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Good evening all , just wondering do any of you guys or gals like to use capillary fountain oilers . I have been using them combined with dip oilers for a while and I must say I enjoy using the capillary oilers some times over the dip oilers . Am I old fashioned or what ? 

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20 years ago I got one as part of my tool kit at school; neither I nor the other students liked them. Too hard to control the amount, too uncertain if the oil at the tip is really clean, too hard to clean out and change oils. For me it's dip oilers all the way, I don't even use my Bergeon automatic oiler.

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I understand where your coming from but the same can be said about the dippers as far as control and cleanliness , but obviously you have to use the right one for what your oiling . I taught myself how to  get the exact amount without touching the jewel . I don't use them all the time about 30 percent . yor right about being hard to clean that's why I clean them out once a week when I use them. need to soak overnight in lighter fluid then into ultrasonic tub ,then rinse and rinse and rinse .However sometimes especially on ladies movements  I can nail the oiling without any magnification . Is that good or what?

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