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very interesting ! steam locomotives and steam tractors.  did they have an oil that could withstand high temp. steam?  the Lear corporation tried to re introduce the steam automobile.   it failed from piston cylinder oiling.  vin

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18 hours ago, vinn3 said:

very interesting ! steam locomotives and steam tractors.  did they have an oil that could withstand high temp. steam?  the Lear corporation tried to re introduce the steam automobile.   it failed from piston cylinder oiling.  vin

Most of the big oil producers/blenders still make steam cylinder oil. You want the oil to be easily carried over with the steam.

Steam oil comes in three weights (Common weights) 400, 600, and 1000. The 400 is good with lower pressure engines (150psi boiler)

the 600 works well in engines with boiler pressures around the 200psi. The 1000 is regarded as being an oil for super heated steam.

That said I use the 1000 in my wet steam 200psi engine.

Have a look at the Stanley steam cars, will open any ones eyes as to how well steam can be used.

Merry christmas.

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Interesting all the talk online about oil alternatives and high cost. The fact is that once one splurges on the proper oils, he will likely never enter the discussion again. It's likely a one and done proposition.

JMO,

Dave

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  • 3 weeks later...

First let me say I know absolutely nothing.  However, I'm reading The Watch Repairer's Manual by Henry B. Fried, 1973 edition.  In his second chapter on watch cleaning he says you need three types of lubricants:  Fine watch oil for the train and escapement pivots, clock oil for the mainspring and white vaseline for the winding mechanism.  The dust cover describes Mr. Fried as "our most eminent living horologist".  Apparently he was alive in 1973.  I'm guessing that this was the state of the art regarding lubrication in 1973.  Since he recommends cleaning and lubrication every 9 t0 12 months I don't think he is talking about synthetic watch oil.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 12/24/2017 at 4:09 AM, Kevin said:

I have to say the oil side of watch repair makes me smile. Back in November  put in an order

for a 55 gallon drum of 1000 weight steam oil for my traction engine. I buy about one drum a year and it lasts well.

Two weeks ago I ordered most of the oils I thought I would need for watch repair, the total quantity came to about 14ml

of oil. I paid a third of the cost of my 55gallons on the watch oils. After the panic had subsided I realised that the

14ml of oil would probably last me most of the rest of my life. Seemed a cheap hobby after that!

Merry Christmas to you all!

I hear that - need the ability to buy a couple of drops at a time - to top it off a lot of these oils have shelf lives!

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  • 1 month later...
1 hour ago, GeorgeClarkson said:

Hi I have seen on the bay someone selling "reconditioned" oils, are they any good? what exactly goes into the process of "reconditioning"?

Please post the link. I can only suppose that's a way to sell "expired" oils.

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I wonder if by "reconditioned" they simply mean rebottled. Perhaps someone trying to capitalise on a better price for a bulk purchase and then sell on in smaller quantities, or indeed selling rebottled oil that was bought cheap because it's out of date. Note that the bottle pictured is not the bottle that you will receive as it clearly states 2ml on the label and the listing is for 1ml. Rebottling it also introduces the risk of contamination, and depending on the integrity of the seller, cutting it with something cheaper, assuming that it is genuine 9010 in the first place.

Either way they need to look at their pricing structure. As JDM says Cousins do a 2ml bottle for £13.75+vat and shipping. That makes it less than £20 all in (at least with shipping within the UK). With the current exchange rate these guys are asking for about £26.50 for 1ml, that's over 2.5 times the Cousins price per ml, and for a product of potentially dubious provenence.

If you're going to spend your money on Moebius then I would give this guys a wide berth. You can get it very much cheaper else where and have better confidence in the product that you receive.

Just my opinion.

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  • 3 months later...
On 2/3/2015 at 8:34 PM, clockboy said:

Blacklab has a good point watch oil is designed to stay in place, car oil is designed to flow. However a very interesting paper

I use mainly Moebius 8000 and 9010. I have some oil made up by a chemist friend in his lab in the oil industry that is very high in surface tension. That is what is required for a watch. Hence Blacklab`s comment is correct. I had a pocket watch in, a Benson that had the 3 in 1 treatment. Oil everywhere, low surface tension for bike bearings etc, Just a clean and lube job, Runs fine now.

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Experimenting with oils (IMO) is madness. Specific watch oils are designed to stay where put and designed for the various parts of a watch/clock. The amount of oil that is required to lubricate a watch is also minuscule. I just don't think it's with the risk. 

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  • 4 months later...

Moebius oils are extremely popular and one of the best. This link takes you to their site, so you can read all about what they have to offer. Most watch and clock suppliers stock them.

 http://www.moebius-lubricants.ch/en/products/oils

 

If you go here this link on our forum gives you a list of various materiel suppliers around the world.

 https://www.watchrepairtalk.com/links/watch-clock-repair-suppliers/

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I would agree, use a quality oil like Moebius - Just in case you are interested in the properties of lubricating materials (and I suspect there is a certain geeky fascination for such things in the audience here), this article gives some insight in to all things slippery. 

https://bestsyntheticoilguide.com/synthetic/viscosity/

It may drag us a bit off topic, but it shows that all oils are not created equal, nor are they all suitable for every application.

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5 hours ago, JCStuyck said:

Thanks. i appreciate your help.

You will find lubrication is ongoing topic amongst horologists with many different views.  However to start with Moebius oils and purchase small amounts as they do have a sell by dates.

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  • 4 months later...

Hi all, I am about to clean and oil a Seiko 6319a movement and have realised I have no idea as to the correct oil/oils to use? Any advice gratefully received, many thanks in advance ! 

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Seiko recommended oils are listed in the service sheet, do you have it? If not, some member will be quick in attaching it here.
Now, Seiko original lubricants can be bought on Ebay for a reasonable price, but more practically you would buy Moebious products, in fact Seiko doesn't even sell a Moebious  "A", that is 9015, equivalent. In any case, there is nothing special about the 6139, just follow the general thread: 

 

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Hi again Watchweasol. Fantastic! Yes it will help me so much in the future. I am happy to admit I know very little and didn't really give oils much attention.... Until today. My head was only thinking about stripping cleaning and putting it back together properly ! We live and learn, today I have learnt something vitality important so thank you very much for taking the time to help me. Best regards Johnnie:)

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