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Watch of Today

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From the best of times to the würst of times.

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I am not making this up, but the thing didn't actually work until I added a little oil(*). It seems that in order to get the sausages movement moving, you need to add some grease. {Insert double entendre laden sausage joke of your choice here}.

(*) Actually I needed to free it up with a little lighter fluid, then oil the pivots,.

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Interesting... I have my own Luch 3055 in the shop right now. It began to run intermittently, then stopped... so I gave it a good cleaning and lube, and now while the electronics drive the balance successfully, and the pallet fork is actuating normally, drive isn’t transferring to the train wheels. Interestingly, our local watchmaker is from Minsk, where the Luch was made.

gryf

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5 hours ago, Gryf said:

Interesting... I have my own Luch 3055 in the shop right now. It began to run intermittently, then stopped... so I gave it a good cleaning and lube, and now while the electronics drive the balance successfully, and the pallet fork is actuating normally, drive isn’t transferring to the train wheels. Interestingly, our local watchmaker is from Minsk, where the Luch was made.

gryf

I have two of these things. My blue-dialled one runs faultlessly (touch wood!) whilst this white-dialled one will run for months but does run fast. After re-setting the time, it can be a bit of a bear to get it re-started and I'd always wondered if it wasn't de-hacking properly.

Anyway, I hope your watchmaker can get yours running properly.

Regards.

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Watches of today and a little bit of international cross dressing, who says we 'aint adventurous round here. :devil:

Well what the heck, we Scots have been known to wear the occasional skirt kilt (albeit with a handily placed traditional dirk in our sock to keep the childish crowds from sniggering). 

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First, and arguably the most interesting, a Soviet era Sekonda 17 jewel ladies. Dead on arrival, but now keeping remarkably good time following a service. Man that thing is tiny. The least little shake or sneeze and the those microscopic parts would be in orbit.

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A steady hand and a lot of patience got it spruced up, oiled and dialed in to around +5 to +15 sec per day. It is swinging away quite nicely, and it too looks hardly worn. It was remarkably clean and the even the strap looks unworn, though a little dry with age. It doesn't even have any of the usual heavy kinks in it. 

Next up is a a "Unisex" German Krippl (with an Epson Japanese movement). Picked up in a job lot in brand new unworn condition still with protective film, but dead battery. Not unattractive, but neither is it very exciting.

Finally the current daily work watch (the Swatch is taking a well earned rest) - the Lorus day date quartz, which you may have spotted in a few other posts.

Edited by AndyHull

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Fine for life onboard a submarine perhaps, but not much use for timing the air remaining in your tanks. It doesn't even appear to be waterproof. They could at least have gone to the trouble of kidding us on that waterproof to 3mm was a thing.

Mind you, some watches go completely overboard with their claims (pun intended).

Examples here.

Jo24LzoRRmeBfK03mcCk_tmp4290301516201328

If I end up 15,000m under water, I doubt if I will be worrying what time it is anymore, since I will presumably be on a different planet.


The maximum known depth of water on planet earth is 10,994 metres (36,070 ft) (± 40 metres [130 ft]) at the southern end of a small slot-shaped valley in its floor known as the Challenger Deep.[2] However, some un-repeated measurements place the deepest portion at 11,034 metres (36,201 ft). (Source - Wikipedia).

Edited by AndyHull

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Yesterday's little Seconda put in a pretty impressive performance for such a tiny movement.

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Here it is more than 24hrs later, still ticking away strongly (but starting to flag slightly, judging by the slight increase in rate).

You will be glad to hear I've stopped wearing it now and gone back to something a bit more masculine. :P People were beginning to talk.

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Replacing the Seconda is this Casio AQ 230 with a nice crisp black dial.

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The crystal still needs a little bit of the shine restored to it, but it makes a nice companion for the white dial version I have, which I posted about back in February.

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Edited by AndyHull

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Todays (old) new watch is this Brunoff quartz chrono using a Miyota movement.

I bought this years ago for a project which just didn't work, during the course of storage disassembled and reassembly I lost one of the sub dial hands hence why the 24 hour sub dial has none but (usually) I know if it's morning or night.

So this is legitimately the first time wearing out of the box. Just that it's been there years and in bits more than once ish.

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34mm UMF from the good ol’ GDR with its 0j UMF 23.

This was a relatively short-lived (1961 – 1963) movement before being superseded by the easier (and cheaper) to manufacture UMF 24 series which then went on to sell more than 100 million units, mainly to the West.

Regards.

 

UMF G.p. 2019 6.JPG

UMF G.p. UMF 23 2019 2.JPG

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On 6/6/2019 at 9:31 AM, AndyHull said:

Fine for life onboard a submarine perhaps, but not much use for timing the air remaining in your tanks. It doesn't even appear to be waterproof. They could at least have gone to the trouble of kidding us on that waterproof to 3mm was a thing.

Mind you, some watches go completely overboard with their claims (pun intended).

Examples here.

Jo24LzoRRmeBfK03mcCk_tmp4290301516201328

If I end up 15,000m under water, I doubt if I will be worrying what time it is anymore, since I will presumably be on a different planet.


The maximum known depth of water on planet earth is 10,994 metres (36,070 ft) (± 40 metres [130 ft]) at the southern end of a small slot-shaped valley in its floor known as the Challenger Deep.[2] However, some un-repeated measurements place the deepest portion at 11,034 metres (36,201 ft). (Source - Wikipedia).

I would hate to think of the pressure.

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1973 Timex Marlin - This really was a diamond in the rough. The crystal probably needs replacing, but I managed to get the rather obvious dings and gouges in it smoothed out to the point where they are hardly noticeable, with the possible exception of the one over the day and the even more obvious one at half past one.

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I also gave it deep clean, followed by a quick service and replaced the sticking crown locking lever. These tend to wear to the point where you can no longer pull out the crown. I have managed to file them back to life, but I had a spare, so I just did a quick swap.

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It now winds, hands adjust, it runs, and you can easily see the time none of which was possible when it arrived.

A fresh leather band replaced the insanitary hair puller, and it was fit to wear. I'll do the final tinkering and polishing once it has proved itself reliable, on my wrist for a couple of days.

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Today I pulled out a seldom worn Crepas L'ocean....  

Here's the link to their site....  http://www.crepaswatches.com/styled/photos-4/index.html

There are quite a few features on this watch and although it does have a presence , I find it very comfortable to wear .

It comes with the Stainless Steel Bracelet , and also a silicone bright Blue strap with the link to clear he crown .

 

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