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measuretwice

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measuretwice last won the day on March 13

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  1. What's the book? Its easy say, near impossible to do without a lot of special equipment. I believe the manufactures used special angled fixtures of their contrivance. I'm not sure there is a bigger machining challenge than getting a bi conical section mating to another to a high standard of finish and accuracy. but, imo, the starting point is whats the symptom/observation. If its just some very light scoring that might be taken out with fine stones (Arkansas or red ones, are ruby something)?
  2. imo its close the to 'good luck'. Have you had it apart for a look? whats making you think they're pooched. They last almost forever unless allowed to run dry
  3. that's the part I was curious about, they call you? I've only ever had them show up at the door with the package and their hand out. So you send them away - do instruct at all, i.e. "I'm going to self clear this please hold at your warehouse"? What do you get from them, document wise, at that point to start the self clear process? How do you even know what warehouse (some use 3rd party logistics co's)? I've read about self clearing but all seems devoid of the detail you'd need to give it try.
  4. That'd be reason enough, revenge! I've read about this before, and a drive out to say the airport (i'm in TO) isn't exactly free or enjoyable so I haven't yet acted on it. What exactly is the sequence? Do you somehow get an advanced shipping notice and tell them not to hold/not deliver, or do they show up at the door and you do/say what?
  5. did you see the fixture in this thread? https://www.watchrepairtalk.com/topic/11458-cousins-pallet-shellac/?tab=comments#comment-103598 I thought it quite clever
  6. I can't remember the rational but I remember reading it was waxed that you want for watch work. The dewaxed is common for woodworking finishing, the waxed seemed tougher to find. My use was work holding where I don't think it matters, but I do recall reading about the two very neat fixture btw, I have not seen something like that before
  7. way to go, I think they are a nice lathe. imo its quite a different format and function than a watchmakers lathe. A watchmakers lathe is great for in close with loupe and graver, but your's is imo more useful for general machining, tools, clock stuff, etc - you really need both . Be sure to post some of your work!
  8. I'd always thought a key aspect of great watch cleaner was no residue, like the L&R products with multi jar contraptions (which I have and really like). I think L&R makes an ultrasound solution as well. Once trick to controlling cost is to put water in the tank but suspend a glass jar with parts and special cleaning fluid into the water; it greatly reduces the cleaner required and the waves travel well through glass. I also like using water and some simple green general cleaner/degreaser in my ultrasonic cleaner..it does an amazing job of cleaning general things, but I haven't used it on watches as I've no idea of the residue factor
  9. The online classified have been all the rage here for ages, you don't have a kijiji, craiglist or similar? I've probably bought 4 or 5 complete watchmakers kits, retired and estates, over the years. Two of which were phenomenal, the guys must have been toolaholics like yours truly. After selling the duplicates back into the system I kind of have at east one of most everything and at a very low cost base. The downside is time......like the cliche, you want it fast, high quality and low price, pick two
  10. Sure, print in plastic, make a sand mold or vulcanize with some rubber to make a rubber mold . Or you can get printable wax and then do the lost wax thing....that opens open new doors and being wax you can work the piece, add to it etc before casting, it has a lot of possibilities. You could even use it for the mold itself, depending on the material being cast
  11. seeing them side by side like that t does look really similar, perhaps it was a copy.. I searched images wondering why I thought it wasn't, and I didn't realized how many Sieg models there are
  12. In that size I like the U3 as well. I've I think I have 16 lathes at the moment from a 5200lb DSG down to a 6mm Lorch (that's just the keepers list, and yes I think its a disease) so don't really need it, but there's just something about the U3 that I like. I don't see the Sieg as a U3 copy, similar shape and size but it doesn't look like a copy.
  13. I agree about machining annealed material. I've made lots of tools and cutters over the years and would never imagine heat treating first. No doubt intended to be a convenience for watchmakers, but imo heat treating is so easy, and turning hardened material such a pita, that its not. And that a $3 length of small dia O1 drill rod available from any industrial supply will probably last a lifetime of amateur balance staff turning, makes it an easy call. The charcoal I assume is to get rid of oxygen, i.e. to prevent scaling? You don't like the cover in soap trick?
  14. I've tried everything. Some excel at certain things better than others, but the best is still a good loupe mounted to your head (vs the eye socket grip which I could never do for any length of time). The challenge with optivisors (for me) is not enough magnification and not always great optical quality. The challenge with things not mounted to the head is you lose that ability to change view angle and depth field in split second by a tiny head movement. I fibbed....one thing I haven't tried is a surgeons magnifiers. These have a long focal length, and maybe enough magnification. I have tried them because for a quality set they cost thousands....but I see now cheap offshore ones are on ebay for 10's. I can't imagine you get much for 20-30 dollars, but then again its cheap to try
  15. #1 is the Horia pivot polisher, they call it the MTM https://www.horia.ch/en/Products/ApparatusMandMTM/Assortment/MTM-device.html beautiful tool, and yes they are rather proud of it
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