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Just acquired my first vintage Timex quartz in the form of an original Falcon Eye. This one has one of the early quartz timed electro-mechanical movements in it. It was sold as a non-runner, hopefully it just needs a cleaning and a battery. I see these were prone to battery leakage, hopefully not this one. Overall it looks fairly decent. The gold finish has unfortunately been worn off the bracelet by some previous owners. Hopefully I'll be able to find a suitable replacement.

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312987513_s-l1600(20).thumb.jpg.49f5d9ba15ce02f64c9288a73ea95e11.jpg

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1718511364_s-l1600(19).thumb.jpg.6f025851e81c26f3cba47a5825c4f3e6.jpg

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More mechanical madness from the penny lots. In this case a job lot of 6 for bang on the 404 mark. 

s-l1600.jpg

s-l500.jpg

s-l1600.jpg

 

s-l500.jpg

Not bad as it includes a 1975 Timex, and yet another Ingersoll with a blue dial.

Oh and of course the "Siro" will hopefully have a high grade Oris pin lever in it. It would be nice to get that running.

Edited by AndyHull

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11 hours ago, AndyHull said:

.. and this one, which I was fairly certain wouldn't join the club, as they are usually very popular. 

s-l1600.jpg

Oddly, even though it is a non runner,  I was the only bidder, so the hammer fell at two and a half quid.

Shame this one's dial is a little the worse for wear, but at least it doesn't appear to have had backstreet facelift surgery in Mumbai, and I'm not a big fan of those faceted crystals, so the crystal might have to be replaced, but for the price, you can't really complain.

Ricoh automatics have an interesting mechanism.

"Straight lever (ligne angulaire), only one banking pin (Fig.4)
The principle is known from the Glashütte lever escapement. There the lever has a pin, and its motion is limited by a hole in the plate. Likely Ricoh has noticed that a hole is lighter than a pin, and therefore placed the hole in the lever."

Details here ->  http://www.ranfft.de/cgi-bin/bidfun-db.cgi?10&ranfft&&2uswk&Ricoh_Auto

Edited by AndyHull

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11 hours ago, AndyHull said:

Not bad as it includes a 1975 Timex, and yet another Ingersoll with a blue dial.

Oh and of course the "Siro" will hopefully have a high grade Oris pin lever in it. It would be nice to get that running.

Further possible trademark info from http://www.mikrolisk.de 

I've highlighted the most likely candidates.

Ramino Josmar Watch SA Bettlach, Schweiz; registriert am 3.12.1955

... and ...

Trafalgar Fortis SA Grenchen, Schweiz; registriert am 19.2.1957

Trafalgar Trafalgar Watch Co. Ltd. London, England; registriert am 5.1.1977             

Trafalgar (mit Mast / Fahne/Flagge) Al. Baume / Baume & Mercier Uhren, Uhrenteile; Les Bois und Genf, Schweiz; seit 1801; registriert am 20.11.1900

Trafalgar (mit Mast / Fahne/Flagge) Baume & Co. Uhren, Uhrenteile; La Chaux-de-Fonds, Schweiz; registriert am 25.6.1929

 

 

 

   

 

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On 2/10/2020 at 5:43 AM, FLwatchguy73 said:

Just acquired my first vintage Timex quartz in the form of an original Falcon Eye. This one has one of the early quartz timed electro-mechanical movements in it. It was sold as a non-runner, hopefully it just needs a cleaning and a battery. I see these were prone to battery leakage, hopefully not this one. Overall it looks fairly decent. The gold finish has unfortunately been worn off the bracelet by some previous owners. Hopefully I'll be able to find a suitable replacement.

1333176987_s-l1600(17).thumb.jpg.c94826515bcbc9b75ccb3d05188df002.jpg

312987513_s-l1600(20).thumb.jpg.49f5d9ba15ce02f64c9288a73ea95e11.jpg

398471071_s-l1600(18).thumb.jpg.730aa1552cad575c8588b242ce0faecc.jpg

1718511364_s-l1600(19).thumb.jpg.6f025851e81c26f3cba47a5825c4f3e6.jpg

 

20200214_135418.jpg

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2 More Timex quartz watches on their way to me. The first is slightly more modern and I believe has a more conventional stepper movement. There is a recessed pusher on this model, I assume it's to advance the date? The second has a quartz regulated electronic balance with a Day/Date feature similar to my Falcon Eye.

734715552_s-l1600(21).thumb.jpg.2d108cdd15cca46d4a51264e1f21ce18.jpg

here is that recessed date(?) pusher.

