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Showing content with the highest reputation on 12/12/2018 in all areas

  1. 3 points
    AndyHull

    Watch of Today

    Maybe this is more to everyone's taste. It doesn't really count as my watch of the day though since it is still in transit, and in need of some TLC before I can wear it. On the plus side its not every day you get a watch named after you. Queue the 'I didn't know your name was "The Hatton"' .. quips. It easily blew my 404 budget I must confess.
  2. 2 points
    HSL

    Watch of Today

    Lagonda .. nice watch and a nice car .. A mellow yellow golden boy, Tissot Stylist from the mid 70's. Perfect for a Wednesday as this when it's dark in the morning going to work and dark in the evening coming from work... This one is powered by a Tissot 2541. Tick rate is around 21600 A/h.
  3. 1 point
    Yes, I'm "scared to dead" for that one too
  4. 1 point
    That dial is definitely one of Vostok's "coolest"! I need one of those in my life, just waiting for the right one to come by... Someone once said: "I'm afraid one day I will die and my wife will sell my watches for what I told her I paid for them."
  5. 1 point
    wls1971

    So is this really from 1850 era?

    You can join the NAWCC website forum and discuss clocks free of charge there are many people just like this site that would be happy to help you with your clock you dont have to be a paid up member of the NAWCC. And any new clock helps those members who are compiling a database of serial numbers The logo on your clock is of a style commonly used between 1914 to 1934 which is really the tail end of Gustav Becker production and encompasses the time when Junghans took control of the company, which is also the time serial numbers went awry and away from the linear numbering system used before, the backplate also has a letter M stamped on the right hand side this is significant and will also allow those in the know to determine the age of the clock. Junghans took control of GB in 1926 and serial numbers reset starting from number 1 on Westminster chime clock's and 400 day clocks so I would say your clock is a very early Junghans ownership period Westminster chime clock made at the Freiburg factory . Regarding the striking on your clock if you open the Bezel at the front check to see if there is a cut out along the edge of the dial with a little lever this will be the silent strike switch. The P14 number on the clock refers to the correct pendulum length to be used with the clock I think this is a metric measurement so would be a 14cm pendulum.. I hope this will help you with your clock.
  6. 1 point
    noirrac1j

    Watch of Today

    Day-Glo colors are always a good choice to keep things low key. J
  7. 1 point
    If I only for once would listen to myself !! Looks like it's getting X-mas My wife doesn't know yet X-mas surprise
  8. 1 point
    I would say yes (with a few other minor bits) and that I'd sure like to try....what a great collection. Are you a buyer for it? otoh, I'd say from a standing start, having that kit gives you a minuscule fraction of what's needed to make a watch. Developing the skills and knowledge of to be proficient at making the wide variety of parts needed, is at least 100x more difficult than acquiring the equipment. Being able to design and draw it all, 10-100x or more again? You may have some or all of that, but then I doubt you'd be asking the question. the good news is, that's where the fun, challenge and reward is: learning and figuring it out. With close to 30 years of making things in a home machine shop, I'd say the two polar ends of the continuum, buying the machines and having a finished item (model engines in my case but could be a watch) are almost a let down compared to the long, long bit in between, learning, design, developing craftsmanship etc. Its the striving that makes such a long venture compelling...vs going out this afternoon and buying a watch.
  9. 1 point
    clockboy

    So is this really from 1850 era?

    Lovely chime sound created by the four hammers. Very nice, very nice indeed.
  10. 1 point
    oldhippy

    So is this really from 1850 era?

    Could we please have a very close photo of the insignia on the back plate and all numbers? We are having a good discussion in deciding what date it comes from.
  11. 1 point
    wls1971

    So is this really from 1850 era?

    All four gongs are struck for the hour strike,
  12. 1 point
    clockboy

    So is this really from 1850 era?

    Thanks for the PDF oldhippy very useful. I have never come across a clock with two sets of hammers. I presume one set is for the hours and one set for the chimes.
  13. 1 point
    wls1971

    So is this really from 1850 era?

    Thanks for the pdf, its a incomplete list of logo variations based on know examples and information at the time, there is a more up to date version circulating on the NAWCC forums that has 17 variations of Gustav Becker trademark from 1852 to 1940(Becker closed in the 1930's but Junghans used up remaining stock until 1940) there are many versions of the logo that look almost identical the following is a interesting thread (very long and ongoing) on Gustav Becker clocks and the mine field that is dating them by serial number's, this is something of a on going project for some NAWCC members who are trying to build a accurate database. https://mb.nawcc.org/threads/post-your-gustav-becker-clocks-here.10545/
  14. 1 point
    oldhippy

    So is this really from 1850 era?

    wls1971 You mihgt like a copy of this pdf I have. I have blown the back plate up to see the id and it is number 149 in the list which dates it to be 1850 up to 1860 old_factories.pdf
  15. 1 point
    oldhippy

    So is this really from 1850 era?

