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My First Staking Set Advice


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Hi everyone,

It seems that a staking set is a very useful tool to have around. They are easy to find but prices range from a couple hundred dollars to a couple thousand... It seems that the nicer ones come in a bigger box, and with more "bits"... Second hand ones sometimes have fewer parts but I don't see why you couldn't get extra bits and gizmos (insert technical term) that fit on the brand you got.

I'm looking for any advice you might have as to what to look for on a used staking set (it they're worth getting used ?), for a non-professional user.

Thanks !

 

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I am no pro but I have couple of older K&D staking sets and love them. I went with an older model because it was much cheaper and did everything that a new staking set does. My favorite is the 18R and it comes with all of the bells and whistles. It is great because all of the stakes can be reversed in the tool as used as stakes. It also has a micrometer but and handle to be used for jeweling. Stumps and stakes can still be found for a lot of the vintage staking sets. You just want to be sure that there is no rust or pitting on the tool, stumps, or stakes.

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I bought a Boley set about a year ago and have found it indispensable on quite a few occasions. A lot depends on how serious you are and to what depth you wish to go in the repair of time pieces. If you decide to buy one get as comprehensive a set that you can get your hands on, and make sure that the punches are in good condition.

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stalk ebay I see them all the time for 50-100 bucks,  I have several sets and use them less than I thought I would.

I have only been repairing watches less than a year but not got into changing balance staffs yet.

 

I would get the cheapest set you can find to get started(under 100), you can always list it for what you paid when you are finally ready for more expensive sets (if ever)

 

My recommendation might change after a few years and I learn more but this is the advice I would give for starters.

 

FYI, I also found a deluxe Seitz set with every available option on the 'bay for next to nothing as a BIN, some people just don't know what they are listing so the deals can be found. I have yet to use it either......  :)

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Beware that any second hand set will have gremlins, sometimes it's good to buy several sets over time, make one good set out of the several sets and then sell the others on.

 

Somthing like this will have most of the stuff you need. 

 

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/w25-clock-watchmakers-boxed-86-piece-staking-set-excellent-condition-/181372678060?pt=UK_Jewellery_Watches_WatchAccessories_SpareParts_SM&hash=item2a3aa76fac

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I'll add, It's also nice to find an Inverto setup. Meaning, not only can you use the stumps that come with the set, but you can also use the stakes as stumps by inserting them up side down into the staking tool. I use it in this fashion quite a bit really! I use it mainly for balance staffs, but also for shrinking holes, tightening cannon pinions, etc.

 

I paid about $150us for this C. E. Marshall set. It had a little surface rust on a few of the stakes but was easily removed with a scotch-brite pad...

 

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  • 1 month later...

can any one tell me the weight of these sets in general. If I buy on E bay, (that is the usual place to shop)  I must get them to South Africa from the UK and with the current exchange rate it is quite costly.

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can any one tell me the weight of these sets in general. If I buy on E bay, (that is the usual place to shop)  I must get them to South Africa from the UK and with the current exchange rate it is quite costly.

My set weighs a few grams over 4Kg.

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:phew: O.K. Thanx guys..... that will take the score to UK guys 1....... me 0..... 4 kg are SO NOT going to work over Royal mail to me. I just LOVE tools and will keep admiring them till I die....

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  • 3 months later...

It was reasonably priced at £35......needed a bit of a clean up, but I quite like renovating tools.... :)

That was an absolute bargain!

I agree with what you say Legarm, buy a good quality second hand one, but check that it has the punch sizes you require and that nothing is broken or missing. When I purchased mine, the smallest holes in the plate were blocked and a couple of punches were broken. I turned the broken punches in my watchmakers lathe without softening them by using a carbide lathe tool, and cleaned out the holes by hand with micro drills.

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  • 4 weeks later...

I'm also about to buy a staking set but don't know anything about them.

 

I assume the stakes, stups or whatever fits in that hole on top is hit with a hammer while a jeweling set has a lever to push stuff down. Pardon my ignorance and the simplification.

 

I've seen some staking sets that come with what looks like a jeweling handle.

 

Can anyone enlighten me on the difference and uses of all these tools? I appreciate it and thank you in advance.

 

I'd also would like to know -- if possible -- about interbrand parts compatibility to be able to purchase them in the future if necessary. And about the micrometer adjustments that some of them don't have? Thank you I know I'm asking a lot of question in just a paragraph!

 

PS. I'm looking at a K&D 600 on the bay at this time....is that brand OK and/or compatible with let's say Bergeon in case I need any stake or stump? Can I do jeweling with one of them?

Edited by bobm12
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Bob, I bought a copy of this book and found it excellent.

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/NEW-The-Watchmakers-Staking-Tool-High-quality-pro-printed-crisp-clean-Rare-book-/271447550319?pt=US_Nonfiction_Book&hash=item3f3388e96f

I would also suggest a K&D Reverso set as it allows you to use the punches as stumps thus increasing the versatility of the set.

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bobm12, on 03 Oct 2014 - 12:27 PM, said:bobm12, on 03 Oct 2014 - 12:27 PM, said:

 Pardon my ignorance and the simplification.

 

You and me both Bob ... I have no idea what all those stakes and stuff are for.

 

Thanks for the book reference Geo ... you are always an asset to this forum mate .... more reading and pipe smoking   ^_^

Edited by Lawson
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Thank you Geo, I appreciate the link and reference. I guess I have lots of reading to do. As always great dependable information.

 

I figured the reverso set would have been a good tool set -- I've piece descriptions, etc into some sort of idea even though I don't know anything about those -- but how about getting more stakes/stumps if ever needed? Isn't it discontinued or something? How to deal with a set, any set, that is being discontinued? Are the parts needed sourced from other brands? (worst case scenario?)

 

@Lawson: I may have to find me a pipe too I guess!! :)

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