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1970's Hamilton P2 Pulsar

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Hello, new to the site, and already with a question. I hope someone can help...

I found an old (vintage) Hamilton LCD watch the P-2 (I think, since it only has one push button for time only) cleaned it up and opened the case. The batteries had been taken out, so no corrosion. I went and purchased the battery "adapters" since this watch takes two of the current 377 batteries now. Put it all back together and...NOTHING.:pulling-hair-out:

After further examination I noticed that "board" where the batteries reside, was...well for a lack of a better term, rather darkened, as if it went through some heat damage. At first, I did not think anything of it, since I thought maybe this was done purposely to make the LCD red digits contrast better. I believe that the board is done, kaput, finito. My question is: Might there be a source for a replacement board (you really cant call it a movement), since there are NO MOVING parts, LOL.B)

If anyone can assist with any information either as to supplier, or any ideas as to what may be going on with the Movement.

Thank you in Advance,

Felix

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I have also been servicing a quartz watch (Miyota 6L72) with Renata 377 battery and had non-running problems. I solved problem by fitting an insulator to the negative contact in the battery hole where it goes into the movement. I think that without this insulator the battery was shorting out across the negative contact.  I think the battery design/dimensions may be different to the brand Miyota list in their tech data.  Maybe worth a try ?

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