Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'seiko'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Watch Repair Tutorials & Information
  • WRT LOUNGE
    • WRT News & Announcements
    • Introduce Yourself Here
    • Chat About Anything Here
    • Chat About Watches & The Industry Here
    • Your Watch Collection
    • Help & Support With This Website
  • WATCH REPAIR DISCUSSIONS
    • Your Projects, Walkthroughs and Techniques
    • Watch Repairs Help & Advice
    • Watch Repair Tools & Equipment
    • Watch Repair Gallery
    • Clock Corner
  • WATCH REPAIR LESSONS
    • Patron Announcements & Chat
    • Premium Videos
  • OTHER RESOURCES
    • Watch Technical Data & Service Sheets
    • Watch Repair Videos
    • Directory of other Horology related websites

Categories

  • Watch Repair Basics
  • Balance & Escapement
  • Watch Movement Servicing & Stripdowns
  • Quartz Watch Repairs & Service
  • Fitting Watch Jewels
  • Machining & Turning
  • Clock Repair Videos

Categories

  • Watch Movement Servicing
  • Watch Repair Techniques

Categories

  • Watch Servicing & Repair
  • Clock Servicing & Repair
  • Watch & Clock Making Books
  • Other Horology Related Books

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests

Found 53 results

  1. Hello, I recently reacquired a watch I had swapped off to a friend years ago, a Seiko 7t62-0am0 Asymmetry (I believe was the name). The watch is a quartz movement and is a chronograph. When I initially bought the watch (new) it was worn gently. When I traded off the piece it was to a dear friend who tucked it away in a box and essentially forgot about it until recently. I got the piece back a few weeks ago, had a battery installed at an AD and it worked normally. After arriving home, I put on the watch and it was functioning normally, except it stopped after about 30 or so minutes. I took it off thinking it was a faulty battery or connection, but when I looked at it the next day in the display case it was again working. After repeatedly wearing the watch and removing the watch when it would stop, I have come to believe that my body heat is causing some metal part to expand, thereby making the watch stop. Could this be the case? If so, what exactly is the issue (i.e., which part is the culprit)? *the photo is a stock photo of this model watch* Thank you in advance for your assistance. Respectfully, Dr. C. King
  2. I received this really nice Seiko 7T42-6A00 to service and the description was that the timer (yes, this particular 7Txx model has a timer also) was not working. After first inspection, actually I noticed that it had some more issues, among which the quickdate that was not working. I made a video presentation of this watch: I decided to strip down completely the movement since it apparently had never being serviced. A movement swap was just not an option... Opening the case no sign of damage was visible, although I did notice some very fine white dust, probably some acid liquid that had dried out. Removing the movement from the case, and inspecting it, showed indeed traces of dried up acid:
  3. I need to source a "Date Indicator Maintaining Plate" #0808-300 for a 7S26 "C" movement. I'm building a franken movement out of an "A" and "C" model and Seiko changed this plate. Any ideas as to sources? Thanks, RMD
  4. Hi everyone, I'm new to the forum and watch repair. It's great to have a resource like this when things aren't working as they should! I recently bought a 6119-6400 with a couple of known issues that I'd appreciate some assistance with. Firstly, the internal bezel is very stiff, it turns but with quite a bit of effort. Secondly, the quickset date works, but the crown sticks once pushed in and the day won't change when the crown is pushed. It does advance when changing the time between 9pm and 1am though. Lastly, I confess I'm not much of a fan of the hardlex crystal and would love to try a slightly domed sapphire (it's a UFO, right?). How do I find something to fit, any suggestions? I have the sense that trying any old 33mm crystal is unlikely to work. Thanks in advance for any help you can offer!
  5. Hello dear watchmakers. Last week, I was lucky enough to get my self a beautiful vintage Seiko chronograph watch with 7015 movement. The overall condition looked great so I did not expect any problem with the watch. However, over the last few days, I noticed that this watch stops around 1~2am when the day disk moves to the next day. At first, I thought there was no residual power in the mainspring but the watch won't start after being shaken for some time. It runs well and keeps good timing after I move the day disk manually by adjusting hands by crown till the next night around 1 am. Could you please give me any ideas on this issue?? I really love this watch and want to make this watch perfectly functional. Thank you. I put some photo of the watch and what timegrapher tells
  6. Hello Mates, Im working on a Seiko movment 7619-1020, and when I have cleaned it and oiled it. And are doing some testing, and it runs good laying with face down, but when I flip it over, it will not gor good. And almost stop. Some ideas where to start searching ??
  7. Tonyboy777

