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So I got myself a sorry-state russian microscope (4x-100x) (I believe it's been dropped, so I fixed the broken stand, I cleaned it and I aligned the glass prisms the best I could - work in progress). For more details on the microscope model, checkout http://microscope.modelengines.info/.

Samples below. The pictures are taken with a phone by putting it on an eyepiece. The subject is a beat-up balance wheel from a Poljot 2209. Looking through the microscope, the image is clearer, with better contrast and, most important, stereoscopic.

 

 

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Thank you,

Bogdan

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Hello Everyone, I am going to share the details of my adventure with a trinocular stereo microscope and a digital camera attached to it. I bought a second hand AmScope SM-1T (1st purchase) and I

Hi Lee, That looks like a nice piece of kit, albeit somewhat over specified. I have been using a Wild Heergrugg M5 now for about 4 years courtesy of an amazing car boot sale find and I wouldn't be

Cant get enough of my scope. its transformed my life!

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I've had one of these microscopes for quite a while I bought it second hand as a kit with 3 sets of eye pieces. I paid £65.00 for it off ebay they are built like a tank. The russian objectives are very good on these microscopes well worth seeking out as a cheap stereo microscope.

The only draw back is that the standard lens has only about 90mm working distance below it, I am trying to source a reasonably priced 190mm as this would give a much greater working distance.

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What is the working distance at the maximum magnification?


Maximum magnification you are only mm from the object, however, you can easily have it up 2 inches and you are still pretty close. You could use it to project on a computer and then operate on the patient (watch).


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What do you use to clean the lens? I read somewhere that ether70%/IPA 30% mix would do.

Also, I was searching for a service manual, but I think there isn't anything out there. I am having some problems with the rack/pinion assesmbly - it's a bit too loose.

 

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I use Lidl lens cleaning wipes that come in a pack of 100 these are alchol impregnated wipes.

The tension on the rack and pinion is adjustable via the knob on the right hand side,this is a instruction/maintence manual I found online,

http://www.lzos.ru/en/pdf/MBS-10_manual.pdf

I did take mine apart to clean and regrease it as all the old grease had hardend

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When you take it apart it becomes fairly obvious where the old grease is it will have  hardend so clean it off, mainly on the threads of the friction adjustment and on the rack. The only grease I had at the time was a grease I use for my mountain bike gears so I used that.I did this about two years ago and its still silky smooth on the focus adjustment.

The only other thing I have done is replace the light with a L.E.D one the old one being a tungsten light powered by a transforner the size of a electricity sub station ran very hot, I dont know how good russian electrics are but I got the distinct impression that the best place for this was the bin.

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first of all: HA HA!! nice one with electricity sub-station :)) True....

I am waiting for a cheap chinese 144 LED microscope Lamp myself to replace the "Heater", but I am a bit skeptical about it being as strong as the original light.

About the rack/pinion, I wasn't referring to the rack/pinion itself but more at the pinion axle and the knobs at it's end. Those are slipping, meaning the knobs are slipping on the axle - so I am thinking maybe I put too much grease and in the wrong places. 


So to reiterate the question: where did you grease the pinion axle? For example: did you grease the washers near the knob? How about the wood piece that resembles a champagne cork material?

Sorry if it's a dumb question. When I disassembled the thing, there was hardened grease everywhere. Also I struggled about 2 hours (from 2AM to 4 AM) because when I replaced the flange form the left side (from the rack-pinion assembly, the one that is fixed in 3 screws), I put it upside down - so the pinion didn't slide smoothly on the rack. Dumb, dumb, dumb....

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No just grease the axle. I think the wood piece is some kind of hardend leather in mine I did not put any grease on, thats what provides the resistance to stop the focus being too loose and moving from the weight of the head. If the knobs are slipping on the axle have you tightend the two nuts that hold the knobs to the axle enough I know they where a pain to do being so far down in the knob.

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I have now cobbled together a eyepiece adapter for my MBC made from a old canon extension tube and a turned aluminium tube that fits over the eyepiece.

Using it I have found the 8x eyepiece to be optically better than the 14x at low magnifications the fall off around the edges is very pronounced with only the central portion of the frame sharp as in the example below1_zpsalbllgnn.jpg

 

But this improves as the magnification increases,

2_zpspy5dtyur.jpg

Contrast and sharpness are good Russian optics have always been good, having taken a lot of equipment and manufacturing facilties when germany was split after the war, but there is no depth of field to speak of so focus is very shallow in all these pic I have focused on the top of the centre wheel pinion,

3_zpswqsdllbd.jpg

The scratches on the top of the pinion are pin sharp but focus falls off on the screw heads,

4_zps7mkinpbn.jpg

5_zpspxwxi8vm.jpg

 

6_zpsusdyxdaq.jpg

 

 

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Hi,

This is the set up I have attached a cheap L.E.D ring flash on to the lens this was bought very cheaply off Ebay for £10.00 including postage it can be used as a flash or a constant light source and comes with a number of adapters to fit various lenses.

The eyepiece adapter is a old Canon fit cheap chinese extension tube with a aluminium tube attached which fits directley over any one of the eyepieces.

These adapters can be bought ready made off Ebay for various D-SLR cameras or compact cameras.DSC_1079_zpsmrorjmri.jpg

Edited by wls1971
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  • 3 weeks later...
8 hours ago, winchman said:

I looked at these on Ebay but would it work on a Mac? No mention in system requirements?

Dont know but yesterday i have found the perfect app to use this camera with. It is the NCH Debut software.

I have tried Media Player HC, VLC, Youcam, free2xcam and even WIndows Movie Maker ... all had some issues, random but great picture delay which made lathe work hard, no fullscreen...  Even a simple picture was sometimes a headache. But this Debut seem perfect so far.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Been after one of these for a while, but wanted to try before I bought. Had the chance at a motorsport show I was at for work this week. Have to say, I'm very impressed.

This is the unit

http://www.oasisscientific.com/2mp-usb-digital-microscope-12mm-with-new-stand.html

Which I got on a show special for $70.

And here are a couple of sample pics.

So far very happy, it has a great working range and also connects to my phone, making it practical to use to work under (fliping the phone upside down means everything moves the way you expect it too)

S20161212_0001.jpg

S20161212_0002.jpg

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14 hours ago, vinn3 said:

good show ! so;  do you just plug this into your computer and take a photo?   F.M. (magic) 

Yup, pretty much, I'm using a free bit of software called Plugable Digital Viewer which the manufacturer recomended. There are other options for the scope as well, they did one that cleverely combined multiple images to give more depth of field but it was a bit more cash.

It is the first time I have actually been able to see side play on pinions etc. Looking forward to spotting dirt after cleaning movements that under a loupe look clean!

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