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Hi Fellow People,

Im reaching out as I’m currently learning all I can about watchmaking, and am working through the BHI distance learning technicians course, with my exam booked for May. 

I will need to service a quartz watch as part of my practical exam, and am learning about watch lubrication. 

A few months ago I found a great article that covered the technique for dipping and collecting the right amount of oil on the oiler, such as the speed and angle of the dip, however, I now can’t find it anywhere, no matter how much I search the internet 

Does anyone have or can point me in the right direction of instructions specifically on oil collection on the oiler?  As you will know there is lots on the actual oiling process but not the oil collection process.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.  

Thanks

Bethan

 

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