    Seiko A259

    Hello. Was wondering if anyone has a seiko A259 LCD Watch. And could measure the crystal. Would like to know if it’s the same size as a SPBG0003. Thanks Tony
  8. Hi All, I have a seiko 6139-7100 chrono, the watch was serviced twice in the past three months by two different watchmakers and both can't seem to figure out the problem, the watch itself keeps excellent time, but the chronograph is 2-3 seconds fast a MINUTE, which is crazy, any ideas on what is the cause? how can the time telling function of the watch be keeping accurate time while the chrono is not?aren't they both supposed to be depending on the same 4th wheel? Thanks.
  9. How to remove this winding stem? I don't know what I should push to remove this winding stem.
  10. Seiko 7S26A Complete Service Background I have a good friend, a brother in Christ Jesus, who I've known for many years. He knows I've embarked on retraining myself for a new career in Watchmaking, and seen my first two restored watches. He told me that his old faithful Seiko 5, which he's worn everyday for 12 years, has recently had issues. Occasionally it will advance rapidly in time (up to an hour in a few seconds) and then just keep ticking away normally. I told him I'd be happy to take a look at it, and put it on my ACEtimer Timegrapher. The pattern on the screen looked like a B-52 drop in Nam (stupid me forgot to take a photo), and I told him that his watch definitely needed an inspection and service. So started my research on what the problem might be. After reading a "Practical Watchmaking", and the many forums that I've read, I was pretty sure it was the Pallet Fork ... either very dirty or damaged stones, or a broken/damaged fork pivot. So onward to the service... Disassembly One unusual aspect of this watch is the crown ... or lack there of, more to the point. I suppose since this is an automatic watch, they thought it didn't need to be wound. This watch also has a display back, so extra special care not to mark any of the plates, or damage screw heads! The first issue you'll face when working on a 7S26A Movement, is how to get the stem out! It isn't obvious at all, and there is a little trick. The crown needs to be pushed all the way in to expose the push plate (it is hidden in the other crown positions). I took this photo once the movement was out to best illustrate where to push. Remove the Hands, Dial and Oscillating Weight (2.0mm Screwdriver). Gently lever up one end of the circlip and carefully work your way around. You then should be able to raise the circlip up the length of the shaft without it pinging off. Remove the Day Wheel and the four screws holding the Date Dial Guard. (Use a 1.40mm Screwdriver, and this driver is good of all the screws from now on; bar one.) NOTE ORANGE ARROW: Seiko Special Tool needed for the 0.98mm Philipshead Screw (Part Number: S-921) I had to journey down to my nearest Seiko Distributor and grab one ... cost was AU$24.00 Here's a closer look at the troublesome screw. Remove Date Jumper, and note that the Date Drivewheel lips over the top of the plate. Remove all the motion work, and pull the Cannon Pinion Remove the tension from the Mainspring. Remove the Ratchet Wheel and the Second Reduction Wheel and Pinion. (remember the Reduction Wheel has a reverse thread) Unscrew the Balance Cock and remove the Balance. Also unscrew the Pellet Cock and remove the Pellet Fork. BINGO! Found the problem with my friends watch. The top pivot on the fork is broken. Easy fix with a replacement fork :) Remove the Barrel/Train Wheel Bridge Remove the Click, then the Barrel. Remove the Fourth Wheel, Third Wheel and Escapement. Unscrew the Centre Wheel Bridge and remove the Centre Wheel Now to the Keyless Work. Remove the Setting Lever Spring Remove the Yoke and the Setting Lever Pull the Stem out, and the Clutch and Intermediate Wheel will fall away. Lastly, pull the black plastic location ring off. ... and now it's bath time!!! I hope this has been of help to you guys. I'll post the Assembly steps in this thread tomorrow morning.
