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Woods AAAA Oil ("spreading type oil")


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Hello all,

I'm about to service a Timex 260 electric movement.  It's running strong as-is, but I doubt that it has been cleaned or lubricated in its lifetime.  I do have the service manual for the movement and for most of the oil points, the SM calls for Moebius Synt-A-Lube, without specifying a product number (I intend to use Moebius 9010), but for the friction pinion the manual calls for "spreading type oil" (Woods AAAA oil).  I cannot find a cross-reference for this old Woods oil and most watch oils are, of course, specifically formulated to NOT spread...  so, I'm seeking advice and suggestions for a suitable oil to use on the friction pinion.  Also, if anyone thinks that 9010 is NOT appropriate to use for the various other points, please let me know.

Thanks much!

Ben

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Thank you for your suggestion, rogart63.  You may be correct about the Epilame, but I'm not sure that's what they are referring to in this instance. The manual recommends stripping the movement only so far as removing the balance wheel and bridge -- then cleaning the remainder as a unit, and finally applying the oils -- so if a person follows this procedure, I can't see any reasonable way to get an even coating on the relevant part.

I have attached a screencap from the service manual, showing the location where they want the "spreading oil" applied (it's marked as "A").  The impression I get is that they are calling for an oil that will wick into gaps.

I can see how a grease might work here, though -- thank you for the suggestion.

 

PointA.png

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I think that HP-1300 would be just fine there as recommended by many manufacturers. One of its best characteristics is that is stays exactly where you put it.

Edited by jdm
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5 hours ago, WorldPowerLabs said:

Thank you for your suggestion, rogart63.  You may be correct about the Epilame, but I'm not sure that's what they are referring to in this instance. The manual recommends stripping the movement only so far as removing the balance wheel and bridge -- then cleaning the remainder as a unit, and finally applying the oils -- so if a person follows this procedure, I can't see any reasonable way to get an even coating on the relevant part.

I have attached a screencap from the service manual, showing the location where they want the "spreading oil" applied (it's marked as "A").  The impression I get is that they are calling for an oil that will wick into gaps.

I can see how a grease might work here, though -- thank you for the suggestion.

 

PointA.png

They probably mean something else? Something that will spread around under there? Have no idea actually? 

Maybe could dilute 9010 with Naptha so that it spreads more easy? 

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Thank you both for your replies.  I had a chance to begin stripping the movement apart and I found that I can actually gain good access to the friction pinion by disassembling the movement just a little beyond the officially-recommended degree of disassembly -- and by doing so, I'll be able to oil it directly with 9010 rather than hoping that the oil will spread to the proper area.

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