be correct about the Epilame, but I'm not sure that's what they are referring to in this instance. The manual recommends stripping the movement only so far as removing the balance wheel and bridge -- then cleaning the remainder as a unit, and finally applying the oils -- so if a person follows this procedure, I can't see any reasonable way to get an even coating on the relevant part.

I have attached a screencap from the service manual, showing the location where they want the "spreading oil" applied (it's marked as "A").  The impression I get is that they are calling for an oil that will wick into gaps.

I can see how a grease might work here, though -- thank you for the suggestion.

 

PointA.png

They probably mean something else? Something that will spread around under there? Have no idea actually? 

Maybe could dilute 9010 with Naptha so that it spreads more easy? 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you both for your replies.  I had a chance to begin stripping the movement apart and I found that I can actually gain good access to the friction pinion by disassembling the movement just a little beyond the officially-recommended degree of disassembly -- and by doing so, I'll be able to oil it directly with 9010 rather than hoping that the oil will spread to the proper area.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...
  • 1 month later...

@Marc Funny, I was expecting 9010 for the pivots (instead of 1300), those devils are spinning! But I would be wrong (I checked the service sheet ;) The big speed is a relative one (between each two in each set). The entire reverser wheel speed is quite slow, so 1300 will do!

Thank you for that!

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am having trouble getting Lubeta into Australia as Cousins UK and Cas-Ker US wont send as it is dangerous goods. So I might have to make up my own Epilame of 9010 in Naptha if I can find the right ratio. Member Rogart63 suggested it might be 100 to 3 . 3 parts oil to 100 parts of naptha. Thoughts? 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I understand you have to mix those two, but how do you actually do that in real life?

I believe you have to make a large quantity (with some sort of seringe). Because if I count 100 drops of naphta, they will be gone by the time  I finished counting :) 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a relative who is a vet and who is practised in mixing small volume mixtures in mls. I am seeing him tomorrow (Aussie time) so I will ask unless it's resolved here in the meantime. I don't believe it's done in drops but in volume measure. 

Edited by John Hondros
Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 minutes ago, matabog said:

I understand you have to mix those two, but how do you actually do that in real life?

I believe you have to make a large quantity (with some sort of seringe). Because if I count 100 drops of naphta, they will be gone by the time  I finished counting :) 

That stuff evaporates faster than an open bottle of scotch that's for sure. :) I am assuming naptha is the american for lighter fluid right? 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...

I'm pretty well set up for oils for wrist watches, but not so for pocket watches.

I'm yet to buy Moebius 9020 which I will be buying on my next order from Cousins.

I've just cleaned and serviced an 8 day car clock which I'm guessing is from the 20s or 30s which is essentially an oversized pocket watch.

Can I get away using 9010 on the pivots or should I wait until I get 9020?

Also I currently have 9415 for the pallets which I know is the recommended oil for watches over 19,800bph.

Should I also be investing in 941/2 for the slower beat watches, or will 9415 be ok too.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you want to stick with Moebius use  clock oil 8031.

I always preferred JD Windles Clock Oil for all clocks apart from clocks that had a platform escapement, then it would be a watch oil but not too thin.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

Also I currently have 9415 for the pallets which I know is the recommended oil for watches over 19,800bph.

Should I also be investing in 941/2 for the slower beat watches, or will 9415 be ok too.

I have read that 9415 is especially developped for high speed escapement, and can cause loss of amplitude on slower beat watches. For that reason, after a long time using only 9415 on pallet stones I have recently invested in 941/2. 

It is a lot thinner than 9415, but I can't say that I have noticed a difference in performance. I wanted to experiment with both on the same movement and measure the difference but haven't got arount to it yet....

As for the car clock, I have worked on a few and i used 9010 on the balance jewels, and D5/ HP1300 on the rest of the train with no issue, I could not justify yet another type of oil for this application, the clocks I was workin on were not exactly high end!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had never heard of JD Windles Clock Oil before, so I looked it up.

The price is certainly good so I have added that to my list for my next order from Cousins as I'm not completely happy with the oil I have been using on clocks and 50ml should last me for ever.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Mark locked this topic
  • Mark unpinned this topic
  • Mark pinned, unpinned and featured this topic
  • Mark pinned this topic
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.



  • Recently Browsing

    • No registered users viewing this page.
  • Topics

  • Posts

    • It sounds as though you are happy with this situation and have no ill feelings towards Swiss manufacturers whatsoever.  😄
    • Hey everyone I enjoy tinkering and used to get my fix by making knives, but with a baby (now toddler) that hobby has been put on pause.  My co-workers dad used to be a watchmaker but had to stop due to arthritis. I was lucky enough for him to give me some basic supplies to get started along with some busted movements and books. After destroying one movement I signed up for Mark's online course and have made my way through half of it while working on a couple of my own movements. Eventually I'd like to get to the point where I can buy vintage pieces and restore a handful a year. There is surprisingly little information on watchmaking and this forum has already been a great help. Cheers! Adam  
    • Any chance you can take some pictures and give a quick review of the tool? I suspect many of us will be quite interested in this tool.   I agree that some of the Swiss-branded tools are at least made in part in China, but touched-up/finished marginally in Switzerland. On the other hand, some of the Chinese tools are really a direct clone of the tool, which wouldn’t be so vexing if they actually worked as advertised: I bought some pallet forks for 2824-2 from china which were advertised to be compatible with ETA 2824-2 but couldn’t fit in the jewels. I have had better experience with Chinese tools that have their their own branding (such as Weishi), but even then, there are sometimes multiple listings on AliExpress of seemingly identical items with different Chinese brands. I would think that if one was a Chinese-speaking watch enthusiast in China, it would be easier to locate reliable Chinese tool manufacturers (as @HectorLooi previously mentioned) but for us, we have to rely on actual reviews from people who own the item!
    • Wow a thousand pound watch and the stem removal is booby traped by poor design 😎
    • I have just taken delivery of one of these myself.  After the nightmare I had with a Tag Heuer where the seconds hand popped off its tube when I used hand leavers like I always did with all the other watches I have stripped down, one set of Tag hands cost me £120, so the price paid for the hand lift tool £145 is not so bad if it saves me from that nightmare situation again. They are well made and a quality product, just got to wait for the next Tag to land on my desk to try it out in anger. Also remember not all these Chinese tools are clones or copies, some of them are the same tools some of the Swiss makers claim to make, they have their tools made in China and just package them in made in Switzerland boxes. I have some that are so identical the parts are fully interchangable with the Swiss version and all the machining marks are identical, showing they are off the same production line, and just sent to a different logo printer. The Swiss watch industry is a very shady industry, from watch makers only being bracelet makers who use a generic movement from a movement maker to the likes of Rolex who although they are a multi million company don't pay any tax because they are set up as a charitable organisation but only fund themselves, to their tool makers who have their tools made in China but claim they are made in Switzerland and charge over inflated prices for the same tool that can sometimes be bought direct from China at a fraction of the price the Swiss charge.
×
×
  • Create New...