  11. Hi Everyone, Recently I have become obsessed with ana digi watches from the 1980's! I really dig the style for some reason. I was looking on ebay in the low price ranges and I found this little nugget for the princely sum of $5.70 - the shipping from Peru was an inflated $20 AUD - so I got away with it for under $30. It came well packed in a little padded envelope. It was missing the back, had severe damage, but I didn't see any rust stains on the back. A view from the side It is a Seiko H127A-5000 - the year could be between 1979 and 1980 - there is a little bit of info around the internet. The case back will be an insanely rare part to find so I may have to CNC mill something or potentially 3d print a plastic back. That is if I can get it working. The Crystal is trash. I've tried sanding it, will wait till I have some crystal polish - I haven't had much luck polishing mineral crystals. A new crystal is around $35 - with OEM Seiko writing. I removed the movement and soaked it in WD40 to loosen all the bolts. It was too seized to attempt opening. The LCD panel/dial has a crack in it. The sub assembly appears clean, the zebra strips on the LCD were a bit gummed up but cleaned up. Happily the analogue movement was turning over freely, it wasn't ticking - but likely due to so much grit and much on the contacts. The only corrosion was on the rotor, and some of the non important chrome plated parts. I've soaked them in shellite. Cleaned with blutac and then inspected under microscope. Everything appears fine. It is a very high end movement with 8 jewels and all metal parts - it would have been top of the line back in the day. Very tiny parts. The main circuit board is out - my it looks complicated. Simple plain jane movement - nothing fancy: It's all inside: The bridge is off and the rotor is next to the movement: Cleaning the case: Tonight I have finished cleaning everything - I have put it into my movement parts tray - awaiting some time after work tommorow. If anyone knows how the LCD works please let me know - is the display in the top dial section? Or the next layer down? There is a white mirror presumably to reflect the light off the screen as this is the black model version (there were two models). Parts look pricey and rare - I've found a dial panel NOS - also crystals online. May have to look for circuit board if its fried - Can't find any bracelets - may have to go non OEM generic steel band. Goal is to get it running - if its not running - atleast to be a show piece in my cabinet. More soon
  12. Seiko 5J22A Complete Service Hunting through my cupboards I found my old Seiko Kentic "Auto Relay" that I purchased sometime in the 90s, when this was the latest cutting edge Quartz Watch on the market offered by Seiko. It's been sitting for over a decade without use, and I decided to really push myself and, with the Lord's assistance, completely strip and service this watch. So I tracked down the Tech Specs, and if you are thinking of embarking on servicing the 5J22 YOU WILL NEED THEM!! :) So here they are: 5J22A.pdf I will be using the part names from this document for this walkthrough, so download and print it out for you own sanity. The parts in this movement are incredibly small, so much so that my camera had trouble focusing on them ... so part names will help you as much as the visuals aids for this service. Once again, I've had no one to guide me on this, so this is the way "I" stripped the movement down, the correct factory procedure