Jump to content
  • 0

Seiko oscillating weight repair possibility?


Question

This is my first disassembly. :DThe movement is a 7s26 from a Seiko 5 watch. It was running a few minutes at a time before disassembly. The oscillating weight was in two pieces. It appears the three pins(?) have all broken.

My questions are: Can this be repaired? Is it as simple as pushing the broken pins out and replacement? What tool would I need to perform such a repair. I know I can replace the complete oscillating weight, but what fun would that be?

Thanks for your time and knowledge,

20160717_untitled_011.MOV.00_00_48_09.Still001.jpg20160717_untitled_011.MOV.00_00_52_25.Still003.jpg20160717_untitled_013.MOV.00_04_26_16.Still001.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

12 answers to this question

Recommended Posts

  • 0

Never seen that before. But sometime is a first time for everything? i guess you could push some new pins in? Stainless steel pins. But i think you would need a staking tool. 

Have a few of those but i reckon you would be better of buying a new or som movements from the watchcollector on Ebay. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

I had this happen to  a rescued 7s26 from watchcollector, posted pics a few weeks ago. I used glue, not a lot and its been running fine sure seems to be a common issue with these movements.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
2 hours ago, WileyDave said:

I had this happen to  a rescued 7s26 from watchcollector, posted pics a few weeks ago. I used glue, not a lot and its been running fine sure seems to be a common issue with these movements.

 

What type of glue did you use? Super glue?

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
1 hour ago, Claytonc said:

What type of glue did you use? Super glue?

yes, but sparingly, like a small dot on each pin, I let set overnight in a clothespin, make sure assembly is level with weight, just like factory, now I won't guarantee it will work for you, but pretty sure the tolerances for weight assm should be able handle a few dots of glue, let us know what happens.

Dave

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

I had this with two Seiko LM's last week alone, exact same problem. I refitted/alligned the parts together and staked them with a small square/rectangular punch, with a good stake or crimp at each outer edge they weight will stay in place correctly :)

If done well the stake marks are not visible from outer side of oscillator, just in case you have clear back :thumbsu:

 

Personally i would avoid superglue as temperature fluctuations over time may cause the weight to separate from the rotor, if staking is not possible due to lack of tooling them Loctite make some very strong thread lock solutions that can be used without much traces being left ( plus unaffected by temps under 50c ). Just my 2 cents 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
1 hour ago, MrBeat said:

Personally i would avoid superglue as temperature fluctuations over time may cause the weight to separate from the rotor, if staking is not possible due to lack of tooling them Loctite make some very strong thread lock solutions that can be used without much traces being left ( plus unaffected by temps under 50c ). Just my 2 cents 

 

I agree and you guessed my problem...lack of tooling. I'm just looking into purchasing a staking tool set. So many to choose from on the fleabay. Thanks of the Loctite suggestion. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
3 minutes ago, Claytonc said:

I agree and you guessed my problem...lack of tooling. I'm just looking into purchasing a staking tool set. So many to choose from on the fleabay.

If you are at the beginning and plan to do simple work, service and some parts replacement, a staking set is not a priority purchase.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
1 minute ago, jdm said:

If you are at the beginning and plan to do simple work, service and some parts replacement, a staking set is not a priority purchase.

Defiantly at the beginning. I just got my first set of Bergeon Screwdrivers delivered yesterday. I didn't know what i was missing.  Hugh difference having quality tools.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

If you get yourself some Loctite 290 or stronger ( check their website for stats/strengths ) you can get a good bond. Line each surface that requires the bond carefully with a light layer ,fix together , wipe away excess with some methylated spirit on cloth. Should set  firm in 20 minutes but fully cured in 24 hours. Best of all if done right there will be no signs it was ever detached :)

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
11 hours ago, MrBeat said:

If you get yourself some Loctite 290

Much better solution than superglue! Staking together probably best, but not for faint of heart:startle:

Link to post
Share on other sites


  • Similar Content

    • By CharDav
      Hi All
      Any ideas how I can improve the look of this calendar ring?
      The staining seems to have got underneath the lacquer.  I've not tried anything yet as I'm a little hesitant at using any liquid on it for fear of damaging the lacquer further.  i'm still learning...
      Many thanks
       

