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SteveT

Dipping my toe in the cock waters?

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Hi guys,

I was thinking I'd like to dip  my toe in the waters and see what makes a clock tick.

What would make a good first project / victim? I was thinking a cheap fold up travel clock maybe, if anything just for nostalgic reasons, we had these around the house when I was growing up in the 80's (I don't think they ever got used just sat in a cupboard where I could get my little fingers on them ). Like the one pictured below (I pulled the pic from a google search)

 

ca99b22eec02ebdf0fd9f7aa84614f82.jpg

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I was there a couple of months ago, be careful it’s addictive!

the advice given, and good advice it was too, is to start simple and initially stay away from the cheap mass produced stuff. They are so built down to price that they are throw away and not ideal candidates for repairs. Good for pulling apart to see how things work but then difficult to get working right again.

my suggestion would be to start on an old mantle type, time only or time and strike. Plenty of Smiths out there for low money and once inside the movements are solid. I was given a Smiths Westminster chime and it’s a lovely old clock. The chime setup is complicated and with three trains to work through it takes time to figure it all out. 

Take photos, lots and lots as you dismantle everything. Keep the different trains separated placing each cog run into their own containers to avoid mixing them up and if you can number or mark the order of each train.

There are some top guys on here who will help when things go wrong (and they will go wrong) but when the thing is right and it starts ticking it is the greatest satisfaction of knowing you did that.

good luck and keep us informed 

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Hi Steve    Wat Sqiffy has said is sound advise keep it simple until your confidence grows. Th time only mantle clocks (one hole in the dial) are chunky enough to play with only the suspension and escapement  are breakable the rest is quite tough, please mind the mainsprings and be sure to remove the tension before undoing the plates as the un tamed power when released can damage the clock and make more work. Take care and be patient as the cock up gremlins are sure to turn up.

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If you are going to start on clocks, get yourself a timepiece only. If you want to start with a travel clock, get a Europa alarm. They are easy to work on and if it needs re-bushing you can buy the bushes readymade. You will need a staking tool with punches, just knock the old out and tap the new in.

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Thanks guys, I've done a few watches, and I hardly ever break them now . I've been enjoying servicing old Russian watches, cheap and cheerful. But I was curious to see how different clocks are.

I just took a look on the bay at Smith's they look great. There's one listed close to me (so cheap postage) and only $aud20. It's listed as a mantle but the winding key is at the back not on the face?

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That is a 30 hour. Here is a photo of the balance wheel and how it is held between the two oil cups. It already shows you how the hairspring should be, also how it is pinned. Three things can go wrong with this. 1 The hairspring can be mangled up, 2 the balance pivots can be worn and need to be put into a lathe and re-pointed with a small Arkansas stone. Picture a blunt pencil then turned into a sharp one. 3 The oil cups can wear inside and need to be re-placed or with the right drills cleaned up.

You cannot re-bush the movements the plates are too thin. I know the photo says alarm clock balance. The clock movement in what you are going for its the same.

Alarm_Clock_Balance_Wheel.jpg

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At some point, you will need a lathe for clock repairs. Not all of these movements do you find the balance pivots worn. I was just pointing out the major problems that can happen. It might be a good thing to look out for spares; years ago, you could buy a box of replacement staffs. One way to stone the balance would be to hold the staff in a pin vice, rotate it while stoning. I have never undertaken such work in this way.  A few practice runs on steel pins would be a good start. 

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2 hours ago, SteveT said:

I don't have a lathe is it still worth doing. Hmmmm I'd like a lathe emoji6.png

The lack of a lathe will eventually give rise to problems as the lathe will allow you to do parts repairs/manufacture which will inevitably be required. But you will by that stage be getting to serious levels and the investment would then be worth it. 

Also consider the work that will be done is on a small scale so an industrial sized lathe will not be required.

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All clock repairing that needs a lathe can be achieved on a Unimat 3. It can handle long case clock barrels and the centre wheels. They do not come any bigger than that. I don’t think for one minute you will be undertaking Turret clocks.

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On 4/22/2019 at 10:57 AM, Deggsie said:

Goodness me. I do hope those little electrons at Tapatalk don’t continue to misbehave and randomly insert non horology related photos. emoji12.png

Why Tapatalk? The software that powers the forum has excellent support for mobile browsers. Just try, I think you'll like it. 

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Why Tapatalk? The software that powers the forum has excellent support for mobile browsers. Just try, I think you'll like it. 

Hi JDM. You’ll have to ask JohnT as to why he uses Tapatalk. . If you don’t understand, maybe you’re not seeing the full pictures we see on Tapatalk. Oops!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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Is it possible for somebody to remove this topic and preserve the young lady’s modesty? I’m as warm blooded as the next male, but I feel this isn’t the place for such photos, accidentally placed or not. Deggsie


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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