may, and probably does, differ from my way ... so I give a warning here: CONTINUE AT YOUR OWN RISK. Disassembly Unscrew the back cover and store the rubber gasket away safely. With a 2.0mm Screwdriver, pry the Location Ring out with the slots provided in the plastic ring. Remove the Oscillating Weight with a 1.20mm Screwdriver ... and this will be the driver you use on all further screws. To remove the Stem, you need to have the Stem push all the way home, to move the Yoke into the correct position so you can depress the lever (Location shown in picture after I removed the movement to make it easier to see the spot where you push) The movement should now come out of the case along with the internal Bezel Ring. Remove the Hands Remove the 7 screws for the Circuit Block Cover A, and the Rechargeable Battery Clamp (Sorry referred to an older pic to so you the location of screws) Remove the Insulator for Rechargeable Battery, and then the Battery itself. Remove Circuit Block Cover A Remove Circuit Block Cover D Reference picture of Circuit Block Cover D Remove Circuit Block Cover B Reference picture of Circuit Block Cover B Remove Oscillating Weight Bridge Reference picture of Oscillating Weight Bridge Remove Circuit Block Cover C Reference picture of Circuit Block Cover C Remove Circuit Block NOTE: The pin with the yellow arrow pointing to it holds onto the Circuit Block very firmly. Be CAREFULLY and GENTLE, as the Circuit Block can be easily damaged. This is the angle of attack that I recommend. Coming in on an angle just in front of the Crystal Unit, and gently push upwards ... and I mean GENTLY. Patience wins the day! Remove the Intermediate Wheel for the Generating Rotor Remove the Generating Coil Block (grasp with tweezers where indicated with yellow arrow) Remove the Second Coil Block (grasp with tweezers where indicated with yellow arrow) Remove the Hour and Minute Coil Block (grasp with tweezers where indicated with yellow arrow) Remove the Train Wheel Bridge Remove the Second Wheel and Pinion, the Third and Fourth Wheel Remove the Intermediate Second Wheel TIP: Next is this first of three sets of Stators and Rotors that make up this Quartz Movement. Be sure to place all the Stators and Rotors into a piece of Rodico for safe keeping. As shown below: THESE PARTS ARE MAGNETIC AND WILL ATTRACT PARTICLES, SO DO NOT PUT INTO THE BASKET FOR CLEANING Remove the Second Stator and Second Rotor Remove the Minute Wheel and Pinion, Intermediate Minute Wheel, and Setting Wheel Remove the Center Wheel and Pinion Remove the Generating Stator and Generating Rotor Remove the Setting Lever Spring Remove the Yoke and Setting Lever Note: Release tension on the Yoke Spring FIRST Remove the Clutch Wheel and the First Intermediate Wheel for Calendar Corrector Remove the Hour and Minute Stator and Hour and Minute Rotor This side of the Main Plate is now finished ... time to flip it over and start on the Calendar Works Remove the two screws indicated and remove the Hour Wheel Guard Spring, and the Date Dial Guard Remove the Intermediate Date Driving Wheel Remove the Intermediate Hour Wheel, and Hour Wheel Remove the Date Dial Remove the Day-Date Corrector Wheel, Second Intermediate Wheel for Calendar Corrector, Date Driving Wheel and Spring Note the position of tension of the Date Driving Wheel Spring (bottom of page 9 in the Tech Specs) Remove the Circuit Block Spacer ... and the disassembly is complete! I started work on this rather late at night and took my time and studied each part before removing, making sure to document everything carefully. So I'll clean the parts and begin reassembly fresh tomorrow. I can see this one is really going to push my abilities, and I'm looking forward to tackling it and uploading the reassembly steps.
  13. arkobugg

