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Can this watch be salvaged?  

6 members have voted

  1. 1. Can this watch be salvaged?

    • Sure!
      5
    • Uh, no.
      1


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Well the movement is pretty much back together this evening.  I ordered some left hand threaded shoulder screws from Cousins and if I'm lucky one will fit for the Flyback Lever, otherwise I'll need to create a left hand threaded tap, use the tap to create a die, and use the die to create a replacement screw (the original was pretty much destroyed by rust).

I'm also missing a properly sized case screw (another item that was rusted beyond salvage). The replacement Stem and pushers are on the way; when they arrive I should be able to wrap this project.

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On ‎6‎/‎12‎/‎2019 at 6:46 AM, yankeedog said:

Watch seals are like timing chain guides.Looking at this , I would think that it is doable.The thing that scares me most is the screws. Rusty ones snap off real easy. How patient are you , and how deep are your pockets?

  those rusty screws will not snap off with aplication of proper penitration oil.   vin

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