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Best Practice - Regulating Watch Without a Timegrapher


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I have a pinpallet watch which I have serviced (formerly a non-runner) which is running very slow (5-10 mins per day), I have put it on my timegrapher (Weishi 1000) and it cannot get a reading on the watch. I get snow for about 1-2 seconds then the timegrapher starts again, but confirms (----) for the Rate in those few moments. Anyway, back to the subject matter, does anyone have a best practice, or can point me in the right direction, for manually adjusting the time regulation without a timegrapher. I am sure this is not a new topic, but I did a search but couldn't find anything, apologies if this has already been covered.

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20 minutes ago, Waggy said:

I have a pinpallet watch which I have serviced (formerly a non-runner) which is running very slow (5-10 mins per day), I have put it on my timegrapher (Weishi 1000) and it cannot get a reading on the watch. I get snow for about 1-2 seconds then the timegrapher starts again, but confirms (----) for the Rate in those few moments. Anyway, back to the subject matter, does anyone have a best practice, or can point me in the right direction, for manually adjusting the time regulation without a timegrapher. I am sure this is not a new topic, but I did a search but couldn't find anything, apologies if this has already been covered.

This is reminding me a lot of another discussion that occurred today here's a link to it

https://www.watchrepairtalk.com/topic/27057-what-you-on-with-today

As you can see the title of the talk appropriately does not fit the subject at all which is probably why you missed it today.

As I don't always know if pin levers function identical in all situations so conceivably can have a watch that just may not show up On the timing machine. So basically depending upon a variety of factors of unknown things may be a watch just can't be timed on the timing machine.

Then I assume the regulator pins of the proper spacing as if they're too far apart that would be a reason for running slow. Then this morning's discussion was it was at the maximum regulation do you have room to regulate it?

So if you have room to regulate to move the regulator you can do it the old-fashioned way. Although I modify that I like to use a digital timepiece as a reference. The reason I use digital is there's no hands so I don't have to contend with it may be a problem of where my digital timepiece hands are. If you ever looked at some quartz watches you'll notice that sometimes I'll be right on the second on one side of dial around them aside to be somewhere else. So with a digital timepiece that preferably has seconds I also find a small camera to photograph the watch and the digital timepiece that gives you time to study your picture and you don't have to pressure to try to look both at the same time. Then wait to see what's going on how slow are you and then you just gently start bumping the regulator and see what happens

then yes this is how they used to do it they would typically sceptered timepiece to a master clock. If they were doing chronometer watch trials you would typically have two people someday be looking at the master clock someday be looking at the watch and if you're really intense you can actually see is the second hand on a watch job every time the escapement impulses basically you get down to a fraction of a second for a chronometer. In your case I would just worry about getting it within a minute of the day and not worry about it

so old-fashioned way visually comparing to another timepiece that preferably keeps better time then whatever your timing

 

 

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