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Today.... My 1940's Heuer Ref 347. Rugged looking watch with its battle scared dial. It has a Valjoux 22 under the hood. It's quite a large case for the time which gives it more of a contemporary

My 1961 Omega Constellation. Hard to believe its 60 years old. I don't think the Omega bracelet is correct . I believe these types came out in 62'. Doesn't matter since I like these more squared grain

1919 Burlington by Vortic Watch CO. USA

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11 hours ago, GomBoo said:

  ^

TETO

They Eat Their Own? ? Oh.. to each their own...

image.png.f174a4a10dfd86505bfa1d2f17c83040.png

... well if you think that thing is off the wall, I'm sure I have some much, much odder stuff.

Maybe I should start a separate thread for the most off the wall watches.

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Just now, AndyHull said:

They Eat Their Own? ? Oh.. to each their own...

image.png.f174a4a10dfd86505bfa1d2f17c83040.png

... well if you think that thing is off the wall, I'm sure I have some much, much odder stuff.

Maybe I should start a separate thread for the most off the wall watches.

I second the motion that you should start an "off the wall watches" thread.

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RIMG0921.thumb.JPG.78daf41de404e5fab1143114a80f9748.JPG

You've set "off the wall" bar pretty high there. Here's a ... well I'm not actually sure what it is to be perfectly honest... but it is what it is.

 

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Orient Star 'Explorient'. Any ideas for the date of this watch? Movement 48748, case ER0T C0 CS. This watch is 36mm diameter and has the latest version of the Orient Star logo so I'm thinking not that old. Any Orient experts out there?

IMG_20210418_220753053_HDR.jpg

IMG_20210418_220818417_HDR.jpg

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 I really like the 1940's art deco style but it's hard to find a large case. This one is unusual in that it's 28mm. 

It's one of my top 3 & I probably wear it as much as my black strap watch because oxblood goes with almost everything.

thumbnailzdgg.thumb.jpg.0f2577fb9efd3b2b9049d15b275803b0.jpg

Edited by SuspectDevice
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On 1/14/2021 at 8:42 PM, Poljot said:

Now it's back where it belongs to.

M - Copy.JPG

I love this. I had a similar pallet fork in a 137 year old Elgin I’ve been working on...

 

 

4EA97FCC-74BD-4795-B1D0-AC7CB1EB5820.jpeg

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Posted (edited)

Well it certainly isn't shy about letting you know it is ticking.

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Its actually not too bad (for a 1967 Timex mechanical).

Not exactly COSC, but not bad, given that it is a slightly agricultural bit of 1960s technology, which almost certainly has only been serviced once in its lifetime since it left the Dundee factory all those years ago. Its seems to have survived my servicing reasonably well too, since it is still going strong more than two years later.

Edited by AndyHull
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Thought I'd show the watch I've been wearing for the last few weeks, picked it up and gave it a bit of a clean and a strap I had and so far it's keeping great time can't find any info online about the make though ☹️ (if anyone knows anything I'd be happy to know)

Tried taking the scratches out of the crystal with polywatch but no joy so that might have to be replaced.

 

 

IMG_20210509_080345.jpg

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9 hours ago, Rabtmac said:

Tried taking the scratches out of the crystal with polywatch

Did you hit it with sandpaper first?

For this one, I would work it over with 800 grit (or maybe 600) and then follow up with 2000.  Then polywatch.

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Posted (edited)

@@@@@@@@.thumb.jpg.6c88ec481d9e77ebf16864d1394c9ec3.jpg

This is my next amateur horology victim.

It has been apart twice and I'm still having problems. Maybe the 3rd time will be a charm.

I found a chipped jewel the 1st time & fixed that. The 2nd time was a new mainspring (ETA 900 you have to lift out the train bridge instead of just popping the barrel out)

Anyway...I still like the art deco watches and they apparently call this one a "bottle cap" (Bulova made a bottle cap also)

 

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2 hours ago, LittleWatchShop said:

Did you hit it with sandpaper first?

For this one, I would work it over with 800 grit (or maybe 600) and then follow up with 2000.  Then polywatch.

The thought of taking sandpaper to a crystal is terrifying

I know it would work but it's still terrifying

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10 minutes ago, Rabtmac said:

The thought of taking sandpaper to a crystal is terrifying

isn't just the sandpaper, you have to use a rotary tool also. Unless you want to spend 4 or 5 hours at it and end with sore arms.

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2 hours ago, Rabtmac said:

The thought of taking sandpaper to a crystal is terrifying

I know it would work but it's still terrifying

With a crystal like that I would start with a small piece (1"x1") of 180 grit wet & dry working under a running tap, then work up through 400, 800, 1500, and 2500, all under running water. Then polish with Solvol AutoSol. Maybe 10 minutes max start to finish and will look like new. 

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On 5/9/2021 at 11:33 PM, Marc said:

With a crystal like that I would start with a small piece (1"x1") of 180 grit wet & dry working under a running tap, then work up through 400, 800, 1500, and 2500, all under running water. Then polish with Solvol AutoSol. Maybe 10 minutes max start to finish and will look like new. 

If that is about a plastic crystal most of the time sandpaper is not needed, abrasive compound works good. 

Even for mineral glass in my experience of doing many I have found that stepping through so many grades of paper is a waste of time and money, two grades plus diamond paste are enough.

Full topic 

 

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