    • By richiesgr
      Hi
      I've tried to service a tiny Seiko 2601 Automatic movement very small for me (18 mm)
      So I finished  yesterday all was ok I've rewinded and I was happy because the balance started I've not checked amplitude or precision (for me just ticking it's already something)
      Today I check and the watch have stopped and do not restart even when I rewind manually. 
      Now when I put the main spring back in the barrel I've broken the end part at the opposite side of the pinion it was like a V because I don't have a main  spring rewinder so I make it manually (Shame on me).
      So I suspect that the main spring is not clamped in the barrel and it's just spinning inside without giving any power to the movement.
      The question is what method can I use to check my assumption. Not forget It's an automatic movement.
      Thanks  
    • By RNS
      Good day all,
      I'm a recent 30 year retiree and elected to start cleaning some of my older watches that ended up in a box wrapped in a towel.  One in particular, a gift from my grandfather, began working with a new battery but the crystal appears foggy.
      I would appreciate specific instructions for removing the stem/ crown and cleaning the crystal from an 1980 Seiko with the 6030A movement.
      Thank you in advance.
      Regards,
      Rick



    • By DanteFalcioni
      I recently purchased what I call a “Franken-watch” Seiko from a seller on eBay from India. As I’m sure many of you know by now there are hundreds of listings (see screenshot below) for cheap Seiko watches with weird dials, most likely repainted. They aren’t fully “fake” as most of them come with genuine Seiko movements. My Retro Watches has a good video where he looks at a watch he bought from a dealer similar to this if you’re curious, see link below.
      https://youtu.be/G_m4b3OBEMI
      Anyways I thought one of these cheap weird watches would be a fun one to play around with as my first project, and I paid $20CAD for mine which I thought to be good especially if the movement inside was genuine Seiko. First problem I noticed was the bracelet (which was cheap and terrible) was held in by shoulder-less spring bars which would be fine if the lugs had holes but they do not so I had to saw the bracelet off so I could put another one on (see wreckage below). There’s more but I won’t bore you too much..
      MY MAIN PROBLEM:
      The watch came with a Seiko 6349A (23J) movement which is a variation of the Seiko 6309 (17J) movement. The movement was held into the case only by the crown (see pictures below) and didn’t have a movement ring. As I understand this is bad because the movement isn’t securely held in the case by anything. I’ve tried to find one on eBay but I’ve had no luck, and I can’t find anywhere that has the ring size so I can’t try and find an aftermarket one. 
       
      Does anyone know where I can get one of these movement holder rings? Is it even possible to get one off of CousinsUK or Esslinger or somewhere? Do any of you have one I could buy? I am very stuck and any help is greatly appreciated!




    • By Rafael
      Hi, 
      Can someone please explain to me how on earth do i unwind this Seiko 5126A movement prior to reassembly? (Picture attached).
      No manual winding as far as I could find and the winding screw on top of the bridge is not counterturning automatically when I push back the click and basically nothing happens. I can unscrew it but this just releases the screw.
      I'll mention that I did experimented with this movement (it's my watch) and first time accidently removed the bridge with power still left. No visible harm was found and after reassembly (hopefully a proper one) everything seemed in order (except for the oiling and cleaning which I haven't yet performed and is due now).
      Thanks!
      Rafael

  • Recently Browsing

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Well, that is definitely the best response post of any forum that I have ever read and agree with all of what you have said, especially "yard sales" as I believe that is an American phenomenon which you would have more understanding of than me. My problem was with the tone and wording of the original OP's post and if some people cannot see that then so be it. I make no apologies for my comments and stand by everything I said.
    • You're welcome, always happy to assist the wayward to choose the right path! (American pickers currently showing on the Discovery channel).
    • Agreed on replacing the electrolytics.  From what I understand, that solves 90% of the preventative care issues.  There are no tubes in this, so that's not a concern.  Sometimes transistors go out, but those are generally easy to spot as they often short when they fail.
    • The beginning of a learning curve.  I'm just starting out and no doubt many will end up in the bin and a few tiny wheels in inaccessible places.  I still remember my Timex with a mixture of sadness and fondness.  Many decades later and I still prefer that style of watch - easy to read dial, not to big, not too small.  My current everyday watch is a quartz Lorus.  Had it for about 15 years now.
×
×
  • Create New...