Jump to content

Introduce Yourself Here

New to the community? We like to know who we are chatting with :)
So why not introduce yourself here first!

1,457 topics in this forum

    • 3 replies
    • 219 views
    • 2 replies
    • 247 views
  1. Hello all..

    • 2 replies
    • 254 views
    • 2 replies
    • 245 views
    • 1 reply
    • 226 views
    • 11 replies
    • 490 views
  2. Brad R

    • 1 reply
    • 238 views
    • 3 replies
    • 333 views
    • 2 replies
    • 279 views
    • 1 reply
    • 272 views
    • 4 replies
    • 303 views
    • 3 replies
    • 280 views
    • 1 reply
    • 257 views
    • 10 replies
    • 384 views
    • 9 replies
    • 349 views
    • 0 replies
    • 242 views
  3. Hello All !

    • 0 replies
    • 200 views
  4. Hello

    • 1 reply
    • 224 views
    • 3 replies
    • 272 views
    • 9 replies
    • 326 views
    • 5 replies
    • 401 views
  5. Hello

    • 1 reply
    • 358 views
    • 0 replies
    • 261 views
  6. Hi

    • 3 replies
    • 270 views
    • 3 replies
    • 289 views
  • Recent Topics

  • Posts

    • Well that question got me googling... There is a lot of discussion about this on the ”interweb”, but mostly in relation to woodworking and nail polish! Shellac is a natural product, subjected to various purification processes prior to sale which have changed significantly over the years, so firstly, the shellac we buy today is likely to be much purer and more consistent than in the past. Shellac flakes sold for making wood finishes definitely deteriorate with age. After a period of time the can no longer be dissolved in alcohol. I haven’t found out exactly why, but moisture, heat and light are all cited as causes. So, keeping your flakes in a sealed dark container would be a good thing. Shellac in stick form will have a lower surface area for a given volume and therefore certainly less susceptible to moisture. Once mixed with alcohol, shellac will start to react chemically, (search for esterification if you want to know more), and evaporation of the alcohol doesn’t get you back to where you started. This is why pre-mixed shellac varnishes have a short shelf life. Shellac is chemically similar to acrylic, and hence made of long polymer chains. I’ve read conflicting information about whether these will cross-link in ultraviolet light (the process that causes unbreakable watch crystals to go yellow and brittle). However, I would expect it to behave in a similar way - again, this is a non reversible reaction. All of this may go some way to explain why some people reprt there is no problem with cleaning pallets in alcohol and others saying it softens the shellac. I’m now into this deep enough to need a good chemist to get me back out. Any volunteers?  
    • This is asked very often. Especially when you have no experience it would be good to use a caseback opener, a good model below.. And then you need a case press to close it.   Skip on that and you have good chances to scratch or otherwise damage it it. So, all in all, it can be more expeditious to bring it to the watch shop.  
    • I picked this up on Ebay and love the design, but failed to spot the mark around the 2 o'clock marker. The same issue looks to be starting at 3 o'clock. Can anyone suggest what the problem might be, and the best way to tackle it?   Link for higher resolution - http://imgur.com/a/kebkfaP   Thank you!   Sent from my SM-G970U1 using Tapatalk        
    • Hi everyone, Was going to replace my wife's watch battery, a Tissot T10. Model T073310 The back cover doesn't have any notch or tab to pry it off? I've attach some pics. Thanks heaps!  
×
×
  • Create New...