    Seiko Date issue

    Hello Mates, Working on a Seiko 4S36, and when mounting, cant quick set the date. Can set the day, but not date And when adjusting hands for time, the day move a dip when passing 6 o, clock. And then change as normal at 12 o, clock Have check the caledar work for bod wheel, have changes some of them plastic. But all seems fine, but hard to see under day wheel. Somebody have som good ideas??
  14. Good day all, this is my first post so please excuse my limited knowledge of watches and repairing them. I have a Seiko 5 model number snk805 that I recently bought overseas that has stopped working. It seems like the watch is not being charged even though the self winding weight is spinning as normal. The watch is still on warranty but since i bought it overseas it would be difficult to have shipped back. Basically what I would like to know is if it is worth attempting to fix it myself or would it better to take it to someone trained. I do have some experience with working with watches but i have never attempted to fix an automatic mechanism. Thanks for all the help.
  15. I have a Seiko Kinetic from the mid 90's. I got it second hand. The case seems to be in great condition, so either little wear or the watch was well looked after, or it was not worn a lot. When spun, the watch will begin to tick, but it will only tick as long as it is being spun. Sometimes, it doesn't spin even when spun if it is too light of a spin. Seems to hold no charge, or maybe there is something else wrong with it. Seeing as it is old and a new capacitor wouldn't hurt, I will probably replace it, but I'd like to know if there are any other tests that I could do to find any other issues without manually inspecting each piece? I have done very little work on kinetic watches, so I am not all too knowledgeable. Thnaks
  16. Detailing the stripdown and re-assembly of a Seiko 4L25 watch movement.
  17. Hi there, I've noticed that mostly analogue watches are discussed on this forum so hopefully posting about a digital watch is okay. I bought this M929 from a thrift store for $3 the other day in a non-working condition. After opening it for the first time, it was evident that a battery had leaked at some point - there was quite a bit of corrosive material everywhere. After giving it quite the clean using vinegar for the batteries crap and isopropyl alcohol for everything else, the backlight was again functioning, however, the LCD was not. There appears to be some sort of potentiometer on the back of the main module, although this looks exactly the same as the screws that held in a back metal plate so I stupidly rotated it for a while before I realised it wasn't a screw. I've roughly rotated it back using a reference photo I took before I dismantled it (below) but the best I can get is a very dim set of numbers that flash and are only visible if directly under a light and viewed from an extreme angle - and even then, it does this randomly. I'm not sure if the pot is even for the LCD, though. I've also checked all the other components on the board with a multimeter and there seems to be continuity at least, although measuring the pot leads to no usable number of ohms. Here's a bunch of photos I took. Hopefully, they can be helpful. Any help with the repair will be greatly appreciated. Here is what the watch looked like on first opening. You can see green/blue muck everywhere. Here you can see the extent of the corrosion on the buttons. This was even holding some of them in place. Vinegar made short work of it, however. A close up of the main module before disassembly. The flipside of the module. Corrosion was bad here too More disassembly and after cleaning Otherside. Note the pot at the bottom LCD, reflector and contact transfer things Close up of the LCD The plastic casing cleaned. There is still a bit of corrosion on those contacts but that is as much as I could remove. The flipside Reassembled after cleaning. Accidentally added some scratches from the screwdriver slipping, though. Whoops. Flipside The corrosion had actually eaten into the watches metal. Luckily the buttons were fine after being cleaned. The backlight.
  18. Hello, was wondering if anyone has dealt with any reliable watchmaker's that can repair vintage Seiko watches, I have a few that require dire need of repair, I'm located in New York City, and was wondering if anyone has anyone they can recommend in my area, or, someone who is reliable that I can mail my watches to. Thanks, EddieR
  19. Friends and family have taken an interest in some of the watches I've serviced and since they've only known Quartz pieces I thought I'd fix something up for them for the holidays. So I purchased a couple of Seiko divers a few weeks back off of eBay with the intent of getting them back into spec. One came from the Philippines and the other India and both were in a bad way based on the sellers' images. The first (from the Philippines) turned out to be a pretty good deal as it the entire movement and case was salvageable. It was nothing special to look at the start, that's for sure, but it will spiff up pretty nice in the end. Unfortunately, the picture here (in the condition it arrived) hides the fact that one of the dial feet has gone missing. The correct solution to this problem is to solder the foot back in place but me being a fool with a soldering iron I opted for a strong two part