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bobm12

Tweezers advice?

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Dumont number 3 for standard watch repairs. Can't remember the number for fine work but always Dumont. I would buy cheap tweezers from Southern Watch & Clock Suppliers (anyone remember them) I think they were in Orpington Kent when they had a sale on just for clock work. I would file the old ones down and use them for when I would be soldering or bluing screws.     

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Dumont number 3 for standard watch repairs. Can't remember the number for fine work but always Dumont. I would buy cheap tweezers from Southern Watch & Clock Suppliers (anyone remember them) I think they were in Orpington Kent when they had a sale on just for clock work. I would file the old ones down and use them for when I would be soldering or bluing screws.     

I think you mean number 5 . That is long and sharp . I love Vetus tweezers . Have Dumont but prefer the Vetus . Much more springiness in the Vetus . 

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I just got a pair of Erem brass tweezers from Amazon for about $15 shipped. Them seem to be of decent quality. If I have time on the weekend I'll compare them to my Bergeon brass tweezers and post my impressions. It'd be nice to have something in between the almost useless India made tweezers I have and my $40+ Bergeon tweezers.

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I got to use my new Erem brass tweezers last night and so far, I'm impressed. They're a little lighter and finer tipped than my Bergeons and the tips are flat - less pointy. I'm not sure if that's an advantage or a disadvantage. The tips are well aligned out of the package, which is good since learning to dress tweezers is still on my to do list. They felt very secure, no parts pinged on me and I was easily able to manipulate tiny parts comfortably. I'm still prefer the Bergeon 2AM tweezers, maybe because I'm just used to them, but I think the Erem tweezers are very, very good for the money. I'll probably pick up another pair.

 

erem_bergeon01.JPG

 

Bergeon in the front, Erem in the back

 

erem_bergeon02.JPG

 

 

The rest of the photos are all Erem. You can see the beveled chisel type of point they have.

 

erem01.JPG

 

 

erem03.JPG

 

 

erem04.JPG

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I bought a set of Vetus tweezers from Cousins because I wanted to try different sizes and shapes. All needed a lot of dressing and none feel as good to use as my one Dumont set. If I had to choose between the Vetus set and the one Dumont, I'd go with Dumont every time.

However, I'm liking the pics of the Erem above - nice review Don

S

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Tcarpilot,

I bought a set of very nice tweezers from an Ebay company called RED ROOSTER UK. I don't know if they still carry the same brand I bought but it might be worth checking them out. At the time I only paid $30.00 for the entire set and they worked great.

david

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The brand of tweezers I purchased from Red Rooster UK were called Stella Tweezers. They were very well made and have performed beautifully over the past several years. I also bought a set from Finding King called Moon Tweezers. The Moon tweezers had to be reworked with a sharpening stone in order to get them to work properly but the Stella tweezers worked perfectly right out of the pack. I don't know if Red Rooster still carries that brand or not. The only tweezer I was not able to find a less expensive substitute  for, was the Dumont #5. Other than that the Stella's have worked out just as well as my Dumonts.

david

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Most tweezers are designed and manufactured for the medical and dental industries. The angled tips are useful in a restricted work space such as someone's mouth. The world has a lot more doctors and dentists than watchmakers. Some of the tools that watchmakers and jewelers use have been borrowed from other industries.

david

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Whilst engaged in another thread a question kept coming to mind but it didn't really belong there. So I'll ask here.

With tweezers do you prefer stainless steel or high quality carbon steel ? Or do people not really care.

My own preference is carbon steel because it will retain its shape well and when "stressed" is easily corrected, which is not the case with stainless

 

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Stainless for disassembly Brass for assembly thats my preference.

I can see why you would do that. Stainless incase something doesn't come out or off the way it should and brass minimising risk of scratches and damaged to tweezers. That's very clever ! I will adopt this myself with my brass tweezers.
Many thanks for your reply

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' stressed tweezers !! ' why ? Because in my personal sense, you do not raise a brick or you do not squeeze a piece out of hand? For the sorts of metals concerning the tweezers, I imagine that everyone makes use of what he has provided that they are not magnetised. Finally, if we take care of our tools, I can easily imagine that we should not be forced to twist our tweezers. On the other hand, for screwdrivers, it is different because I saw tons of watchmakers On Youtube that work poorly and do not take the proper size of screwdriver for different screws ... I do not know much about watchmaking but my tools, I take care of it ;)

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' stressed tweezers !! ' why ? Because in my personal sense, you do not raise a brick or you do not squeeze a piece out of hand? For the sorts of metals concerning the tweezers, I imagine that everyone makes use of what he has provided that they are not magnetised. Finally, if we take care of our tools, I can easily imagine that we should not be forced to twist our tweezers. On the other hand, for screwdrivers, it is different because I saw tons of watchmakers On Youtube that work poorly and do not take the proper size of screwdriver for different screws ... I do not know much about watchmaking but my tools, I take care of it

In this context it refers to the ability to retain shape under normal and unforseen circumstances.
Cheap steel has no flexibility to return to shape so constant maintenance would be required.
English gunmakers prefer a mild steel (EN21) in their gun barrels! Though this quality steel enjoys a great deal of flexibility to return to shape even when pushed beyond its normal working pressure. Due to faulty ammunition.
German makers tended to use a much harder steel. Though could shatter with fatal consequences when pushed beyond its normal working pressure. This rarely happened .
It's all a question of getting the right balance.

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My cousin is a gunsmith. He uses all kinds of small tweezers; there's lots of small parts in a gun. 
I was was telling him about having problems with watch springs flying across the room and he said, "You too!?"
 

That's funny

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