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I have two male cats named Charley & Dexter. Charley is a mouser and very rarely stays in doors but Dexter is more of  homely cat. Very often he sits on my lap while I am stripping a watch or clock. However he is not allowed in my workshop when cleaning and assembling because them cat hairs are a bloody nuisance. 

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My cat knows its not allowed on the bench top, but she jumps up there anyhow, but always jumps up on the far side of the bench away from me so I have to get up and walk over  to her and pick her up and carry her to somewhere else/

I'm sure she thinks it is a game.

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We have two, in fact we have always had cats that always live to a ripe old ages. Very often I have one sitting on my lap when dis- assembling and the other under the workbench in the winter where there is a radiator. However they are not allowed when assembling them bl**dy hairs get everywhere.

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IMG_0063.thumb.JPG.3ee003423d0304ae16e2798609e785e2.JPG

This is George. He doesn’t just do watches. Here he’s helping me update the operating system on an iPhone.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

For those who may be interested George is a pedigree Maine Coon bred by my wife in the UK.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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13 hours ago, oldhippy said:

Here are my two. They will both be 20 in September. I love them to bits. The long hair is Cookie a she cat and her brother Crumble both from the same litter.

Cookie.JPG

Crumble.JPG

My wife says when she dies I will become 'The Crazy Cat Lady " on the show the Simpsons

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Every minute you love a cat, you live a minute longer.


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We have 30 cats so I must be gaining half an hour every minute!

Mind I don’t love all of them all of the time. Worming tablets usually involve some blood loss on my part!


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3 hours ago, Neileg said:


We have 30 cats so I must be gaining half an hour every minute!

Mind I don’t love all of them all of the time. Worming tablets usually involve some blood loss on my part!
 

Whoa! A whole colony! 

They stay inside or outside or both?

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