epoxy instead. The dial may or may not be original but it's in fair shape and needs only to have the luminous paint removed and reapplied (I've not done this before so we'll see how it goes). The hands will be polished and replated as they are a real mess. The movement is in excellent shape and has sprung back to life with a proper cleaning. The only part of that endeavor which was out of the norm was the removal of "dial glue" from the movement with a bit of acetone. I'm currently just awaiting the replacement bezel insert and a new 2.25mm watch crystal to finish this up. Unfortunately the watch from India- well that was a whole 'other story! It was clear right off the bat that there was an issue with the dial as it sits crooked in the case. I thought this was the result of another missing dial foot but it was much worse than that- both feet are missing although it may not have mattered because the wrong movement was in the case as well. The diver should have a 7002 (17 Jewel Automatic with Date) movement but instead has a 7019 (21 Jewel, Automatic, Day-Date) fitted. Close examination revealed a bit of (ahem) over-oiling? Just when you think you've seen the worst case of excess lubrication in a watch movement a new case comes along. I'm still only about halfway through this repair so I'll follow-up with some images as they come. With the dial feet lost and the dial bathed in thick oil, I considered it a lost cause and proceeded unafraid with a cleansing using isopropyl alcohol- it actually cleaned up fairly nice but will need quite a bit of work to be considered "good enough" for daily use. Some foolish person apparently tried to remove the lime using car keys or some such tool and scratched the dial terribly. (sigh) I've since finished servicing the 7019 movement although the mainspring had failed and I'm not certainly I'll bother with a replacement as the movement will probably just be flipped to offset the cost of the proper 7002 movement. More to come soon...
  20. Hey There i'm developing a thing for watches here... I've always had this weakness, but midlife entering the house is maybe accelerating this :-) Looking for info on this nice forum/website. Seems quite complex if you start going into repairing vintage watches to get all the spare parts you need... grtz Gianni
  21. Hello, I have a Seiko SRP777 where they date changes correctly, but the day does not (it changes halfway, getting stuck between two days). When / if I try to change the day manually, it is as if something doesn't grip completely. Is this an "easy" fix, or should I have a pro look at this?
  22. Hello everyone, moving this topic from the welcome group. I have repaired and old seiko 7005-8020 and now I need to replace the plexiglass and the two rubber gaskets. i have seen announces in ebay but if some of you have some feedback on best place to get them, happy to hear. Also if you have some hints on what products use to clean the stainless steel, it's kind of stained and i dont want to damage it using the wrong product. some pics. Thanks all in advance.
  23. Hello everyone from northern france. I am just starting to get involved in watch repairing . Today I disassembled, cleaned and reassembled a seiko 7005 8020 from my father and it seems to be working... but now the doubts are coming for cleaning, changing plexi... and as i saw some of you have done repairing on this model..here i am !! ;-) Great forum guys see you Fernando
  24. Hi all, First of all I would like to say I am new to the forum. I have been working on watches for quite some time now but this one has me stumped (mostly because it's my newest, least touched watch!). A little bit of backstory. This watch is about 2 years old, I purchased it new (Seiko SARB033). It ran fantastically, i got it down to +2 seconds a day and it was a very consistent watch. About a month ago it started losing time. Badly, around 1-2 minutes a day. I initially thought the regulator might have slipped out of position so i adjusted it up. But it still ran poorly, gaining massive amounts and then losing massive amounts. So, I put it on the timegrapher i recently purchased and found this. Does not look good. Can't get amplitude above 180 and there is a strange drop off on the lower line that comes around regularly. I demagnetized the watch and the balance separately, but to no avail. Beat error was also horrible (around 2.5ms), but i've adjusted that down a bit just so it could be read easier. What do you think guys? Escapement fault? Gear train? Slipping mainspring?
  25. I've just picked up an H801-6008 that is quite a cool and I'm trying to get it all going. The digital module seems to work fine (although the pushers seem to be full of DNA as does the rotating bezel). But the analogue section seems to be troubled as I couldn't get the hands to move after pulling the crown out to position 1. Dropped the movement out and the crown/stem joining seems to be broken. I can hold the stem still between my fingers and rotate the crown over and over in either direction. I can't seem to unscrew the crown from the stem either, and the crown appears to press down the stem a bit and bounce back as if spring mounted. I'm at a bit of a loss as to what to do next: Do I need to bin it and buy a replacement crown and stem? Or is there some technique I'm missing.Hope I've described it properly. Every day is a school day with me!
×