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VWatchie

ETA 1080 "cap jewels" oiling help needed

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These jewels are from my very first ETA movement that I'm servicing (cal. 1080), and none of the movements I've been working on so far (Vostoks, Poljots, and a Unitas 6498) has had jewels like these. My question is simply how to oil them? They do look a lot like cap jewels and maybe that's what they are called? If I were to guess I would say that they should be oiled the same way that spring cap jewels are oiled, but I'd really like to know for sure. And, while I'm at it, what's the purpose of these non-springed "cap jewels"? I've also seen them in pictures of some really old movements having a balance without a shock spring.

The movement comes from my grandfather's (born 1910) Ernest Borel Incastar which we believe he bought sometime in the early 1960-ties. It's a family heirloom, and I've been waiting to service it until having worked up some confidence. I had no idea it harboured an ETA movement so that was a pleasant and rather exciting surprise. As far as I know, it has never been serviced.

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As can be seen in the above picture it has a really interesting regulator mechanism, and I actually found this ad for it on eBay. Setting the rate I would assume is just a matter of rotating that five-pointed "star", but I wonder if that entire arm can be slid to regulate the beat error?

Edited by VWatchie

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jewels like this are used to reduce friction. I have an image where you can see the side view Then for lubrication you can try to put a small drop on the cap and carefully put it back in place without moving it around but that usually isn't the best way.I also have an image showing how to do that. then at other option for lubrication is a automatic oiler. You can insert it through the whole from the backside the oil will flow out.

jewels.jpg

jewel oil.JPG

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Those superfluous cap jewels were often added when there was competition between manufacturers to see who could have the largest jewel count. Felsa even started decorating wheels with jewels just to get the numbers up. 

As John says, you can oil these like any other cap jewel. I sometimes add a minuscule amount of oil to the end of the jewel hole to help the capillary action. 

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22 hours ago, VWatchie said:

 

 

These jewels are from my very first ETA movement that I'm servicing (cal. 1080), and none of the movements I've been working on so far (Vostoks, Poljots, and a Unitas 6498) has had jewels like these. My question is simply how to oil them? They do look a lot like cap jewels and maybe that's what they are called? If I were to guess I would say that they should be oiled the same way that spring cap jewels are oiled, but I'd really like to know for sure. And, while I'm at it, what's the purpose of these non-springed "cap jewels"? I've also seen them in pictures of some really old movements having a balance without a shock spring.

The movement comes from my grandfather's (born 1910) Ernest Borel Incastar which we believe he bought sometime in the early 1960-ties. It's a family heirloom, and I've been waiting to service it until having worked up some confidence. I had no idea it harboured an ETA movement so that was a pleasant and rather exciting surprise. As far as I know, it has never been serviced.

 

As can be seen in the above picture it has a really interesting regulator mechanism, and I actually found this ad for it on eBay. Setting the rate I would assume is just a matter of rotating that five-pointed "star", but I wonder if that entire arm can be slid to regulate the beat error?

It's a pain in the ... to put back  the hairspring on this incastar . Easier to remove . If you need to  replace the balance. 

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For this type of jewel, also seen on the balance in older pieces, I assemble then oil. Drop of oil in the concave hole jewel, then a thin wire to push it to the cap(I use hairspring pins but there are also commercial 'oil pushing wires' for this. Gold colored handle). Keep feeding until the oil circle is correct. This goes for any non shock protected jewels.

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So, I’ve started to reassemble my grandfather’s ETA 1080 and went about it as I always do, with the train wheels. However, when mounting the train wheel bridge I just couldn’t get the pivot of the escape wheel to reach into the cap jewelled pivot hole on the bridge (seen in the first picture in my first post above).

Scratching my head, I removed the escape wheel and inspected it, suspecting the pivot might be damaged. It was not, it looked perfect. So, I tried it again and by holding down the bridge with some peg wood, I could get the pivot to just barely reach into the jewel hole. Yet, as soon as I tried to secure the bridge the pivot would fall out of the hole. Having struggled with this for probably more than half an hour, I began to feel pretty frustrated.

I’m not a very technical person, I don’t have a lot of experience of watch repairing, and in all honesty I guess I’m not too smart, but all of sudden I realized, or rather remembered, that the jewel hole on the dial side has a cap jewel as well and that the escape wheel pivot on the dial side probably fell too deep into the jewel hole as I hadn’t mounted its cap jewel.

Said and done, I oiled the cap as instructed above (it worked out perfectly, thanks!), mounted it on the dial side and then tried to mount the train wheel bridge again. Bingo! This time around the escape wheel pivot reached into to the jewel hole on bridge perfectly. At this point, I felt pretty proud of myself! :biggrin:

Well, just thought I’d share in case someone else who’s new to cap jewels happens to find this thread in the future. I'll try nickelsilver's method the next time around which would have eliminated this problem.

Thank you all for helping out!

Edited by VWatchie

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So finished reassembling and lubricating my grandfather's ETA 1080 today and took a couple of pictures of it before putting it back into its case.

42977694510_46f9b8668d_o.jpg

42977694300_c8bce0843c_o.jpg

For anyone interested I assembled the movement in the order shown by these pictures (000A.jpg, 000B.jpg, 001.jpg to 073.jpg). The pictures were taken during disassembly so the parts in the pictures are somewhat dirty. The pictures were intended for my personal use, so some of the text and coloured arrows might seem somewhat cryptical.

And finally, a slow-motion video of the balance in motion can be seen here. This watch was last used some 40 years ago or so, so just wonderful to see it tick again! :)

This was my first ETA movement and compared the Vostoks and Poljots I've been working on before I must say the fit and finish is indeed a notch or two better. I really enjoyed doing my first Swiss watch (except for the Unitas 6498 in Mark's watch repair lessons).

Edited by VWatchie

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So finished reassembling and lubricating my grandfather's ETA 1080 today and took a couple of pictures of it before putting it back into its case.
42977694510_46f9b8668d_o.jpg&key=522138a1696e9f54de0fd5635826ecb64b0747151f02cfa610318f5c6571b315
42977694300_c8bce0843c_o.jpg&key=e6393e0115f1772a72c5258bba9a7dacf990008a250b25db6507191e58281514
For anyone interested I assembled the movement in the order shown by these pictures (000A.jpg, 000B.jpg, 001.jpg to 073.jpg). The pictures were taken during disassembly so the parts in the pictures are somewhat dirty. The pictures were intended for my personal use, so some of the text and coloured arrows might seem somewhat cryptical.
And finally, a slow-motion video of the balance in motion can be
. This watch was last used some 40 years ago or so, so just wonderful to see it tick again! 
This was my first ETA movement and compared the Vostoks and Poljots I've been working on before I must say the fit and finish is indeed a notch or two better. I really enjoyed doing my first Swiss watch (except for the Unitas 6498 in Mark's watch repair lessons).
Great job! I'm sure the disassembly pictures will come in useful to someone. Beautiful watch by the way! Your Grandfather had great taste

Sent from my Redmi 4X using Tapatalk

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On ‎9‎/‎20‎/‎2018 at 5:57 PM, JBerry said:

Great job! I'm sure the disassembly pictures will come in useful to someone. Beautiful watch by the way! Your Grandfather had great taste

Sent from my Redmi 4X using Tapatalk
 

Thank you very much for your warm words, and what a great way to remember my grandfather. My 9-year-old son is actually named after him.

Oh, just to make sure; the disassembly pictures serve as assembly pictures but were taken during the dismantling. However, as I learned, the dial side escape wheel cap jewel must be put in place before the train wheel bridge can be secured (as explained in my previous post).

Edited by VWatchie

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