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AndyHull

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AndyHull last won the day on November 3

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  1. I got it back together, and it is running. I adapted JerseyMo's trick, but rather than back off the screw, I supported the balance wheel on a couple of small pips of rodico, to keep it in place, and level, then laid the fork as per JerseyMo's picture. This made life a lot easier. Still a bit of a faff, but certainly a lot less of the feeling of attempting to balance a bunch of marbles on an upturned dinner plate. I left it running overnight, (without the hands, in case I need to strip it again). I'll post some pics when I am happy with the way it is running. Thanks for the tip @JerseyMo I also cleaned up the unexploded mainspring, so that is now in my parts stash, ready for the next victim.
  2. Should of course read "... or perhaps the second hand, or tube rubbing ..."
  3. I would suspect there is still some slight wear or perhaps dirt causing issues, but given the age of the watch, I personally would be reluctant to do much more to it. Any idea what caused this little glitch? Also if you look at the variation in the amplitude, it appears to have a very specific period to it. This suggests perhaps slight eccentricity, localized wear, or dirt on one of the wheels or perhaps the second or tube hand rubbing. Depending on the regularity of this error, you may be able to figure its source out.
  4. It arrived, and it turned out to be a Marlin from 1971. The dial is immaculate, however there is a little corrosion, and the mainspring would not release, so I thought.. "I've got plenty of those, I'll just replace it.. how hard can it be?" Well extracting it was the first problem. It is fully wound.. and I couldn't release it, so I removed it very gingerly, then I set about fitting its replacement. Is Timex induced insanity a recognised medical condition I wonder? If not it should be. I've just spent the last hour trying to re-assemble the thing. Every time I get the balance in place, the palette fork moves, once I get those two steady, the escape wheel jumps out of place, I get that back under control and place the other gears, and blow me.. the palette fork is back out of place again. Give me an HMT or a Sekonda or .. well pretty much anything else.. This thing is driving me nuts. I've set it aside for the time being. I will not be beaten though... even if I do end up being carted off to the room with the rubber walls, in a suit that buttons up the back, muttering "wibble", repeatedly while rocking backwards and forwards, I'm sure it will be worth it. I'll post pictures.. if I ever get it done. Meantime, here is something you don't see every day. A fully wound mainspring.. without an attached watch. Don't stand too close, it might go off at any moment.
  5. .. or .. I could pick one up the next time I'm in the supermarket and avoid a prolonged bout of caveman's earache.
  6. A neat idea. I could 3D print the vacuum cleaner hose adapter, and I'm sure I have a suitable clear plastic box, now all I need to do is liberate that tea strainer from the kitchen without my wife spotting me.
  7. Thanks for that. I'm in the middle of designing a replacement part for one of my clapped out old microscopes. Once I've printed that, I suspect your hand press will be the next thing to come out of the hot plastic spaghetti machine. Now all I need is a 3D printed robot to crawl round the floor looking for those tiny parts that have made a bid for freedom.
  8. You can also highlight text in a previous post, and a highlighted option box *should* pop up to "Quote selection". Like a lot of things that should just work, this can sometimes be a bit hit and miss, so try selecting the text again if it doesn't work the first time. See the example below. Just to avoid confusion, the above is an image, so it generally wont work if you try to select part of an image, but will work if you select text. Try highlighting this BOLD text to see what I mean.
  9. Do we know what the dial is made of? If it is aluminium, then soldering might not be an option.
  10. Unknown date Timex. Probably a Marlin. Looks late 60s or very early 70s. No case back, chrome has seen better days, missing watch band and pin, and evidence of rust in the works. What's not to love about it. Oh.. "The price?" you ask.. £0.99p
  11. There are also UV cure epoxies. Examples here.. https://www.epoxies.com/products/uv-curable-illumabond/ Most of these glues can be found on ebay etc.
  12. UV cure glue, also known as Loca glue, or even UV cure nail polish would be my suggestion. The advantage of these glues, is they stay liquid till hit with a UV curing lamp, so if you use too much, or for example fill the tube by mistake, you can remove the excess, check you have it right, *then* hit it with the UV torch.
  13. It has been a bit of a busy couple of weeks recently, but I have managed to find a little spare time to fix a few things. A couple of other watches distracted me from the USSR's finest mechanical marvels in the previous post. Here are four recent 404 faces to keep you amused while you wait for me to get back to the Secondas. Most of the repairs were minor. The Timex requiring nothing more than a full service. The Orion on the other hand, is a jigsaw of left over BFG 866 parts salvaged from my junk pile. It runs surprisingly well considering its somewhat random origins. Not quite COSC, but certainly within the +/- 15 seconds per day range. Currently, fully wound it is sitting within about 4 second of keeping pace with the Pulsar kinetic that also distracted be from the Russian junk pile. Whether it will keep up this sterling performance remains to be seen, but I'm pretty confident it will.
  14. For the record "Orion" in this instance is probably a "Basis" watch brand. The name seems to have been around for a long time, with a few possible origins, but it looks like it ended its days in the 1980s having been sold to/acquired by "Basis", presumably after the demise of Fabrique de Montres Orion SA / Brandt & Hofmann, or whichever one of the other Orion related entities owned the name prior to that. This is conjecture on my part though, based on the info here -> http://www.mikrolisk.de/show.php?site=280&suchwort=Orion ... coupled with the low cost nature of the BFG866 pin lever movement.
  15. ... and here it is half a day later. Things are settling down quite nicely. Bear in mind that other than cleaning the random bunch of BFG866 parts, and throwing them all together, I've done nothing else yet. No regulation or adjusting.
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