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    This will help me consolidate all my videos under one roof rather than maintaining two separate systems, and it will also help clean up WRT a bit.

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  1. Singing Bird Cage - restoration

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  • Recent Topics

  • Posts

    • If you intend to work on PWs only, you will surely need no winders for ladies WW. You could get a coarse idea of the needed winder sizes if you take half of the movement diameter minus 20%. Frank
    • Hiya, Thank you for the offer!!! I don’t have a specific spring I’m working on now. I’ve been buying the supplies and equipment I need and have picked up a few pocket watches to take apart, clean, and put together. Some are missing parts. Once i start taking them apart I’ll definitely be posting pics and reaching out Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    • Yes, I don't think they've been made for some time and any offered as new were/are remains of old stock. There was a time even in the 70s as mechanical watches were heading toward supposed extinction that women churned out piecework of vibrated springs matched to balances from home. They'd have a Greiner Spiromatic and some killer tweezers and do this stuff at a speed and precision that's unbelievable. I'm almost sure the lady I met at Parmigiani from the post above was one of these workers, pulled in from semiretirement. There's no demand for such tools now and there's enough on the used market to satisfy the collectors and occasional users. My set has been updated numerous times in the last 20 years as I found better examples to replace the ones I had, selling off the lesser pieces. Being in Switzerland we're a bit spoiled as you stumble upon this stuff at random flea markets. I found a selection of screw slotting files a few months back, really fine ones they don't make anymore, for two bucks a piece, new old stock.
    • Save your money, the tweezers in the hswalsh link is of little use. OH did a very good job finding this tool, but it is the smallest of the set, too small for gents- or pocketwatches. I suppose it is the remains of a long sold stock. My old Bergeon catalog shows them, but they were no more available when the catalog was issued. Frank
    • That should work fine. If you do 2-3 rinses in distilled water a very quick rinse in isopropyl alcohol will have no effect on the shellac on the fork (like 30-60 seconds). The isopropyl will soak up the water and then dry quickly, with a warm air flow either from the cleaning machine, a separate dryer, or just a hair dryer. The warm air is a must to avoid condensation from the cooling effect of the evaporating alcohol.
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