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Lee

Stereo Microscope

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I use a standard but modified pine desk which is painted white and covered in white vinyl, an adjustable stool which gives me just the right height. The movement or movement holder would be about 22cm from the front edge of the desk which is lipped at the front to catch  (most) airborne springs and screws. I can work for hours without back or eye strain but whatever arrangement you have I think regular breaks are important

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After VAT, shipping, and the Pound to USD exchange rate it became cost prohibitive.

I ordered an Amscope SE-400-Z instead. 10X and 20X pairs with X1 objective. I also won’t have to buy a voltage converter.

I hope it works just as well as the Brunel BM-1.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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I use an Carl Zeiss Stemi DV4 Stereo Microscope to inspect the jewels with, before I used it as one is supposed to but nowadays I have become a bit lazy and put a cheap USB camera on the ocular. Took me 22 minutes to make it with a 3D printer.
One can get quite a nice picture on a computer screen with a setup like that and even take one odd picture on for example a cap jewel.

USB_Zeiss.jpg

Stemi DV4.jpg

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5 hours ago, mlfloyd1 said:

Elevation speaking, when working on watches should the microscope be used on top of the watch bench or on top of a standard desk?

I would guess that depends on how long you work by the microscope. At a labaratory one mostly costum fit the microscope to fit your hight and so on. I use a standard desk but have an adjustable chair instead.


Some of our yonger personel even likes to stand on a ergonomic rubber matt instead of sitting.
Here is some instructions from Leica about the matter.

 

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Reading this thread has me really wanting a stereo microscope.  I'm just a watch hobbyist, but I also do quite a bit of work on smallish firearm assemblies.  I've been looking at scopes like some of the 10-20x ones on Ebay for over a year now.  There is one that gives an 8" working area, which seems like it would be adequate.  Some times, even when using a loop I will bump my screwdriver hand with the loop. A little separation seems like it would be a nice thing.

From this thread, it sounds like the 10x power is the most utilized?

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On 1/22/2015 at 5:42 AM, Marc said:

I don't usually use my microscope in general disassembly or reassembly; for that I use a clip on magnifier attached to my glasses that has a lens for each eye so I retain stereo vision.

The microscope comes into its own for inspection, oiling, and hairspring work, where the higher magnification really makes a difference. It's also great for detailed cleaning and restoration on dials partly because of the magnification but also peering down a microscope cuts out all of the peripheral distractions so your total focus is on the job in hand.

 

I do use a conventional loupe as well but that tends to be for inspection only as I find working without the ability to properly judge distance is less than ideal. Also, I work at desk height rather than bench height (something that I have to sort out as it's not so good for my back) which means that I am above the work, where the screw drivers need to be, so higher magnification loupes (with correspondingly closer working distances) are less than practical. As and when I eventually get a bench sorted out loupes may become a more viable proposition. What I have in mind is to have the working surface more or less at shoulder height when I am sitting upright. This would place the work in front of my eyes not below so there would be no competition for space with tools.

I'm glad that I continued reading this thread. I almost bought a stereo microscope for general disassembly And reassembly work. So then can you give me more information on your clip on magnifiers? I now use a loupe but would rater have stereo and a bigger field of view. Thanks for saving me some big bucks.. 

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@martygene at the time I made that post I was using a 3x clip on magnifier by Eschenbach same as this . Not the cheapest available at about £45 to £55 but very good. They have become a little scuffed since then but do still get used occasionally.

P1080319.thumb.JPG.e0713ddc3942b74dc438b67566b34999.JPG

The biggest issue I have with them is that my spectacle lenses partially counter the magnification.

I have since acquired a vintage Binomag head set.

P1080316.thumb.JPG.3c03d6ba59d07b62b32bed3edeffc009.JPG

P1080317.thumb.JPG.9de7d40ea86966f7ffe0bcb73cbc10d1.JPG

These can be picked up off eBay for between £15 - £25, the lenses are glass so don't scratch too easily, and are very comfortable to use. These are also about 3X mag but because I can use them without my specs I get the full benefit.

Working distance for both the Binomags and the Eschenbachs is about 100mm (4") and width of field about 8cm (a little less with the Eschenbachs).

I now also work at a bench the top of which is at upper chest height when I'm seated so posture issues are a thing of the past too.

My microscopes sit on a desk next to the bench so they are also at a much more useable height.

 

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Hi there

this is my first post here other than on the introductory board.

I have a Swift 10" working distance binocular microscope. I don't know how I managed without it previously. A while back I bought a camera module which fits in place of one eyepiece. Utterly useless. It gave enormous magnification, quite inappropriate for the tasks in hand, combined with appalling resolution (only using a small part of the sensor I assume) and jittery refresh. It would be very useful to have a camera module that replicates the FOV of the microscope itself. I would have thought that someone would have produced one of these given the widespread use of these Swift devices - even if it required the inclusion of some relay optics in the camera module.

Anyone found such a device?

Roy

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