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1 hour ago, LittleWatchShop said:

I have two of these.  Alway struck me odd that the "ocenographer" would look like a dress watch.  This one is from 1975

 

Bulova had Oceanographers rated for 333 feet and 666 feet. The 333 feet rated watches tended to have a little more "flash" to them compared to their 666 rated watches. I recently serviced this Oceanographer and am putting a not very water friendly leather rally strap on it 🙂

oceanred.jpg.73f2a0bbd80ad778cd65168d4ef1f838.jpg

 

 

 

BTW, yours looks to be the model 11640-OW/Y. 

 

11640.thumb.png.cf83b24eaac09867113bd9e79cba71d6.png

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6 hours ago, Neverenoughwatches said:

learn from

The problem is do people grasped what they need to learn to avoid the problem?

6 hours ago, Neverenoughwatches said:

We as newbies, beginnners and amateurs beat ourselves up too much with this, we are not professional watchmakers, we didnt attend some years at watchmaking school or have decades of experience under our belts. It is what it is, we make mistakes plenty of them.

What makes you think going to a professional school would help with this? When I went to my second watch repair school everybody there was supposed to have completed an accredited school. But my amusement was that all the schools were teaching watch repair differently everybody had differing knowledge and skills because there wasn't any kind of a standard for which they were teaching to. Then even with standards there's still missing a lot of knowledge that's needed to repair watches.

Sometimes the best people at repairing watches are not the professional watchmakers. That's because you don't have customers screaming because they want their watch yesterday. You can take your time you can look at the problem and if you're capable of learning by researching and figuring out what the problem is conceivably you can be better than the professionals. It's amazing all the silly mistakes I've seen professionals make that they shouldn't be.

6 hours ago, Neverenoughwatches said:

There is a positive for every negative, we tend to overlook that and concentrate on the minor setback.

Yes all of us need to do that. The positive of when the watch runs whenever that may be if that ever happens. Yes I have a bad attitude I work on vintage watches and their a pain in the ass and they don't always run. I can't give anyone a timeframe of when they're going to be finished. I can't guarantee that they're going to run ever. They may be worn out which is unacceptable to customers who don't understand that. So yes we need to embrace the positive wherever it may be lurking. Just unfortunately not necessarily in the watch were trying to work on.

 

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Enjoyed bringing this one back to life for a (female) friend. 

Not my personal style, but it has a pretty mother-of-pearl dial. Very hard to photograph the shimmers. 

It was her early adulthood watch and it had stopped working decades ago. If fact, it was actually still running, but the crown was completely stuck due to water damage and rust. So it wasn't usable / couldn't set the time. 

Fortunately, the rust was only in the keyless works and relatively easy to clean off (after struggling for quite a while to get the crown/stem out ). 

The Cupillard cal 233 is running really well now. 

Now:

20230621_213600.thumb.jpg.7e60c69a27c933adbc2c0b033fdfa543.jpg

Before:20230520_225359.thumb.jpg.6f44e08d93410a2e27eff740cace56c2.jpg20230520_232408.thumb.jpg.ceb9dc296a8c860895c98df3243306bb.jpg

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1 hour ago, JohnR725 said:

The problem is do people grasped what they need to learn to avoid the problem?

What makes you think going to a professional school would help with this? When I went to my second watch repair school everybody there was supposed to have completed an accredited school. But my amusement was that all the schools were teaching watch repair differently everybody had differing knowledge and skills because there wasn't any kind of a standard for which they were teaching to. Then even with standards there's still missing a lot of knowledge that's needed to repair watches.

Sometimes the best people at repairing watches are not the professional watchmakers. That's because you don't have customers screaming because they want their watch yesterday. You can take your time you can look at the problem and if you're capable of learning by researching and figuring out what the problem is conceivably you can be better than the professionals. It's amazing all the silly mistakes I've seen professionals make that they shouldn't be.

Yes all of us need to do that. The positive of when the watch runs whenever that may be if that ever happens. Yes I have a bad attitude I work on vintage watches and their a pain in the ass and they don't always run. I can't give anyone a timeframe of when they're going to be finished. I can't guarantee that they're going to run ever. They may be worn out which is unacceptable to customers who don't understand that. So yes we need to embrace the positive wherever it may be lurking. Just unfortunately not necessarily in the watch were trying to work on.

 

Yes i understand that, some budding beginners will turn into amateurs that are better than professionals if they have an aptitude for watchrepair. Qualifications aren't everything and natural ability counts for much more. You have a tough job John by the sound of it, many of us here envy your knowledge and skill. I hope you are happy at work, working for an employer isn't easy, its something i could never do. 

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13 hours ago, Neverenoughwatches said:

Second time around the pride of repairing it yet again will outweigh and disappointment felt.

I am certain the pride will outweigh the disappointment the first time the repair happens the second time around 😳

6 hours ago, Knebo said:

The Cupillard cal 233 is running really well now

Well done with such a small movement- not a lot of lignes to work with.

- and a very interesting watch and movement. That detail is like fish scales- very unique…

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5 hours ago, rehajm said:

ell done with such a small movement- not a lot of lignes to work with.

- and a very interesting watch and movement. That detail is like fish scales- very unique…

Thanks!

Fortunately (or unfortunately), I'm used to servicing ladies watches for my (very few) paying clients. The Cupillard 233 with 23mm diameter was therefore rather easy going compared to my recent Omega 244 experience (oval/rectangular 13.5x17.5mm). 

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32 minutes ago, broccolini said:

I love 70's watches. I have your watch's cousin.

