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I have heard that the big Swiss watch manufactures buys most of the brass tweezers that Dumont are producing. That`s why they are probably hard to get. They are not cheap either. Bergeon´s brass tweezers are made by Dumont. 

 

Morten

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I have had many brands of Tweezers over the years and always keep coming back to Dumont.   Size 5 or 4 for hairspring work. Size 2 For general work.   I personally have no use for any other size

I've been using the Dumoxel #2 and #5 mainly (I lean towards #5 mostly) but I've seen Mark's tweezers in the videos and they look mighty good and strong....Since my #2's are a little battered I was wo

If you're handling delicate steel parts, brass tweezers are safer because they're softer than steel and won't mark the components.

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I still haven't purchase the carbon fibre ones to try. Currently I use stainless steel for the screws, wheels , springs etc., and a set of stiff plastic ones with a broad but thin tip for lifting bridges. Even brass can mark the soft copper plating on some movements if you inadvertently slip.

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The horotec carbon fiber I got doesn't feel "springy" in the hand and I don't like the feeling nevertheless, I bought them to handle hands and for that, they do amazingly well and no scratch on the lume. I got some other from cousins so I'll be testing them shortly and report back.

 

Cheers,

 

Bob

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  • 2 months later...

I have tried many tweezers of different makes but have been using Dumont for a while now & have been very pleased with them. No.2 for normal work & 5,s for finer work.

I found the cheaper tweezers were OK but I seemed to be re-dressing them on regular basis but the Dumont just keep their shape. 

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Good set of tweezers that don't break the bank?
Sorry, but no such animal exists.

 

Cheap tweezers aren't good, and good tweezers aren't cheap.

 

I only use one pair of tweezers for everything; except hairsprings of course ... a pair of Gold Plated Brass Dumont #4's that I've custom shaped just the way I like them.

 

post-246-0-28411300-1430608366_thumb.jpg

 

Brass tweezers don't ping parts like steel, never become magnetized, have a lovely soft free, and I never have to worry about marking parts with them.

I've been using them 8hrs a day, 5 days a week for 7months, and at the most I have to give them a light dressing once a week.

... I will cry when they are worn out :(, and they will receive a royal burial with full military honours.

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I only use one pair of tweezers for everything; except hairsprings of course ... a pair of Gold Plated Brass Dumont #4's that I've custom shaped just the way I like them.

 

 

Lawson, I was so impressed that instead of clicking on 'like', I searched the web for a gold plated Dumont brass Nr. 4. It doesn't appear to be anymore available. So I have whittled down a brass Nr. 5 and have almost perfected the tips. Here it is before final dressing and gold plating.

 

post-374-0-60082900-1430934295.jpg

Edited by cdjswiss
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Lawson, I was so impressed that instead of clicking on 'like', I searched the web for a gold plated Dumont brass Nr. 4. It doesn't appear to be anymore available. So I have whittled down a brass Nr. 5 and have almost perfected the tips. Here it is before final dressing and gold plating.

 

Nice work CDJ.

There's nothing like customizing your tweezers so they are just the way you like them. 

Yes, it takes a little time to develop the skills to dress your tweezers; but the rewards for you effort are well worth it IMHO.

 

This is the video I used to begin to learn how to dress my tweezers ... his instructions and tips for dress are most excellent.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=injDQHraiLI

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 I searched the web for a gold plated Dumont brass Nr. 4. It doesn't appear to be anymore available.

 

There is a company in Australia that appears to still sell these particular Dumont Tweezers. 

I know personally I want to grab a few pairs and store them away in case they discontinue them, because changing tweezers for me will be like changing my hands for someone else's.

 

I have emailed them for pricing.  So if anyone is interested in also buying a pair, please post below and I'll see if we can arrange a group buy and save some $$$.

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Dumont number 3 for standard watch repairs. Can't remember the number for fine work but always Dumont. I would buy cheap tweezers from Southern Watch & Clock Suppliers (anyone remember them) I think they were in Orpington Kent when they had a sale on just for clock work. I would file the old ones down and use them for when I would be soldering or bluing screws.     

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Dumont number 3 for standard watch repairs. Can't remember the number for fine work but always Dumont. I would buy cheap tweezers from Southern Watch & Clock Suppliers (anyone remember them) I think they were in Orpington Kent when they had a sale on just for clock work. I would file the old ones down and use them for when I would be soldering or bluing screws.     

I think you mean number 5 . That is long and sharp . I love Vetus tweezers . Have Dumont but prefer the Vetus . Much more springiness in the Vetus . 

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I just got a pair of Erem brass tweezers from Amazon for about $15 shipped. Them seem to be of decent quality. If I have time on the weekend I'll compare them to my Bergeon brass tweezers and post my impressions. It'd be nice to have something in between the almost useless India made tweezers I have and my $40+ Bergeon tweezers.

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I got to use my new Erem brass tweezers last night and so far, I'm impressed. They're a little lighter and finer tipped than my Bergeons and the tips are flat - less pointy. I'm not sure if that's an advantage or a disadvantage. The tips are well aligned out of the package, which is good since learning to dress tweezers is still on my to do list. They felt very secure, no parts pinged on me and I was easily able to manipulate tiny parts comfortably. I'm still prefer the Bergeon 2AM tweezers, maybe because I'm just used to them, but I think the Erem tweezers are very, very good for the money. I'll probably pick up another pair.

 

erem_bergeon01.JPG

 

Bergeon in the front, Erem in the back

 

erem_bergeon02.JPG

 

 

The rest of the photos are all Erem. You can see the beveled chisel type of point they have.

 

erem01.JPG

 

 

erem03.JPG

 

 

erem04.JPG

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I bought a set of Vetus tweezers from Cousins because I wanted to try different sizes and shapes. All needed a lot of dressing and none feel as good to use as my one Dumont set. If I had to choose between the Vetus set and the one Dumont, I'd go with Dumont every time.

However, I'm liking the pics of the Erem above - nice review Don

S

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