Jump to content
WillFly

Chart For Watch Movement Sizes

Recommended Posts

I was going through my watch files today and thought I would post this handy chart of watch movement sizes in lignes, "Lancashire" sizes, millimetres and inches - just for reference if anyone needs it.

 

post-64-0-38738800-1400772210_thumb.jpg

Watch sizes.rtf

Edited by WillFly

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

thank you will, sepasgozaram (persian).

I didn't know about movement sizes, thus I seach and find some more info that maybe useful for others:

 

A watch movement's size is gauged by measuring it across its center on the dial side through its narrowest point. This system is used by the U.S. Customs in determining the amount dutiable on imported movements, and thus it has become associated with the sizing of all watch movements brought into this country. Although the use of the millimeter to determine watch sizes is growing steadily, the predominant system still in use is the LIGNE. The LIGNE is equal to the twelfth part of the French Inch, which is approximately 1/16th larger than our own inch. One French ligne=2.25583 or roughly 2¼ mm. Thus a 10 ligne movement should gauge 22.5mm. In inches this would measure .8881 as the LIGNE is equal to .0888 parts of an inch. (Note: These days, movement sizes are more commonly stated in millimeters - Rob )

The SIZE as a gauge with which to measure movements is still used by some of the older American watch manufacturers to indicate the dimensions of their movements. The SIZE as a unit has its basis in the old "0" size movement. This movement measures 1 5/30". A difference of 1/30" accounts for each size smaller or larger than the starting point of the system, the "0" size watch movement. Thus a "1" size movement would be 1 6/30", a "6" size movement 1 11/30". Watch movements smaller than the "0" size are designated by adding zeros to the size. Thus a movement one size smaller than the "0" would be a 2/0 size movement and would gauge 1 4/30", the 3/0 size would then measure 1 3/30. Conversely, the "25" size watch movement would measure just 2 full inches.

A good way to remember sizes of the American and Swiss gauges is to associate the unit we know best, the inch, with both the American and Swiss equivalents. For example, the 6/0 size American movement is exactly one inch in diameter ("0" size = 1 5/30" - 5/30" = one inch). Also, the Swiss 11¼ Ligne is just a few ten thousandths of an inch under one inch, and can be called a one-inch watch movement.

 

ref: http://people.timezone.com/library/workbench/workbench631691117422306218

 

and :

 

Although the use of the millimeter to determine watch sizes is commonplace now, the predominant system still in use up until the 1960's and even to some extent in the 1970's, was the LIGNE. The LIGNE is equal to the twelfth part of the French Inch, which is approximately 1/16th larger than our own inch. One French ligne=2.25583mm or roughly 2¼ mm. Thus a 10 ligne movement should measure 22.5mm. In inches this would be 0.8881 as the LIGNE is equal to .0888 parts of an inch.

American watch manufacturers used to indicate the dimensions of their movements, by means of their own unique "Size" gauge. The "SIZE", as a unit of measurement, had its basis in their old "0" size movement. This movement measures 1" + 5/30" in diameter. Each difference in diameter of 1/30" accounts for each size smaller or larger than the starting point of the system, ie. the "0" size watch movement. Thus a "1" size movement would be 1" + 5/30" +1/30", or 1"+ 6/30" (or 1.2") and a "6" size movement would be 1 + 5/30 + 6/30", or 1 + 11/30" (or 1.366"). Watch movements smaller than the "0" size are designated by adding zeros to the size. Thus a movement one size smaller than the "0" would be a 2/0 size movement and would measure 1" + 5/30" - 1/30", the 3/0 size would then measure 1" +5/30" - 3/30". Conversely, the "25" size watch movement would measure just 2 full inches. A very confusing system compared to the modern simple metric system!

 

ref: http://members.iinet.net.au/~fotoplot/tech/wmms.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok looking through my files found this chart that I have made up over the years. It is watchmakers logo,s which I have found really useful when I need to identify and watch movement. P.S I use a Mac but the PDF does explained using the tool bar.

 

 

Watch maker logos.pdf

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Muchas gracias por compartir esta valiosa información.

He copiado los datos del texto enriquecido y los pasé a un documento de excely  le inserté una tabla.  Y entonces los llevé de nuevo a word y los exporte en pdf 

Lo comparto con ustedes.

 

Un Saludo.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gracias por la conversión de los datos a PDF, estoy seguro que los miembros se encuentra este muy útil. El foro va viento en popa y es s genial tener de entrada de todo el mundo. Skip hablar español, así que espero que el traductor ha trabajado bien?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can't f

On ‎06‎/‎11‎/‎2014 at 8:11 AM, clockboy said:

Ok looking through my files found this chart that I have made up over the years. It is watchmakers logo,s which I have found really useful when I need to identify and watch movement. P.S I use a Mac but the PDF does explained using the tool bar.

 

 

Watch maker logos.pdf

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×
×
  • Create New...