 

 

70's.jpg

Yeah, my collecting interests are mainly 1970's watches. So many different designs from that era. I can see whey this particular design isn't for everyone, it's pretty out there.

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3 hours ago, broccolini said:

These are all my 70's watches. I think. Might be more.

So much flair. 😉

 

IMG_0479.jpg

Nice! I dig those two bottom Elgin's on the left. In fact, I think you outbid me (May 22nd?) on the bottom one 🙂 I have the blue accent version of that one.

Elgin333.thumb.jpg.20c59d875fdff9f5eff377a45aadc18d.jpg

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I picked this Black dial 1967 manual waterproof Caravelle up in a lot for $13.20. It sat in my drawer for a few months not working and one of the other watches in the lot had my attention. Found it last night and took off the balance and fiddled with it a bit. Put it back together added a $2.75 new acrylic and a $4 forest green nato strap. Not bad for $19.95 US. Needs a crown and a general servicing, but the dial is sweet. Is a 7 jewel Japan movement that is a bit erratic on the timegrapher, but is only about 1 minute fast after setting and 10 hours wind.DSCN53052.thumb.JPG.f12d5009884f42388e29d4711e7d4782.JPGDSCN53062.thumb.JPG.657630c7fd2244a1a54711631d8e1ac3.JPG20230628_0644302.thumb.jpg.e2cb83814b50bb8317b08c4aba36b810.jpg

Edited by Razz
Changed slow to fast.
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7 hours ago, Razz said:

I picked this Black dial 1967 manual waterproof Caravelle up in a lot for $13.20. It sat in my drawer for a few months not working and one of the other watches in the lot had my attention. Found it last night and took off the balance and fiddled with it a bit. Put it back together added a $2.75 new acrylic and a $4 forest green nato strap. Not bad for $19.95 US. Needs a crown and a general servicing, but the dial is sweet. Is a 7 jewel Japan movement that is a bit erratic on the timegrapher, but is only about 1 minute fast after setting and 10 hours wind.DSCN53052.thumb.JPG.f12d5009884f42388e29d4711e7d4782.JPGDSCN53062.thumb.JPG.657630c7fd2244a1a54711631d8e1ac3.JPG20230628_0644302.thumb.jpg.e2cb83814b50bb8317b08c4aba36b810.jpg

Another shot with a slightly less worn crown. This one is signed and I can gain better purchase for winding. Hard to see but I like the wet dial look, at the base of the hour numbers you can see it a bit.DSCN53102.thumb.JPG.79e79f24c8de71b68a8d7f6f1ee54971.JPG

Also got a shot of the movement while swapping out the replacement crown/stem (yes I had another non runner with the same movement and case size apparently).DSCN53072.thumb.JPG.4f4b6f81930e783477797bc99f78b2fe.JPG

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6 minutes ago, ManSkirtBrew said:

I have to say, I know these Caravelles were the lower-end line, but I have one and love it. I wear it all the time.

I agree, especially the 17 jewel version of the 11DP. I recommend that movement for people just starting out as it's an inexpensive solid movement, easy to service, with readily available parts. Just a couple of hours ago I was deciding on which watch to work on next and it was either a Caravelle or a Roamer. I started work on the Roamer but it needs a part so will probably start on the Caravelle tomorrow.

Edited by GuyMontag
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26 minutes ago, ManSkirtBrew said:

I have to say, I know these Caravelles were the lower-end line, but I have one and love it. I wear it all the time.

I agree I have a few and they are solid movements.

20 minutes ago, GuyMontag said:

I agree, especially the 17 jewel version of the 11DP. I recommend that movement for people just starting out as it's an inexpensive solid movement, easy to service, with readily available parts. Just a couple of hours ago I was deciding on which watch to work on next and it was either a Caravelle or a Roamer. I started work on the Roamer but it needs a part so will probably start on the Caravelle tomorrow.

I prefer the 17j versions as well. I have a couple of automatics made in West Germany that are nice. Great to work on and parts are easy to come by as needed.

Here is a 1960 (M0) with a nice white dial. The underside of the case is pitted likely from sweat. AS 1430 17j. Runs better, but still needs a service. Time to try my new short set (3) of mainspring winders and try to get  more amplitude.DSCN53152.thumb.JPG.6f0f529c4d913898689ef1d1b827b771.JPGDSCN53132.thumb.JPG.6efff27c81b7c584352bc1a78545a502.JPGDSCN53162.thumb.JPG.36183a8db614fd326ac88116f76e3118.JPGDSCN53122.thumb.JPG.1272f8f611ab0afa409f58d1e190d2c0.JPG20230628_1729482.thumb.jpg.d4f576350f7eb723f5aa1f814cc1f6df.jpg

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17 hours ago, Razz said:

I picked this Black dial 1967 manual waterproof Caravelle up in a lot for $13.20. It sat in my drawer for a few months not working and one of the other watches in the lot had my attention. Found it last night and took off the balance and fiddled with it a bit. Put it back together added a $2.75 new acrylic and a $4 forest green nato strap. Not bad for $19.95 US. Needs a crown and a general servicing, but the dial is sweet. Is a 7 jewel Japan movement that is a bit erratic on the timegrapher, but is only about 1 minute fast after setting and 10 hours wind.DSCN53052.thumb.JPG.f12d5009884f42388e29d4711e7d4782.JPGDSCN53062.thumb.JPG.657630c7fd2244a1a54711631d8e1ac3.JPG20230628_0644302.thumb.jpg.e2cb83814b50bb8317b08c4aba36b810.jpg

Very nice watch. Great combo with the Nato strap. 

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