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DoctoralHermit

How can I fix this broken Seiko bracelet?

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Hey all! This is my first bracelet repair, so I have no idea what I'm doing. I have a broken Seiko bracelet, but it doesn't seem to have pins. It does have a small bit with a seam at the end, as visible in these pictures:

 

 

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Broken pin. Isn't that easy to do a good repair. You need to push out the stumps from the link and arrange a proper replacement link. You need precise tools and a small press or vice, dies etc. 

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1 hour ago, jdm said:

Broken pin. Isn't that easy to do a good repair. You need to push out the stumps from the link and arrange a proper replacement link. You need precise tools and a small press or vice, dies etc. 

Ok, thank you very much for your advice!

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Some times on this type of bracelet providing all the old pin has been removed, you can fix it using a spring bar, the sort you use to fix the bracelet to the watch case. I'm not saying it works every time but its worth a try. You can buy very thin bars, it need to be thin to go through the middle part of the bracelet. 

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I gave a better look at the picture, this type of bracelet uses a thin shaped plate to join links, not a pin, and that is what broke. So you would have to push it out first (not easy as if not part of adjusting links is not meant to be removed), and then make a new one using maybe a jeweler piercing saw and files, or you can get another from another bracelet, or try what oldhippy said, I did a repair like that once. 

Finally a note about tools, all I meant to say is that they have to work for the job, not that they have to come from a given country. Prejudice in this sense is useless, especially when aspersed without specific reason or contribution. 

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I have repaired quite a few of these type bands.  The U shaped pins / plates indicated by the blue arrows appear to be the ones that are more easily removed.  You should see directional removing arrows stamped on the inside of the band.  The plates pointed to with red arrows are removable but will take more care in getting those out.  Unfortunately, this is the part that has been broken in your case.

You may experiment with removing one of the plates indicated with the blue arrows just to see how they are removed.

George

 

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