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This is a 2 part series from Oklahoma State University of Watchmaking on the correct use of Oilers.

Oiling a movement correctly is one of the most important skills you need to master, and these videos give some excellent advice.

 

Part 1

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eMJiX0MA-Wg

 

Part 2

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rlMW5qMHaNc

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Shame the videos are pixelated, but that's some incredibly useful information right there, i'd always struggled with this, I don't think my books ever explained this. 

Edited by Ishima

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