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Day/Date Quartz regulated electronic balance model

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I also purchased this vintage watch. It is made by the Pierce watch company. I got this one for 2 reasons, the first and most important, my youngest son is named Pierce. That alone is reason enough for me. Second reason is, I like the simple style of it. Pierce made a very nice Chronograph as well, If I can find one at a reasonable price, I'll grab one as well.

1736281347_s-l1600(24).thumb.jpg.8d2e575bfaac3bf3ec8cd44e03598d6d.jpg

 

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s-l1600.jpg

The twin of my COSC accurate USSR  2628 H 19 jewel TV dialed manual wind day date appeared on ebay, so I placed my usual humble bid and it is on its way.
 

s-l1600.jpg

I picked this up for even less. A similar era USSR Sekonda twin barreled square face with date.

s-l1600.jpg

And the final bit of madness was an LED Timex and an early LCD Trafalgar as a job lot.
I really only wanted the LED, but since they came in averaging £3.85 each, I figured what the heck.


I'm curious to know why the Trafalgar has the "T British Made T" logo, perhaps it has a tritium "backlight".

I'm sure a little more mild radioactivity around the place is not going to make much difference. :D

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No pictures inside thee two electronic watches, but the two Russian numbers look reasonable.

The first one is a rather fine Raketa 2628.h.AsPurchased3b.thumb.jpg.31ccd09f92e9e45d6b04f1a1334f2ecd.jpg

http://www.ranfft.de/cgi-bin/bidfun-db.cgi?10&ranfft&&2uswk&Raketa_2628_H

The other is a Slava 2414 twin barrel.

AsPurchased3b.png.c021bce97a84a6a2c39e0ed86f612e39.png

http://www.ranfft.de/cgi-bin/bidfun-db.cgi?10&ranfft&&2uswk&Slava_2414

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No you have two weak springs instead of one strong one. Like many Russian watch of that period it was a gimmick. I have repaired some  that are day/date, on the dial it says something like 30 jewel movement, remove the dial and you have a plate with jewels pressed in and there just for show, they do nothing. 

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4 hours ago, oldhippy said:

No you have two weak springs instead of one strong one. Like many Russian watch of that period it was a gimmick. I have repaired some  that are day/date, on the dial it says something like 30 jewel movement, remove the dial and you have a plate with jewels pressed in and there just for show, they do nothing. 

Of the two movements, I expect the Raketa 2628.h to be the better quality, and the better time keeper.

The supposed advantage of the two springs was longer run time, but in my experience, the advantage is minimal.

As to the 30 jewels, all of the twin barrel manual wind Slava movements I've encountered were 21 jewels. The Automatic version (which I got a job lot of for pennies a while back) however has a scattering of extraneous rocks, bringing the total to 27 and both the manual and automatic 24XX Slava versions are a bit of a pain to work with, as the keyless work will play tricks on you if you so much as look at it sideways.

The Raketa is much nicer.


This from Ranft gives you more details. 

Remarks
The mounting frame with parts of the date assembly is part of the calibre.
indirectly driven minute allows a very big balance
two barrels coupled in parallel use the remaining space most efficiently
automatic with two roller freewheels (Fg.4)
if 27 jewels: 5 hole jewels for horizontal guide of the date disc (Fig.5, A in fig.6) and 4 cap jewels for vertical guide (Fig.5, B in Fig.6)
Fig.5 shows likely the most complicated assembly ever to advance the date with a pusher.

Attention! Never, never ever unlock the stem unless you have pulled the crown to setting position. And never insert the stem without pushing the release button, even not if the collar towards the square is conical to lift the set lever. Else you have a high chance to mix up the parts of the setting works, and rearranging them is much more troublesome than in most other movements.

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Once in a while I bid on things with little expectation of winning, but by bidding, you do see the "You didn't win" message showing what the thing goes for.
AsPurchased1.jpg.c7e8c743cea4bd566e398528156764d1.jpg

This new potential 404 club member was one such auction which surprised me as I actually won.

Normally anything "jump hour" related goes for way more than the club rules allow.

 

Chromatic to me means something completely different.

RIMG0047.thumb.JPG.633fb7cc95dba0bc6e61d24c364c82bd.JPG

Something more like this.

 

 

Edited by AndyHull

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13 hours ago, AndyHull said:

automatic with two roller freewheels (Fg.4)
if 27 jewels: 5 hole jewels for horizontal guide of the date disc (Fig.5, A in fig.6) and 4 cap jewels for vertical guide (Fig.5, B in Fig.6)
Fig.5 shows likely the most complicated assembly ever to advance the date with a pusher.

