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My First Staking Set Advice


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  • 4 weeks later...

I just wanted to add where I purchased my staking set from, as I was so impressed by the service I recieved.

It's an online store "Watchtoolsonline" (you can click that name to link to the shop). 

 

A great bloke named Keith runs the shop, and his customer service is par-excellence.  His tools may not be as cheap as ones on fleabay, but everything he sells he personally inspects for quality and he doesn't sell worn out or rusty gear; the equipment he sells has been well looked after.

 

Also one major point is the way he packs the goods he ships out ... some of the best packaging I've seen from an online store!!

All the stakes were packed in little baggies (all individuals named on the bags), then bubble wrapped, and packed separate from the wooden box.  And inside the box was dense foam cut to length for a perfect fit.  Just outstanding!!

 

Nice to know some people still take pride in the way they sell.

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That's a good recommendation Lawson, when mine was delivered (EBay) the wooden box had been damaged in transport due to lack of proper packing. Luckily I was able to do a good repair and refinish.

I'll be saving your recommended supplier for future use. Many thanks!

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  • 5 months later...

Old post, but I just got a small K and D set for $110 shipped. Comes straight from a watchmaker's store, is complete, and according to the seller, in very good condition. Will see... I have 2 watches that will be happy to see it come in, and my first balance staff replacement coming !!!

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  • 4 weeks later...

I think I am going to invest in a staking set and I have come across a cd for sale on ebay that might be worthwhile. It is a copy of a 106 page manual  by K&D and is titled Staking Tools And How To Use Them. I imagine it is something like a workshop manual for a staking set. I just thought it might be very instructional for a new owner like myself. I just wondered whether anybody has read it and could recommend it. It will work out around 20GBP from the states. I don't mind the price if it is going to be useful, considering how much a good set can cost, I would like to have some reference material to learn about all of the different tools and their uses.

Thanks.

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I was lucky enough to acquire a complete mint K&D set years ago with all the jeweling tools as well on eBay. I have that CD in book form and it's okay and gives a rudimentary use of the set. The better book, although pricy, which covers all the specialized K&D stake/stump/procedure such as jeweling reams, stakes, stumps and micrometer attachment as well as things like the Waltham tapered staff set is this:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/NEW-The-Watchmakers-Staking-Tool-High-quality-pro-printed-crisp-clean-Rare-book-/271447550319?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3f3388e96f

And George Daniels book "Watchmaking" which covers most staking uses and a whole lot more.
 

Also, see my post in this thread:

 

http://www.watchrepairtalk.com/topic/1074-staking/

 

Hope this helps :)

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It is ordered, thank you. 

I'll defiantly enjoy reading this, at work we have two very nice vintage staking sets that get used for nothing more than awkward bracelet work, making custom pins, and occasionally for working on hands. but there's a whole range of strange, unusual stakes and dies, that I honestly couldn't guess as to the intended purpose/potential use. 

Also sorry i completely brushed past the link to that eBay page when I commented.

Edited by Ishima
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Thanks for the link to the pdf. I will have a good read through it. The other book on ebay definitely looks worth buying too. Might go for that one, as I was willing to pay for the one in your post.

Thanks so much, can't wait to get reading!

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I was looking for a good copy of this a few months ago, and contacted one of the people who had organised a reprint of it. He informed me that, if I didn't mind spending a bit more money, all the relevant information from this book is included as a chapter in Archie Perkins Antique Watch Restoration Vol. I. I haven't bought it yet, but it seems like a good idea.

Stephen

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I was wanting to buy a complete staking set from cousins. It is only £155.00. Does it come with a manual? And will it help with jeweling?

I have finally figured out how to order on Cousins. That might make sense if you have read a post I put up in the past.

The reference number is S39653 from Cousins.

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Edited by diamondslayer
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I advise trying to get a vintage one, for as much or less, even if it's a little rusty and a couple of stakes are broken, the quality difference will be huge, I got the bergeon staking set that's about £800 new for about £100 second hand, (I'm not sure I could get a deal that good again, but I would certainly try)

As far as I'm aware I wouldn't expect manuals to be included.

I've used the inexpensive modern made burgeon staking set that belonged to a colleage, that one I believe is the one you're referring to, and I wasn't impressed. (it will still get the job done, mind you.)

Edited by Ishima
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I was wanting to buy a complete staking set from cousins. It is only £155.00. Does it come with a manual? And will it help with jeweling?

I have finally figured out how to order on Cousins. That might make sense if you have read a post I put up in the past.

The reference number is S39653 from Cousins.

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

No idea about the quality of the Indian set from Cousins, but the stakes are not the standard size for such sets, 4.7mm. This would mean that they are not interchangeable as most stakes in other sets are, and you would not be able to add other stakes you might want. I wouldn't expect a manual, and for jewelling you would either need a separate jewelling set, or one of the combined staking/jewelling sets available.

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  • 5 months later...
  • 1 year later...

Hi,

I am looking for a used staking tool. I found quite a few on ebay, but on many, the punches are in a bad condition.

What do you think of this one from Boley for 225 EUR?

http://www.ebay.de/itm/CSI-Uhrmacher-TRIEBNIETMASCHINE-mit-Zubehor-Uhrmacherwerkstatt-watchmaker-tool-/132041785702?hash=item1ebe4dc166:g:vp8AAOSw6DtYTczj

s-l500.jpg

s-l1600 (1).jpg

s-l1600.jpg

Thanks and a Merry Christmas to everyone!

Alexander

 

Edited by AlexanderB
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