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dropped my tweezers

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had a clumsy moment this afternoon and dropped my tweezers :pulling-hair-out:they landed tip first into my desk. As you can see from the picture the end is bent. How to i get them back into working order. Does anyone have a good tutorial or advice?

 

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Using hammer straighten on anvil or any hard flat metal surface, then Grab a piece of sand papar with it, pull the sand paper out, repeat till you get the flat surface and the grab you want, next lay the sand paper on flat glass, as if holding something close the tweezers and reshape the outside and the tip. Avoid finer than original tip.

A good tip is one that dose not foul as you exert little excess force while holding a round object like a jewel. 

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I guess Whatever fine grit you got.  

As the sand wears out, your sand paper gets better for the finish.

Do not hammer hard.

Hold tweezers prependicular to the surface to shape the tip.

Dropping is a part of tweezering:lol:.  

 

 

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6 hours ago, Nucejoe said:

I guess Whatever fine grit you got.  

As the sand wears out, your sand paper gets better for the finish.

Do not hammer hard.

Hold tweezers prependicular to the surface to shape the tip.

Dropping is a part of tweezering:lol:.  

 

 

    have you ever seen a Jeweler's   hammer?    vin

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Hi Been there and had the same result,  They were gently hammered straight on a small anvil with stroking action towards the tips, then on to the wet and dry 120 grit to smooth and polish,  Now use general purpose tweezers for general work and my dumonts for the finer work and I am care full not to repeat the problem   all the best

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There is a huge selection of tweezers online at www.esslinger.com

Also they have every other watchmaker's tools at low prices, including hammers and sandpaper. Hope that you get the tweezer straightened out without spending too much!

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Use an old tweezer to get it back into shape. Put the old tweezer horisontal to the bent one and pull it out . That should fix the worst bend . Then dress the tweezer. DSCN9875.thumb.JPG.408c70eb9f6d2921f57dacbc17e34563.JPG

Edited by rogart63

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 Dumont tweezers are superior to cheapy ones mainly by the hardness factor of the metal. Overbending so the tip needs to be streightened back, hammer or any impact that can cause intercrystaline dislocation hence fatigue is the main concern.

Avoid heat, impact or overbending. You can still get some use out of the bent section.

The sand grit and finish is a matter of your choosing, notthing to do with fatigue.

This is a subject of metalurgical structures. 

Regards

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