Hi Andy, I followed your link to the Slava 2414, but I couldn't see this part of the text you quoted, and there are only two pictures. What am I missing? I wanted to see the complicated date mechanism.

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20 minutes ago, Klassiker said:

Hi Andy, I followed your link to the Slava 2414, but I couldn't see this part of the text you quoted, and there are only two pictures. What am I missing? I wanted to see the complicated date mechanism.

Sorry for the confusion, the Slava automatic 2427 date version is here.

http://www.ranfft.de/cgi-bin/bidfun-db.cgi?10&ranfft&&2uswk&Slava_2427

The movement "family" consists of the following.

2414: manual wind, date  (As seen in that square faced Sekonda).
2416: automatic, date 
2427: automatic, day, date  (I have four of these in various states of disrepair awaiting an hour or two of spare time, and a couple of working watches all from a scrap pile I picked up as a job lot).
2428: manual wind, day, date
2429: manual wind, no second, day, date

They are pretty similar in their construction, with this strange collection of levers and cams to operate the keyless work and the quick set on the dated versions. If you pull the stem out in the wrong position, things are inclined to jump all over the place. Likewise if you strip down the keyless work and the quickset, you would be advised to take pictures as you go, as it will save a lot of head scratching. 

Also be aware, those springs and levers have only one ambition in life, and that is to become airborne. :D

Slava_2428-2.jpg

This link might also be of interest as it shows a full service of a day/date version. -> https://thewatchbloke.co.uk/2015/07/03/sekonda-slava-2427/

Edited by AndyHull

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2 hours ago, AndyHull said:

This link might also be of interest as it shows a full service of a day/date version. -> https://thewatchbloke.co.uk/2015/07/03/sekonda-slava-2427/

I did a full resurrection on a 2428 which may also be of interest here....

https://www.watchrepairtalk.com/topic/5232-those-crazy-russians-my-1000th-post/?tab=comments#comment-53022

 

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57 minutes ago, Marc said:

did a full resurrection on a 2428 which may also be of interest here....

From that post, I see you discovered a little more about the dual mainsprings.

Quote

... The use of 2 main springs running in tandem allows for a more even torque delivery as the springs wind down which should  help to reduce isochronism errors, while also making good use of the available space. ...

I must admit I simply assumed it was for longer running times, but what you say makes perfect sense.

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3 minutes ago, AndyHull said:

I must admit I simply assumed it was for longer running times, but what you say makes perfect sense.

I thought pretty much the same to start with but the relatively small increase in power reserve (up to 47 hrs according to Ranfft) didn't seem to justify the increase in complexity of design and corresponding increase in manufacturing costs so I did a bit of thinking around the subject.

To be fair the conclusion I came to was in part speculation on my part, but it was also alluded to in a number of the articles that I read at the time, and it does make sense.

Another aspect to consider though is that using two small barrels instead of one larger barrel provides a different set of options regarding how you fit all of the bits into the limited real estate of the base plate, and this may also have been a consideration during the design process.

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Given the relatively small size of the mainsprings, and the relative complexity of the associated gearing, and the large balance,  I suspect that the most likely explanation is that they were looking for improved accuracy rather than run time. As you say it looks more like their aim was to reduce isochronism errors. Your freshly cleaned version seems to suggest that this might have been a successful engineering endevour.

Compare with for example the double barrel Seiko spring drive.

https://www.grand-seiko.com/us-en/special/sd20th_elegance/

image.png.a67a17b6898325354d3c19a0266916ab.png


"This same elite team of watchmakers now presents Caliber 9R02, a new movement that has two mainsprings set in parallel within a single barrel and uses the unique Torque Return System* to deliver a power reserve of 84 hours."

In that particular caliber the setup of the two springs is some what different. I suspect the increased jewel count in the Seiko might be put to a  somewhat more productive use too. 

Although the Seiko is arguably not fundamentally that much more accurate. 

"A new Spring Drive caliber, 9R31, which has the same dual mainspring structure as 9R02 and the same high precision rate of one second a day and delivers a power reserve of 72 hours."

 

 

Edited by AndyHull

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I found this on one of my vintage watch Facebook pages. Probably have to wait for ten days or so as I'm in the US and it's coming from the UK. That dial is amazing. I also love the gold hands and numbers with a silver case. I'm 73 and SHOULD stop collecting and start selling my collection as my daughter wants so that she doesn't have to deal with it but being addicted and all I can't stop.  Lol.. Plus I have many watches in a drawer in my watch work bench to be serviced. 

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