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4 hours ago, balaton said:

Blimey, I see what you mean.

What you've got there would appear to be two French-made Framelac pin-levers, a movement maker about which very little seems to be recorded. I've attached an image from the Uhrforum.de of the jewelled-lever FR 304 for comparison of the bridge configuration (similar) and the shape of the balance cock (identical). 

Framlec FR 304 mvmt.jpg

Thanks for the info. The Rodeo is remarkably similar to this.

https://www.uhrwerksarchiv.de/movements/c/crc/crc-960/

CRC_960.jpg

.. but perhaps is closer to this.

https://17jewels.info/movements/c/crc/crc-860/

 

CRC_860.jpg

It has the cruder balance, but a different "shock" spring arrangement as opposed to what looks suspiciously like glue on the example here. 

The "LiJac" is certainly from the same stable, but even simpler in its construction.

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Well, that's pretty convincing and I think you've nailed these oddities!

I certainly don't have any examples of them in my collection of old nonsenses. Neither, obviously, does Ranfft, so well done Chris Lorenz.

Cheers. 

Edit: This in response to @AndyHull last posting

Edited by balaton
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Long time since I popped a pic of a watch here .. but today I thought I'll hang a noname watch around my wrist.
The Purple danger has a modified 2824-2 raving under the hood, the date function har been removed ;)  .

 

Face.jpg

Back.jpg

Movement.jpg

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Swapped to this since it just arrived.
Stripped and cleaned of all the accompanying DNA
Still can't figure out why the orange hand and the mode hand revert to this position after reinserting the stem after recasing.

gR8wvir.jpg

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An "almost new" HMT Janata today. It did require a service and a bit of a polish to get it to this state, but I'm pretty pleased with the result. This one appears to be completely original.

JanataBlack.thumb.jpg.ed0ad3d41f9908b5f77fe69d668e9dbc.jpg

I have a bunch more HMTs waiting in the wings to join the 404 club, I'm just a little short of that all important ingredient "spare time" at the moment. I'll post the rest when I get a chance to work on them.

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An "almost new" HMT Janata today. It did require a service and a bit of a polish to get it to this state, but I'm pretty pleased with the result. This one appears to be completely original.
JanataBlack.thumb.jpg.ed0ad3d41f9908b5f77fe69d668e9dbc.jpg
I have a bunch more HMTs waiting in the wings to join the 404 club, I'm just a little short of that all important ingredient "spare time" at the moment. I'll post the rest when I get a chance to work on them.
Love the art deco numbers

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An "almost new" HMT Janata today. It did require a service and a bit of a polish to get it to this state, but I'm pretty pleased with the result. This one appears to be completely original.
JanataBlack.thumb.jpg.ed0ad3d41f9908b5f77fe69d668e9dbc.jpg
I have a bunch more HMTs waiting in the wings to join the 404 club, I'm just a little short of that all important ingredient "spare time" at the moment. I'll post the rest when I get a chance to work on them.
Love the art deco numbers

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3 minutes ago, ro63rto said:

Love the art deco numbers emoji106.png

Also waiting in the wings (pun intended) is this near identical white dial version.

AsPurchased2.jpg.27ec9efaf172ddcab4e84f3ed56f628b.jpg

I've not had a chance to work on that one yet, but it is probably going to be the next victim on the healing bench.

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Today, a 38mm Aidix, attributed to Rene Brandt and running on an unusual variant of the 14’’’ 15j ETA 853.

So far, the earliest confirmable date of brand registration recorded has been 1952, but I would have tended to put this particular example in the previous decade.

Regards.

Aidix 2.JPG

Aidix ETA 853 2018.JPG

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1 minute ago, balaton said:

Today, a 38mm Aidix, attributed to Rene Brandt and running on an unusual variant of the 14’’’ 15j ETA 853.

So far, the earliest confirmable date of brand registration recorded has been 1952, but I would have tended to put this particular example in the previous decade.

Regards.

Aidix 2.JPG

 

Nice sunburst dial, and I've always preferred sub seconds in a dress watch. The movement reminds me of the AS 1130

J

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