    I found my info here. https://www.antiqueclockspriceguide.com/beckerserials.php
  16. 1 point
    wls1971

    So is this really from 1850 era?

    Its not that simple to date Gustav Becker clocks they owned more than one production site and each site used different serial numbers, they where also taken over by Junghans and serial numbers again changed, I think your clock would date from 1900-1920 its generally excepted that most online serial number lists refer to clock's only produced at the Frieburg factory and is accurate upto 1900 for that factory only. There where various ways these later clocks where dated many have a three digit code on the front plate of the movement. You could ask on the NAWCC web site forums there are plenty of Becker experts on there who are actively trying to produce a serial number list for later Gustav Becker clocks.
  17. 1 point
    oldhippy

    So is this really from 1850 era?

    Correct it is from around 1850 to 1860. This is because the serial numbers are only 3 numbers, anything latter the numbers are are in thousands.
  18. 1 point
    AndyHull

    So is this really from 1850 era?

    I'm no expert, but that looks very similar to a clock my grandmother had, which would have been late Victorian (1890s from memory), so it is possible yours is a little earlier. I'm sure someone here could narrow down the date a little better, but you may need to get some close up pictures of the works. Particularly the regulator/pendulum and the striking mechanism. This may require you to remove the clock from the case, if you are comfortable doing this. This might be of interest. http://www.clockguy.com/SiteRelated/SiteReferencePages/GustavBeckerHistory.html
  19. 1 point
    AndyHull

    Best Machine for crystal repair

    Since the objects you are polishing are relatively small, you could fabri-coble together a small polishing machine using a 12V motor with built in gearbox. Something like this (search ebay for motor 1000 rpm, for lots of other ideas). https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/DC-3V-6V-12V-N20-Micro-Gear-Box-Geared-Motor-Speed-Reduction-Motor-Electric-HL/163064234690?hash=item25f762c2c2:m:mGGGwyKyZWTloM7wviCPQDQ:rk:1:pf:0 Most Dremel type tools have some sort of speed controller, which often lets you go pretty slow, but there is usually a trade off between power and speed. Also try searching ebay for "jewelry polishing tool" and "dental polishing tool", you will see a plethora of different types of buffing and polishing stuff. To remove scratches from crystals, I tend to go for the simplest method, and polish by hand, but it does take a fair bit of time, so if you do come up with a near perfect motorised solution, which doesn't take up too much space let us know.
  20. 1 point
    HSL

    Watch of Today

    For sure.. but atleast now one have a reason to wear sunglasses at the office now.. and maybe some sun lotion
  21. 1 point
    AndyHull

    Watch of Today

    Very elegant. A whole lot more subtle than my "golden boy".
  22. 1 point
    This thread is fast becoming a favourite! Hopefully next you’ll break a wheel and have to re-machine one from scratch, or find a broken jewel as could do with learning that too! [emoji897] [emoji3047] Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  23. 1 point
    HSL

    Revisiting an old hobby

    I can't deny that sometimes one search through auction sites to find something special, the other day I just got the urge to buy my first bumper automatic, the downside was I had to buy 5 more watches with it . Received it today and found out one actually can fix watches by lighting bonfires in them, at least it looked like it when i opened the watch. But despite this I know deep inside I still will buy these watches in the future by an magical bid appearing at the auction in my name. I myself suspect I have some kind of poltergeist roaming around in my computer. My eye spots an arrow above the 17 jewels, maybe you just found the 13th watch in the dirty dozen collection
  24. 1 point
    ... sorry, I didn't quite catch what you said there, I was too busy looking on ebay...
  25. 1 point
    Looks legit to me (but don't take my word for it) and in fantastic condition. If you can get for $25 (starting bid?) and the shipping is reasonable, then yes it's a steal!
  26. 1 point
    chrisdt

    Watch of Today

    Looks a nice watch....I once had a Lagonda but it was a car
  27. 1 point
    I can recommend carbide drills from eternal tools. See my second to last video on YT, repairing a broken pivot. and you will see They cut through like butter. Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk
  28. 1 point
    KelSolaar

    British School of Watchmaking Course

    Mark's great, I've done his courses. You can see a watch I constructed on his Facebook page with the seagull movement I used for the course. Yes, watches are great and were the one few possessions I was allowed as a kid. I can still remember the smell of Cornfords jewellers. It was a place of wonder. The great thing about clocks and watches is that IT guys like us can still have it as a really cool hobby.
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