Jump to content

AndyHull

Member
  • Content Count

    1,721
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    43

AndyHull last won the day on February 17

AndyHull had the most liked content!

2 Followers

About AndyHull

  • Rank
    Distinguished Member

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. I wouldn't attempt this on a genuine Breitling without a lot of practice. Re-luming hands is possible, and most of the watch repair suppliers supply lume as either individual colours or a kit of colours, however the technique requires considerable skill and patience. You also need to remove the hands from the watch, as the lume is applied from the rear of the hands. If you do consider attempting this, even in light of what I have said, then at the very least, obtain a few cheap watches to practice on first. Also watch this lot, it gives a lot of context to the problem, and some good tips.
  2. This is the image in question I believe. If you are having trouble inserting images, you will get better results using the Insert other Media link in the bottom right of the editor window, then choose Insert image from URL.
  3. It seems I've hit a rich vein of vintage USSR strangeness....
  4. From the position of the balance etc., It looks like a variant of the skeletonized "Chinese Standard movement", and as such is not really worth much. There are several different versions of these movements, but they tend to have a similar layout, but different bridge configurations. Does the movement have any numbers stamped anywhere on it perhaps under the balance, or on the bridges that might help to identify it? Does it claim anywhere on the watch that it is Swiss Made? Franklin Mint -> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Franklin_Mint In my limited experience of their stuff, I would tactfully describe as perhaps slightly higher quality than Gerald Ratner might have been selling... maybe. Check for hallmarks, if there are none, then treat it as a good piece to improve your watch cleaning skills on, but little more.
  5. Just when I thought these designs couldn't get any more kitch, I discovered this little Raketa 2609 HA based beauty. To further add to the craziness of the design, it appears to be a 24hr movement.
  6. A 1974 Timex no less. I have a little blue dial petite from 1974 April 6 1974 Swedish pop group ABBA's song Waterloo wins the 1974 Eurovision Song Contest in Brighton, England, UK. August 8 1974 - U.S. President Richard Nixon announces his resignation on August 8, effective at noon on August 9.
  7. Lenin... no, not John, the other one. LeninVer1.0-30.100Centre1.79RoundRedStarsCreamBoldFont.svg
  8. If you have been following this discussion on radioactive lume, you might find this interesting. Something to bear in mind, most "radioactive" watches are mildly hazardous, if the lume particulate is allowed to escape in to the environment which is why the majority of watches produced today do not contain any radioactive material. There are a few exceptions that have tritium tubes, but they are mainly intended for military or dive use. The doses in normal use from wearing an old radium, Promethium or tritium lumed watch are almost too small to measure, however the devices in this video are actually a genuine radiation risk, all be it a relatively low one. If, on the other hand, you are looking for something to calibrate your Geiger counter with, then you might like this ebay search -> https://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/i.html?_odkw=Negative+Ion+powder&_sop=15&_osacat=0&_from=R40&_trksid=m570.l1313&_nkw=Negative+Ion+&_sacat=0 Buy at your own risk of course. The one I found most concerning was this. https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Pack-of-4-Energy-Armor-Negative-Ion-Sports-Hair-Bands-Providing-Natures-Ions/251469259674?epid=1388443313&hash=item3a8cbc639a:g:XK0AAOxyXzxTGcHK
  9. 19 Jewel version in cream. Attribution-ShareAlike CC BY-SA CheVer1.0-30.100Centre1.79RoundRedStarsCream.svg Quartz version. CheVer1.0-30.100Centre1.79RoundRedStarsCream.svg
  10. Given the relatively small size of the mainsprings, and the relative complexity of the associated gearing, and the large balance, I suspect that the most likely explanation is that they were looking for improved accuracy rather than run time. As you say it looks more like their aim was to reduce isochronism errors. Your freshly cleaned version seems to suggest that this might have been a successful engineering endevour. Compare with for example the double barrel Seiko spring drive. https://www.grand-seiko.com/us-en/special/sd20th_elegance/ "This same elite team of watchmakers now presents Caliber 9R02, a new movement that has two mainsprings set in parallel within a single barrel and uses the unique Torque Return System* to deliver a power reserve of 84 hours." In that particular caliber the setup of the two springs is some what different. I suspect the increased jewel count in the Seiko might be put to a somewhat more productive use too. Although the Seiko is arguably not fundamentally that much more accurate. "A new Spring Drive caliber, 9R31, which has the same dual mainspring structure as 9R02 and the same high precision rate of one second a day and delivers a power reserve of 72 hours."
  11. From that post, I see you discovered a little more about the dual mainsprings. I must admit I simply assumed it was for longer running times, but what you say makes perfect sense.
  12. Sorry for the confusion, the Slava automatic 2427 date version is here. http://www.ranfft.de/cgi-bin/bidfun-db.cgi?10&ranfft&&2uswk&Slava_2427 The movement "family" consists of the following. 2414: manual wind, date (As seen in that square faced Sekonda). 2416: automatic, date 2427: automatic, day, date (I have four of these in various states of disrepair awaiting an hour or two of spare time, and a couple of working watches all from a scrap pile I picked up as a job lot). 2428: manual wind, day, date 2429: manual wind, no second, day, date They are pretty similar in their construction, with this strange collection of levers and cams to operate the keyless work and the quick set on the dated versions. If you pull the stem out in the wrong position, things are inclined to jump all over the place. Likewise if you strip down the keyless work and the quickset, you would be advised to take pictures as you go, as it will save a lot of head scratching. Also be aware, those springs and levers have only one ambition in life, and that is to become airborne. This link might also be of interest as it shows a full service of a day/date version. -> https://thewatchbloke.co.uk/2015/07/03/sekonda-slava-2427/
  13. You've just given me an idea for the source of another USSR themed dial design. I wonder how easy it would be to convert coin faces to monochrome SVG.. only one way to find out.
  14. Once in a while I bid on things with little expectation of winning, but by bidding, you do see the "You didn't win" message showing what the thing goes for. This new potential 404 club member was one such auction which surprised me as I actually won. Normally anything "jump hour" related goes for way more than the club rules allow. Chromatic to me means something completely different. Something more like this.
×
×
  • Create New...