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We moved in a new house and found this fella and another lookalike to wander around our backyard a lot. We aren't sure if they got an owner but judging from their appetite they have not.
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Lovely cat. If you can grab them give them some wormer otherwise you’re feeding the worms.

Hope the relationship works out!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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For the last few weeks we have been followed along the road by this little fellow. Today he joined us in the garden. He (she?) doesn’t seem like a stray, but is very friendly.

 

With fur like a sheep, the girls nick named her (him) ‘Herdy’

 

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76236f262876b716cef0c9a20b70fe98.jpg&key=aa739647c9075533cc739ce3362f4da74f78d9bfda97623f3fa3f306842f5ee7

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

 

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